Welcome, Fall 2024 new students!  This page includes information to help you prepare to register for classes in your first semester as a civil or architectural engineering student.

Your Fall 2024 Class Schedule

This is the standard fall schedule for architectural engineering students.  Generally, you should follow this schedule to stay on track for four-year graduation, unless you have a good reason to do otherwise, or if you plan to change majors.  Talk to your advisor if you have any questions about deviating from the standard schedule and how it may impact your long-term graduation plan.

Click on each class to learn more.

Pre-enrolled classes

In most cases, you will be pre-enrolled into the following classes to make the registration process easier in your first semester.  You should check to confirm that all of these classes are already on your schedule.  If not, don't worry - you can add them yourself during your enrollment window.

Your math class is based on your math placement and any college credit you've earned through AP exams or concurrent enrollment classes.

  • You should be pre-enrolled in APPM 1235 Precalculus for Engineers, APPM 1340 Calculus 1A, or APPM 1350 Calculus 1 for Engineers based on your math placement.  If not, you should add a math class during your enrollment window.
  • APPM classes include a lecture (meets 3x per week) and a recitation (meets 1x per week).
  • You can change your class time (space permitting) or change into a different math class during your enrollment window.
  • See below for more information about your math class options.

  • You should be pre-enrolled in this class.  If not, you can add it during your enrollment window.
  • This lecture-only class meets 1x per week and teaches you about the field of architectural engineering, including guest speakers from the faculty and industry.
  • If you're unsure about your major, this class may help you decide if architectural engineering is a good fit for your interests.
  • If you definitely plan to change your major, you may want to drop this class.  Contact your advisor with questions.

Students living in Engineering Connections (which is most of you) are required to take COEN 1830 First-Year Seminar (1 credit).  This class can count towards lower-division Humanities & Social Science (HSS) elective requirements. If you don't live in Engineering Connections, you were likely still pre-enrolled into this class, but you aren't required to take it. However, we strongly recommend keeping this on your schedule. This course is going to introduce you to influential faculty in the college and important resources while providing you with a small group community in the first 6 weeks of your first semester.

  • If you need to take COEN 1830, you should be pre-enrolled in it already.  You cannot change sections on your own.  If you need to change sections due to a time conflict, please fill out this form to request a section change. You can contact your advisor with any questions. 
  • If you don't live in Engineering Connections and want to drop COEN 1830 from your schedule, please contact your advisor for guidance. You cannot drop this class on your own. 

If you're in the Engineering Honors Program, you should be pre-enrolled in EHON 1151 Critical Encounters (3 credits).  This course counts as your Humanities & Social Science (HSS) elective (under #7 below) so you probably won't need to add an additional class.

If you're living in a non-engineering RAP, you may be required to take a different course instead.  Follow the instructions you receive from your RAP.  You may be pre-enrolled in your RAP course already, or may need to add it yourself during your enrollment window.

Classes to add during your enrollment window

The following classes are not pre-enrolled for any students.  You will need to register for these classes yourself during your enrollment window.

All AREN students should take either chemistry or physics this fall - your options depend on your math placement:

  • If your math placement is Precalculus or Calculus 1A, you should take chemistry this fall.
    • You should be pre-enrolled in CHEN 1201 General Chemistry for Engineers 1.  If not, you should add it during your enrollment window.
      • There is only one lecture time, but you can change your recitation (space permitting) during your enrollment window.
      • CHEN 1201 includes a lecture (meets 3x per week) and a recitation (meets 1x per week).
    • One year of high school chemistry is a prerequisite for CHEN 1201.  If you did not take chemistry in high school, please talk to your advisor about your options.
    • You will take physics in Spring 2024.
    • Not all majors require chemistry, so if you're thinking about changing majors (especially to aerospace), you should talk to your advisor.
       
  • If your math placement is Calculus, you can choose either chemistry or physics this fall.
    • CHEN 1201 General Chemistry for Engineers 1
      • You may have been pre-enrolled in this class.  If so, you can keep it as is, switch sections (space permitting), or drop it and add physics instead.
      • One year of high school chemistry is a prerequisite for CHEN 1201.  If you did not take chemistry in high school, please talk to your advisor about your options.
      • Not all majors require chemistry, so if you're thinking about changing majors (especially to aerospace), you may want to consider taking physics this fall instead.  Talk to your advisor if you have questions.
    • Or, PHYS 1110 General Physics 1
      • Some calculus experience is recommended before taking physics.
    • You'll end up taking both chemistry and physics - whichever one you don't take in the fall, you'll take in the spring.
    • Both chemistry and physics include a lecture (meets 3x per week) and a recitation (meets 1x per week).

Architectural engineering students can choose to take either a chemistry lab or physics lab.

  • If you want to take the physics lab, you'll take it later (concurrently with Physics 2, usually in your sophomore year).
  • If you want to take the chemistry lab, you'll probably want to take it in the same semester that you take chemistry (but this is not required).
    • If you're taking CHEN 1201 this fall, you can add CHEM 1114 General Chemistry Lab 1 (1 credit) during your enrollment window.

  • You were not pre-enrolled into this class and will need to add it yourself during your enrollment window.
  • This introductory programming class teaches Python.  It includes a lecture (meets 2x per week) and a lab (meets 1x per week).
  • This class is not applicable to all majors, so if you're unsure of your major, talk to your advisor.  You may want to take a different computing class or wait to take it until you've made a final decision about your major.

Choose one of the following options.  Note that you'll end up taking all of these classes eventually, so it's not critical which one you take this fall.  Try to have a few options picked out before your enrollment window in case some of them fill up.

  • Nothing (don't add another class)
    • Depending on how many credits you're already taking, and/or whether you already have elective credit (from AP, IB, or concurrent enrollment classes), you may not need to take another class this fall.  Taking fewer credits in your first semester can make the transition to college more manageable.
    • If you don't have any earned college credit, you can still choose not to take an additional class this fall.  However, you'll need to take more credits in a future semester to make up the difference.  Talk to your advisor if you have questions.
  • Humanities & Social Science (HSS) elective
    • Refer to these instructions for help finding approved HSS electives.
    • A complete explanation of HSS categories and requirements is on the HSS webpage.
  • GEEN 1400 Engineering Projects (3 credits)
    • This hands-on projects class includes a lecture (meets 1x per week) and a lab (meets 2x per week).  You can't choose any lecture with any lab, you must enroll in a matching pair (section 030/031, 040/041, etc.).
    • Space in this class is limited, so you should have back-up options ready.  If you're not able to get into this class for fall, don't worry - there will be more space available in spring.
    • If you're interested in a career in construction management, you may want to consider taking CVEN 2012 Intro to Geomatics as a substitute for GEEN 1400.  Talk to your advisor if you're unsure or if you'd like more information about these options.
  • ENES 1010 Engineering, Ethics & Society (3 credits)
    • This class fulfills the engineering writing requirement.  It is only open to first-year students - otherwise, you'll take writing in your junior year.
    • Space in this class is extremely limited, so you should have back-up options ready.  If you're not able to get a spot, you can try again for spring or summer.
    • These are very small, discussion-based classes - be aware that active participation is expected.  Different section numbers have different topics - read about them in the "Class Notes" section of the course search website.
    • There is one section of this course specifically for international students who are non-native English speakers (section 800).  You cannot enroll in this section on your own - contact your advisor for guidance.
  • AREN 1027 Engineering Drawing (3 credits)
    • This class includes a lecture (meets 2x per week) and a lab (meets 2x per week in a computer lab).
    • AREN 1027 primarily focuses on creating computer-rendered drawings using Revit software.
  • Other?
    • If you need to take a class for ROTC, band, etc., it can go in this spot.  Check to see if they pre-enrolled you or if you need to add the class yourself.
    • Your advisor can tell you if/how these classes will apply to your architectural engineering degree.
    • If you're concerned about your fall course load and think it may be too much, talk to your advisor.  We can let you know if it's possible to drop one of your other classes and take it later.

This is the standard fall schedule for civil engineering students.  Generally, you should follow this schedule to stay on track for four-year graduation, unless you have a good reason to do otherwise, or if you plan to change majors.  Talk to your advisor if you have any questions about deviating from the standard schedule and how it may impact your long-term graduation plan.

Click on each class to learn more.

Pre-enrolled classes

In most cases, you will be pre-enrolled into the following classes to make the registration process easier in your first semester.  You should check to confirm that all of these classes are already on your schedule.  If not, don't worry - you can add them yourself during your enrollment window.

Your math class is based on your math placement and any college credit you've earned through AP exams or concurrent enrollment classes.

  • You should be pre-enrolled in APPM 1235 Precalculus for Engineers, APPM 1340 Calculus 1A, or APPM 1350 Calculus 1 for Engineers based on your math placement.
  • APPM classes include a lecture (meets 3x per week) and a recitation (meets 1x per week).
  • You can change your class time (space permitting) or change into a different math class during your enrollment window.
  • See below for more information about your math class options.

  • You should be pre-enrolled in this class.  If not, you should add it during your enrollment window.
  • This lecture-only class meets 1x per week and teaches you about the field of civil engineering.
  • If you're unsure about your major, this class may help you decide if civil engineering is a good fit for your interests.
  • If you definitely plan to change your major, you may want to drop this class.  Contact your advisor with questions.

Students living in Engineering Connections (which is most of you) are required to take COEN 1830 First-Year Seminar (1 credit).  This class can count towards lower-division Humanities & Social Science (HSS) elective requirements. If you don't live in Engineering Connections, you were likely still pre-enrolled into this class, but you aren't required to take it. However, it is highly encouraged to keep this in your schedule. This course is going to introduce you to influential faculty in the college and important resources while providing you with a small group community in the first 6 weeks of your first semester.

  • If you need to take COEN 1830, you should be pre-enrolled in it already.  You cannot change sections on your own.  If you need to change sections due to a time conflict, please fill out this form to request a section change. You can contact your advisor with any questions. 
  • If you don't live in Engineering Connections and want to drop COEN 1830 from your schedule, please contact your advisor for guidance. You cannot drop this class on your own. 

If you're in the Engineering Honors Program, you should be pre-enrolled in EHON 1151 Critical Encounters (3 credits).  This course counts as your Humanities & Social Science (HSS) elective (under #7 below) so you probably won't need to add an additional class.

If you're living in a non-engineering RAP, you may be required to take a different course instead.  Follow the instructions you receive from your RAP.  You may be pre-enrolled in your RAP course already, or may need to add it yourself during your enrollment window.

Classes to add during your enrollment window

The following classes are not pre-enrolled for any students.  You will need to register for these classes yourself during your enrollment window.

All CVEN students should take either chemistry or physics this fall - your options depend on your math placement:

  • If your math placement is Precalculus or Calculus 1A, you should take chemistry this fall.
    • You should be pre-enrolled in CHEN 1201 General Chemistry for Engineers 1.  If not, you should add it during your enrollment window.
      • There is only one lecture time, but you can change your recitation (space permitting) during your enrollment window.
      • CHEN 1201 includes a lecture (meets 3x per week) and a recitation (meets 1x per week).
    • One year of high school chemistry is a prerequisite for CHEN 1201.  If you did not take chemistry in high school, please talk to your advisor about your options.
    • You will take physics in Spring 2024.
    • Not all majors require chemistry, so if you're thinking about changing majors (especially to aerospace), you should talk to your advisor.
       
  • If your math placement is Calculus, you can choose either chemistry or physics this fall.
    • CHEN 1201 General Chemistry for Engineers 1
      • You may have been pre-enrolled in this class.  If so, you can keep it as is, switch sections (space permitting), or drop it and add physics instead.
      • One year of high school chemistry is a prerequisite for CHEN 1201.  If you did not take chemistry in high school, please talk to your advisor about your options.
      • Not all majors require chemistry, so if you're thinking about changing majors (especially to aerospace), you may want to consider taking physics this fall instead.  Talk to your advisor if you have questions.
    • Or, PHYS 1110 General Physics 1
      • Some calculus experience is recommended before taking physics.
    • You'll end up taking both chemistry and physics - whichever one you don't take in the fall, you'll take in the spring.
    • Both chemistry and physics include a lecture (meets 3x per week) and a recitation (meets 1x per week).

  • CHEM 1114 is required for civil engineering students.  In general, you should take CHEM 1114 in the same semester that you take chemistry (CHEN 1201) - talk to your advisor if you have questions about this.
    • If you're taking chemistry this fall, you should add CHEM 1114 during your enrollment window.  You are not pre-enrolled in this course.
    • If you're not taking chemistry this fall, you will wait and take CHEM 1114 later.
  • This is a lab-only course that meets 1x per week.

  • You were not pre-enrolled into this class and will need to add it yourself during your enrollment window.
  • This introductory programming class teaches Python.  It includes a lecture (meets 2x per week) and a lab (meets 1x per week).
  • This class is not applicable to all majors, so if you're unsure of your major, talk to your advisor.  You may want to take a different computing class or wait to take it until you've made a final decision about your major.

Choose one of the following options.  Note that you'll end up taking all of these classes eventually, so it's not critical which one you take this fall.  Try to have a few options picked out before your enrollment window in case some of them fill up.

  • Nothing (don't add another class)
    • Depending on how many credits you're already taking, and/or whether you already have elective credit (from AP, IB, or concurrent enrollment classes), you may not need to take another class this fall.  Taking fewer credits in your first semester can make the transition to college more manageable.
    • If you don't have any earned college credit, you can still choose not to take an additional class this fall.  However, you'll need to either take a summer class, or take more credits in a future semester to make up the difference.  Talk to your advisor if you have questions.
  • Humanities & Social Science (HSS) elective
    • Refer to these instructions for help finding approved HSS electives.
    • A complete explanation of HSS categories and requirements is on the HSS webpage.
  • GEEN 1400 Engineering Projects (3 credits)
    • This hands-on projects class includes a lecture (meets 1x per week) and a lab (meets 2x per week).  You can't choose any lecture with any lab, you must enroll in a matching pair (section 030/031, 040/041, etc.).
    • Space in this class is limited, so you should have back-up options ready.  If you're not able to get into this class for fall, don't worry - there will be more space available in spring.
  • ENES 1010 Engineering, Ethics & Society (3 credits)
    • This class fulfills the engineering writing requirement.  It is only open to first-year students - otherwise, you'll take writing in your junior year.
    • Space in this class is extremely limited, so you should have back-up options ready.  If you're not able to get a spot, you can try again for spring or summer.
    • These are very small, discussion-based classes - be aware that active participation is expected.  Different section numbers have different topics - read about them in the "Class Notes" section of the course search website.
    • There is one section of this course specifically for international students who are non-native English speakers (section 800).  You cannot enroll in this section on your own - contact your advisor for guidance.
  • CVEN 2012 Intro to Geomatics (3 credits)
    • This class includes a lecture (meets 2x per week) and a lab (meets 1x per week).
    • CVEN 2012 primarily teaches surveying, and the lab includes hands-on work outdoors.
  • Other?
    • If you need to take a class for ROTC, a Residential Academic Program (RAP), band, Goldshirt, etc., it can go in this spot.  Check to see if they pre-enrolled you or if you need to add the class yourself.
    • Your advisor can tell you if/how these classes will apply to your civil engineering degree.
    • If you're concerned about your fall course load and think it may be too much, talk to your advisor.  We can let you know if it's possible to drop one of your other classes and take it later.

In your first semester only, we pre-enroll you into some of your fall classes to make the registration process easier.  The classes you're pre-enrolled into are based on your major and your math placement at the time that pre-enrollment occurred.  You may also be pre-enrolled into a class based on your housing or other special programs.

Pre-enrollment does not take into account any college credit you may have earned from AP, IB, or concurrent enrollment classes.  You'll have the opportunity to decide if you want to adjust your classes based on any credit you've earned.

If you're pre-enrolled in a class you don't want, don't panic!  Your pre-enrolled classes are the starting point for your fall schedule.  You can change your pre-enrolled classes and finalize your fall course schedule during your enrollment window.  We do recommend keeping your pre-enrolled classes unless you have a good reason to change them, as it will make registration faster, easier, and less stressful.

View your pre-enrolled classes on the Class Schedule card in the Buff Portal.

Most classes will be in person, but some may be offered remote, online, or hybrid.  Some classes offer multiple options (you may be able to choose an in-person section or a remote section), while other classes have only one option available.

Make sure you pay careful attention to the instruction modes for each class section when searching for classes and adding them to your shopping cart.

Screenshot of CU Boulder class search highlighting course instruction mode

Math class information

The standard engineering curriculum starts with Calculus 1 in the first semester.  However, high school math preparation can vary, and we want you to be successful!  The math placement process helps us determine the best place for you to start.  Your math placement is based on your score on the Math Readiness Exam, plus information from your high school transcript, etc.  Based on your math placement, you should be pre-enrolled into one of the following courses:

  • APPM 1235 Precalculus for Engineers
    • You may also be pre-enrolled in APPM 1236 Precalculus Work Group, which you can choose to keep or drop.  See below for more information about the work groups.
  • APPM 1340 Calculus 1 with Algebra, Part A (the first half of a year-long Calculus 1 sequence)
  • APPM 1350 Calculus 1 for Engineers

You can keep your pre-enrolled math class or change to a different one during your enrollment window.  See below for more information and eligibility requirements for each class.

If you placed below Calculus 1 and want to improve your placement, you can take a proctored math placement test in August.  More information and the registration form are available on the math placement website.  The proctored math placement test is your final chance to improve your math placement, so you should spend time this summer reviewing Precalculus topics to prepare.

The math placement process is intended to determine your readiness for Calculus 1 - therefore, Calculus 1 is the highest possible math placement.  If you want to start higher than Calculus 1, you need to have college credit via an AP exam or college-level course taken in high school.  See below for the requirements for each course.

You can earn Calculus 1 credit with:

  • AP Calculus AB exam score of 4 or higher
  • AP Calculus BC exam score of 3 or higher, with an AB subscore of 4 or higher
  • A college-level (concurrent enrollment) course that transfers to CU Boulder as equivalent to our Calculus 1
  • Calculus CLEP exam score of 54 or higher
    • The CLEP exam can be a good option for students who took college-level calculus in high school, but didn't have the opportunity to earn credit via concurrent enrollment or an AP exam.  CLEP exams are offered through the College Board - information is here.

You can earn Calculus 2 credit with:

  • AP Calculus BC exam score of 4 or higher
  • A college-level (concurrent enrollment) course that transfers to CU Boulder as equivalent to our Calculus 2

Note that just taking AP calculus in high school is not enough to move up to a higher class.  You must have taken the AP exam and earned a qualifying score.

See below for more general information about AP and concurrent enrollment credit, how to make sure you get the credit you've earned, and how to see if your college credit has posted to your account.

Moving into a higher math class

If you have college credit for calculus, you have the right to use that credit toward your degree and proceed directly to the next higher math class.  However, you can also choose to repeat a course, even if you already earned credit for it.

As a general rule, we recommend that you repeat the last math class for which you have credit (Credit for Calculus 1 = start in Calculus 1.  Credit for Calculus 1 and 2 = start in Calculus 2, etc.). It is critical that you start in the most appropriate math class to give you the best foundation for future coursework.  Most high school calculus courses (even AP and college-level courses) don't prepare students well enough to jump directly into the next course at CU Boulder, and they often end up struggling.  Repeating your last course gives you the opportunity to capitalize on your previous calculus experience, start off strong in your first semester, and develop a solid foundation to be successful going forward.

With that said, it is ultimately your decision.  If you're considering moving into a higher math class, we highly recommend reviewing the APPM Department’s exam archives to make sure you are completely comfortable with the material covered in any course(s) you'll be skipping. We recommend completing an old final exam under authentic exam conditions (2.5 hours, no book/notes/online resources, no calculator) to assess if you are confident in the material.

Important to know

  • If you repeat a class for which you have credit, you essentially lose your previous credit.  Example: A student has AP credit for Calculus 1 but decides to repeat the course at CU Boulder in their first semester. If the student does not pass the class, they cannot “fall back” on their AP credit, and they must retake the class and get a passing grade.  The most recent grade applies.  This situation is rare, but it has happened.
  • You can't use duplicate credit toward your degree.  Example: You can't retake Calculus 1 at CU Boulder and also use your Calculus 1 AP credit to count for a free elective.
More information about college credit and your math options is available on the college website here.

APPM courses are taught by the Applied Math Department and are intended for engineering students.  MATH courses are taught by the Math Department and are intended for arts & sciences students, but are also accepted by engineering.

APPM courses generally consist of a large lecture (100+ students) that meets 3x per week, and a small recitation that meets 1x per week.  MATH courses are small lecture courses (25-30 students) that meet 5x per week.

Engineering students are encouraged to take APPM (Applied Math) courses, which have been specifically developed to prepare you for engineering classes.  However, the equivalent MATH courses are also accepted for your engineering degree, and may be a better fit for some students.  If you have any questions about the differences between APPM and MATH, please let your advisor know.

APPM courses are very challenging, but there are lots of resources available to help you succeed!  You may want to consider adding an optional work group, especially if you're taking a new course that you didn't already take in high school.  These are optional, Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory courses that only apply to free electives, but are intended to help you do better in your math class.  Students who take a work group statistically do better in APPM courses than those who do not.

  • APPM 1236 Precalculus Work Group (1 credit)
  • APPM 1351 Calculus 1 Work Group (1 credit) - this course is especially recommended for students who do not have previous calculus experience, but it’s open to everyone.
  • APPM 1361 Calculus 2 Work Group (1 credit)
  • APPM 2351 Calculus 3 Work Group (1 credit)

Math class options

APPM 1235 Precalculus for Engineers (4 credits)
or MATH 1150 Precalculus Mathematics (4 credits) and MATH 1151 Precalculus Supplemental Lab (1 credit)

Eligibility for Precalculus is based on your math placement, or if you have college credit for Precalculus or higher.

We strongly recommend that you take the math course you're most likely to be successful in this fall, and for many students, that's Precalculus.  You shouldn't feel pressured to move up to Calculus 1 if it's not the best fit for you.  Starting in a math class you're not prepared for will make the entire engineering curriculum harder than it needs to be, and we hate to see students struggle year after year because they didn't start off with a strong math foundation.  That being said, the standard engineering math sequence does start with Calculus 1.  In order to stay on track with the four-year curriculum for your major, you should plan to take Calculus 2 next summer (either at CU or as a transfer course).  If you are not able to do this, you will need to follow a modified degree plan - this could possibly affect your course options and/or your graduation date.  Talk to your advisor if you have questions about this.

If you were pre-enrolled into APPM 1235, you can keep your pre-enrolled class, change class times (space permitting), or switch into MATH 1150/1151 during your enrollment window.
If you were pre-enrolled into APPM 1236 (the Precalculus Work Group), you can keep your pre-enrolled class, change class times (space permitting), or drop the work group during your enrollment window.  You must be enrolled in APPM 1235 in order to take APPM 1236.

If you placed into Precalculus and want to move up to Calculus 1, you can take a proctored math placement test offered in August (you should receive an invitation by email to sign up). Please spend time this summer reviewing Precalculus topics to prepare!

More information about math classes is available on the College website here.

APPM 1340 Calculus 1 with Algebra, Part A (fall)
and APPM 1345 Calculus 1 with Algebra, Part B (spring)

Calculus 1 with Algebra, Part A (or Calculus 1A) is part of a two-semester math sequence which will satisfy your Calculus 1 requirement.  Eligibility is based on your math placement, or if you have college credit for Precalculus or higher.

We strongly recommend that you take the math course you're most likely to be successful in this fall.  Starting in a math class you're not prepared for will make the entire engineering curriculum harder than it needs to be, and we hate to see students struggle year after year because they didn't start off with a strong math foundation.  The year-long Calculus 1 sequence is a great option for students who could benefit from a slower pace and a few weeks of precalculus review before jumping into calculus.  That being said, if you take the year-long Calculus 1 option, you will be a semester behind the standard engineering math sequence.  In order to stay on track with the four-year curriculum for your major, you should plan to take Calculus 2 next summer (either at CU or as a transfer course).  If you are not able to do this, you will need to follow a modified degree plan - this could possibly affect your course options and/or your graduation date.  Talk to your advisor if you have questions about this.

If you were pre-enrolled into APPM 1340, you can keep your pre-enrolled class or change your class time (space permitting) during your enrollment window.

If you placed into APPM 1340 and want to move up to Calculus 1, you can take a proctored math placement test offered in August (you should receive an invitation by email to sign up). Please spend time this summer reviewing precalculus topics to prepare!

More information about math classes is available on the College website here.

APPM 1350 Calculus 1 for Engineers (4 credits)
or MATH 1300 Calculus 1 (5 credits)

Eligibility for Calculus 1 is based on your math placement, or if you have college credit for Precalculus or higher.

If you were pre-enrolled into APPM 1350, you can keep your pre-enrolled class, change class times (space permitting), or switch into MATH 1300 during your enrollment window.

If you already have college credit for Calculus 1 (via a qualifying AP/CLEP score or concurrent enrollment course), you have the option to move into a higher class during your enrollment window.  Please read information on math credit by examination or college-level coursework above.

More information about math classes is available on the College website here.

APPM 1360 Calculus 2 for Engineers (4 credits)
or MATH 2300 Calculus 2 (5 credits)

To enroll in Calculus 2, you must have college credit for Calculus 1 or higher (via a qualifying AP score, concurrent enrollment course, or CLEP exam).  

If you have Calculus 1 credit on file and want to switch into Calculus 2, you can do so during your enrollment window.  Please read information on math credit by examination or college-level coursework above.

Before switching into Calculus 2, you should make sure you're completely comfortable with the material covered in Calculus 1 at CU Boulder.  You should take an old Calculus 1 final exam under authentic conditions (2.5 hours, no books/notes/online resources, no calculator) and check your answers against the solution key.  If you feel comfortable with the Calculus 1 material with a score of 70% or higher, you may be ready to move into Calculus 2.

More information about math classes is available on the College website here.

APPM 2350 Calculus 3 for Engineers (4 credits)
or MATH 2400 Calculus 3 (5 credits)

To enroll in Calculus 3, you must have college credit for Calculus 2 or higher (via a qualifying AP score or concurrent enrollment course).  You cannot place into Calculus 3 via a placement exam.

If you have Calculus 2 credit on file and want to switch into Calculus 3, you can do so during your enrollment window.  Please read information on math credit by examination or college-level coursework above.

Before switching into Calculus 3, you should make sure you're completely comfortable with the material covered in Calculus 2 at CU Boulder.  You should take an old Calculus 2 final exam under authentic conditions (2.5 hours, no books/notes/online resources, no calculator) and check your answers against the solution key.  If you feel comfortable with the Calculus 2 material with a score of 70% or higher, you may be ready to move into Calculus 3.

More information about math classes is available on the College website here.

Chemistry class options

The minimum requirement for architectural engineering is one semester of general chemistry, usually CHEN 1201 General Chemistry for Engineers 1 (4 credits).

An accelerated chemistry course is also available, CHEN 1211 Accelerated Chemistry for Engineers (4 credits).  This course includes additional material and is faster paced than CHEN 1201.  It is available to students who have a Chemistry AP score of 3+, an IB score of 5+, or via a placement exam.

You are not required to take the accelerated chemistry course, even if you qualify for it.  However, you may want to consider it if:

  • You have a significant chemistry background and may be bored in the slower-paced course.
  • You are considering changing to a major that requires additional chemistry (environmental engineering or chemical engineering, in particular).

What if I want to take physics in the fall?  Is this even relevant?

If you want to take the accelerated chemistry course, you should be aware that it is only offered in the fall. You can enroll in CHEN 1211 for the fall semester (if eligible) and then take physics in the spring. You should not take chemistry and physics in the same semester.

How to enroll

If you qualify for CHEN 1211 and want to take it, you can register during your enrollment window.  If your enrollment window has already passed, please let your advisor know.  Please do not enroll in CHEN 1211 if you don’t meet the requirements, or you will be dropped from the class.

Lab options

Architectural engineering students need to take either a chemistry lab or physics lab.  Your options are:

  • CHEM 1114 Laboratory in General Chemistry 1 (1 credit) - for students who take CHEN 1201
  • CHEM 1221 Engineering General Chemistry Lab (1 credit) - for students who take CHEN 1211
  • PHYS 1140 Experimental Physics 1 (1 credit) - if you want to take the physics lab, you will take it concurrently with Physics 2 - usually in your sophomore year

REMINDER: You may have different chemistry requirements if you change your major, if you are pre-med, etc.  Please contact your advisor if you have any questions about your chemistry options, or which class is right for you.

The minimum requirement for civil engineering is one semester of general chemistry with a lab, usually CHEN 1201 General Chemistry for Engineers 1 (4 credits) and CHEM 1114 Laboratory in General Chemistry 1 (1 credit).

An accelerated chemistry course is also available, CHEN 1211 Accelerated Chemistry for Engineers (4 credits) and CHEM 1221 Engineering General Chemistry Lab (1 credit).  This course includes additional material and is faster paced than CHEN 1201/CHEM 1114.  It is available to students who have a Chemistry AP score of 3+, an IB score of 5+, or via a placement exam.

You are not required to take the accelerated chemistry course, even if you qualify for it.  However, you may want to consider it if:

  • You have a significant chemistry background and may be bored in the slower-paced course.
  • You are considering changing your major to one that requires additional chemistry (environmental engineering or chemical engineering, in particular).
  • You want to take certain electives which require more chemistry knowledge.  For example, CVEN 4404 Water Chemistry requires two semesters of general chemistry, or the accelerated chemistry course.  These electives will be most relevant to students interested in environmental engineering as an area of focus within the civil engineering degree program.

What if I want to take physics in the fall?  Is this even relevant?

If you want to take the accelerated chemistry course, you should be aware that it is only offered in the fall. You can enroll in CHEN 1211/CHEM 1221 for the fall semester (if eligible) and then take physics in the spring. You should not take chemistry and physics in the same semester.

How to enroll

If you qualify for the accelerated chemistry course and want to take it, you can register during your enrollment window.  If your enrollment window has already passed, please let your advisor know.  Please do not enroll in CHEN 1211/CHEM 1221 if you don’t meet the requirements, or you will be dropped from the class.

REMINDER: You may have different chemistry requirements if you change your major, if you are pre-med, etc.  Please contact your advisor if you have any questions about your chemistry options, or which class is right for you.

Humanities & Social Science (HSS) elective requirements

Civil and architectural engineering follow the minimum HSS requirements for the College of Engineering & Applied Science.  This includes 15 total credits of HSS electives, of which at least 6 credits must be upper-division (3000-level or higher).  In other words, 6 credits of upper-division HSS electives, plus 9 credits of HSS electives at any level.  Only approved HSS electives can count toward these requirements.

For achitectural engineering only: ARCH 3214 History and Theory of Architecture 2 is required, but this course also counts toward the upper-division HSS requirement.  Therefore, architectural engineering majors are only required to select 12 credits of HSS electives, of which 3 credits must be upper-division.

You can see how your previous credit applies to HSS requirements by running a degree audit.  Instructions on how to run an audit for your major are here.

Your audit will have two HSS sections: “Upper Division Humanities and Social Science” and “Remaining Humanities and Social Science”.  HSS credit from AP/IB/concurrent enrollment courses will automatically show up under one of these sections.  If you are expecting HSS credit but don’t see any on your audit, please check back later - your scores or transcripts may not have been processed yet.  It's also helpful to let your advisor know if you're expecting credit, so we can advise you appropriately - read more about AP, IB, and concurrent enrollment credit below.

A full list of class categories which will count for HSS credit is here, and instructions for using the class search to find open HSS electives are here.

In this case, it's not necessary for you to take an HSS elective this fall.  However, if you still want to add another class to your schedule, you can consider a different option listed under the "Your Fall 2024 Class Schedule" section above.  Another option is to start working on your upper-division (3000- or 4000-level) HSS requirements.  While we generally recommend upper-division courses for juniors and seniors, some 3000+ level HSS courses are open to first-year students.  If you are using the class search to find these options, please keep an eye out for any registration restrictions for each class.  Some classes require junior (or higher) class standing or the completion of prerequisite courses which you probably haven't taken yet.  If you’d like to take an upper-division HSS elective and have trouble finding options that you’re eligible to take, please reach out to your advisor.

There is no standard recommendation for which HSS classes you should take, as this depends on each student's interests.  With so many options in the HSS categories, we understand that it can be overwhelming to find the best fit for you.  It can help to narrow in on a few subjects that you are most interested in (for example, Psychology, Music, Economics, Foreign Language, etc.) and then use the class search to filter by subject.  For more strategies on fulfilling HSS electives, please read the final section on this webpage.  This goes without saying, but please choose elective classes based on your particular interests and needs - not because you think a class will be "easy"!  HSS classes are one of your few opportunities to take courses outside of math/science/engineering - we recommend using these to explore passions in other areas and continue improving your skills.

AP, IB, and concurrent enrollment credit

If you took any AP exams in high school, you may earn college credit that can apply toward your engineering degree.  Please note:

  • Taking an AP course isn't enough to earn college credit - you must have taken the AP exam and earned a qualifying score.
  • Not all AP scores will earn college credit.  The chart here shows qualifying scores for each exam.
  • Not all AP credit is applicable to your engineering degree.  Your credit must be applicable to your major's degree requirements in order to be used toward your degree.  Surplus AP credit will be posted to your record but will not help you toward graduation.

In order to get college credit for your AP exams, make sure you've requested to have your scores sent directly to CU Boulder from the College Board.

You cannot use your AP credit (to move up into a higher math class, etc.) until your scores have been received, processed, and the credit has posted to your account.  This will probably not be until mid-July for exams taken this year.  If your enrollment window has already passed before your AP credit is processed, don't worry - fall registration will reopen on August 19 and stay open until the fall semester begins.

Your advisor will let you know if you have AP credit that will count toward your degree.  However, please note that if your AP scores are received late, we will not be notified automatically.  If you're expecting AP credit (especially if it may affect your fall classes), it is your responsibility to let your advisor know so we can advise you appropriately.

If you took any IB classes in high school, you may earn college credit that can apply toward your engineering degree.  Please note:

  • Not all IB scores will earn college credit.  The chart here shows qualifying scores for each subject.
  • Not all IB credit is applicable to your engineering degree.  Your credit must be applicable to your major's degree requirements in order to be used toward your degree.  Surplus IB credit will be posted to your record but will not help you toward graduation.

In order to get college credit for your IB exams, make sure you've requested to have your score report sent to CU Boulder from the IBO.

IB credit cannot be counted toward your degree until your scores have been received, processed, and the credit has posted to your account.  This usually occurs in mid-late July.  If your enrollment window has already passed before your IB credit is processed, don't worry - fall registration will reopen on August 19 and stay open until the fall semester begins.

Your advisor will let you know if you have IB credit that will count toward your degree.  However, please note that if your IB scores are received late, we will not be notified automatically.  If you're expecting IB credit (especially if it may affect your fall classes), it is your responsibility to let your advisor know so we can advise you appropriately.

If you took a college-level course while in high school, you may have earned college credit that can transfer to CU Boulder.  These programs may be referred to as concurrent enrollment, dual enrollment, etc.

  • If you took a course through CU Succeed, your college credit is awarded through CU Denver and automatically appears on your CU account and on your transcript.
  • If you took a college course through another program, you need to make sure that an official transcript is sent directly from the college awarding the credit to the CU Boulder Admissions Office.

You cannot use your concurrent enrollment credit (to move up into a higher math class, etc.) until your college transcripts have been received, processed, and the credit has posted to your account.  If your enrollment window has already passed before your credit is processed, don't worry - fall registration will reopen on August 19 and stay open until the fall semester begins.

Your advisor will let you know if you have concurrent enrollment credit that will count toward your degree, but this can take several weeks after your transcript is received.  If you're expecting college credit (especially if it may affect your fall classes), it is your responsibility to let your advisor know so we can advise you appropriately.

Make sure you've had any AP exam scores, IB scores, and college transcripts sent to CU Boulder.  The Admissions Office will process your scores/transcripts and will post any credit you've earned to your account.  Each qualifying score/class is converted into a CU Boulder course number, and that course will apply to your degree the same way as if you had taken it at CU Boulder.  For example, AP credit for Calculus 1 will show on your account as "MATH 1300."

You can see what credit you've earned by running a degree audit.  Your degree audit shows all of the requirements for your major, all of the credit you've earned, and how each class is applying to your degree.  Note that your degree audit may not be 100% accurate until your advisor has had a chance to review it and make any adjustments that are needed.  We'll also contact you later this summer, once it looks like all of your credit is final, to confirm what requirements you have fulfilled.

 If you were pre-enrolled into Calculus 1, the CU Boulder course will show in your degree audit instead of your AP/concurrent enrollment credit.  If you see >R next to your Calculus 1 course, that means you already have Calculus 1 credit on file.

Screenshot of degree audit highlighting the >R designation for a repeated course

If you think you should have credit, you've had your scores/transcripts sent to CU Boulder, but the credit still isn't showing on your degree audit, let your advisor know.  In most cases, everything is fine and it will just take more time for your credit to be processed.  But it's helpful for us to know what credit you're expecting, so we can advise you appropriately.

Registration and Your Enrollment Window

During your enrollment window, you will (hopefully) finalize your fall course schedule.  You can change your pre-enrolled classes, and/or add additional classes to your fall schedule.  You don't need to worry about your spring schedule yet - you'll register for your spring classes in November.

Ideally, we recommend sticking with your pre-enrolled classes as much as possible unless you have a good reason to change things.  Creating your perfect schedule can be tempting, but we pre-enroll you for a reason!  Enrollment windows can be hectic, and some classes will fill up quickly.  Students who try to make too many changes sometimes get stuck and find that everything they need is already full.

To-do items

  1. To have the best chance of getting into the classes you want, have them picked out and already in your shopping cart before your enrollment window opens.  Some classes will fill up within a few minutes (or even a few seconds), so you want to have everything ready to go in advance.
  2. Complete your preregistration items before your enrollment window, so you don't have to spend time doing it when your enrollment window opens.
  3. Make sure you understand how to use the registration system.  Review the Enrolling in Classes module of the Online Experience, and/or the registration instructions linked below, if needed.

Important to know

  • Open seats in first-year courses are evenly divided among the seven enrollment windows, so everyone has an equal chance of getting into the class they want.  Seats that are reserved for your enrollment window won't open until 8:30am (Boulder time) on Day 1.  If a course shows as "closed" but says there are seats available, you can expect more seats to open when your enrollment window starts.  If the class has 0 seats available, however, it's truly full and you should look for another option.
  • Putting a class in your shopping cart does not reserve your spot.  Your seat is not guaranteed until you have successfully enrolled in the class, and see it on your course schedule.

Step-by-step instructions

Helpful hints

  • The more back-up options you have picked out in advance, the more smoothly registration will go.  Hopefully you won't need them, but if you do, it will be a lot faster if you already have them picked out and in your shopping cart.
  • The class search website has tools to help you avoid time conflicts (see the instructions linked above).  If you prefer to visualize your schedule with paper and pencil, here's a worksheet you can use.

You will have access to drop, add, and change classes from 8:30am on Day 1 until 4:30pm on Day 2 (Boulder time).  You'll have the best chance of getting into the classes you want if you are already signed in and ready to go right at 8:30am - especially if you're trying to get into a class with limited availability.

Be especially cautious when dropping any classes - when you drop a class, you're giving up your seat, and another student can enroll in your place.  We recommend swapping classes, which means that the system drops you from one class and enrolls you in another class at the same time.  If the new class is full, the entire transaction will fail, which means you'll keep your seat in the original class.

Do your prep work in advance, get signed in and ready to go before 8:30am, and then take a deep breath and relax!  While you may not get your ideal schedule this semester, there are plenty of classes for everyone.  We are available to help if you get stuck, and will make sure everyone gets into a full schedule of classes.

Important to know

  • You are limited to 17 credits in your first semester at CU Boulder.  The registration system will not allow you to enroll in more than 17 credits, even if you plan to drop a class later.
  • You cannot enroll in classes at conflicting times, even if you plan to drop one of them later.  You'll need to drop the conflicting course first, or do a course swap.
  • Waitlists are not available during the enrollment windows - waitlists are risky, and we need to make sure you get enrolled in a full schedule of classes.
  • Classes with multiple components (lecture + lab, or lecture + recitation) are all-or-nothing.  You must add or drop all of the required components together.  If you want to change your lab or recitation without dropping the entire class (and potentially losing your spot), see below for instructions.

Step-by-step instructions

Helpful hints

  • If you're trying to get into a class with limited availability (ENES 1010 or GEEN 1400 are common examples), deal with that class first, so you can enroll as quickly as possible.  You don't need to enroll in all of your classes at once - you can go back into the registration system as many times as you need to.
  • If the class you want is full, please enroll in a backup!  However, you can also keep checking back throughout your enrollment window to see if a spot opens up.  If another student drops that class, it will create an open seat for someone else (that's you!) to enroll.
  • The more flexible you are (with class times, backup courses, keeping your pre-enrolled classes, etc.) the easier and less stressful your enrollment window will be.

Your advisor will check your fall schedule after your enrollment window, and will let you know if we see any issues.

In most cases, you'll finalize your fall schedule during your enrollment window and won't need to make any further changes.  However, there are always a few exceptions.  Maybe you get AP, IB, CLEP, or concurrent enrollment credit after your enrollment window has ended.  Or maybe you didn't get into a class that you really want to take, and you're hoping a spot will open up later.  If you need to change your schedule after your enrollment window, registration will reopen for all students on August 19, and will stay open until the fall semester has started.

Make sure you stay in contact with your advisor about any AP, IB, or concurrent enrollment credit you're expecting, so we can be on the lookout for it, and make adjustments to your schedule if needed.

Registration FAQ

Please read the section on “pre-enrollment” at the top of this page.

In general, yes, your pre-enrolled classes are all required for your major, or are required by another program (RAP, LLC, Goldshirt, PLC, etc.).  If you drop one of your pre-enrolled classes, in most cases you will still have to take that class later.

However, please note that your pre-enrolled classes were chosen based on your current major.  If you change your major, your pre-enrolled classes may no longer be required.

Unless there was an error in the pre-enrollment process, no.  Everyone will have an equal chance to change their pre-enrolled classes when your enrollment window opens.

See the list of recommended first-semester courses by major.

If you definitely want to change majors:

Look at the recommended first-semester courses for the major you want to switch into.  Keep in mind that some courses may be restricted to students who have already declared that major.  If you’re sure that you want to change your major, you may want to see if you can change now, so that you can access all of the courses you need.  Information on changing your major (before school starts) is here.  After school has started, see your advisor for help changing your major.

If you’re deciding between a few different majors:

You can check out the recommended first-semester courses for each of the majors you’re considering and look for commonalities.  Your advisor can also help you choose courses that will be applicable to the widest range of majors you’re interested in.

If you have no idea and want to keep all of your options open:

We recommend following the schedule for “Open Option (undeclared) - XXEN”.  The courses listed there will count toward any engineering major.  We also recommend talking to your advisor about your interests so we can help you choose the most appropriate courses.

If a class has multiple components (lecture and lab, lecture and recitation, etc.) then yes, you need to enroll in one of each.

Sometimes you can choose any lecture and any lab/recitation, and sometimes they are grouped together in pairs (like for GEEN 1400).  But either way, you need to enroll in one of each.

Unfortunately no, advisors cannot enroll you into classes that are full.  Check to see if there’s another section that will work with your schedule.  If not, you may need to choose a different course.

If the class you’re having difficulty with is required (for example, your math class), you may need to ask your advisor to help you look at other options.  Sometimes, you may need to change one of your other classes in order to get your schedule to work.

See if your pre-enrolled class has other days/times available - if so, you may be able to switch sections in order to make room for the class you need to add.

If your pre-enrolled class is only at one time, talk to your advisor.  We can let you know if it’s possible to delay that class to a later semester, if there’s a substitute class available at a different time, etc.

If your enrollment window hasn’t started yet, more seats may open up when your window opens (at 8:30am on Day 1).

If your enrollment window is already open, but you’re getting an error that the class is closed, it’s because the remaining seats are being saved for future enrollment windows.  You’ll need to choose a different section or course.

Read the error message carefully - it will describe the problem that’s preventing you from enrolling.  If you can’t figure out what it means, you can ask your advisor.  Just saying “I got an error” usually isn't enough information - please send us a screenshot or the actual text of the error message.

Contact your advisor for help!  We can't necessarily fix everything for you, but we can usually help you sort through some options and find something that works for you.