Deep tech

‘Deep tech’ spinouts set records during pandemic year

CU Boulder deep tech companies—those based on science and engineering—recently set records for raising capital, acquisitions and going public, even during the COVID-19 pandemic.

This scanning electron microscope image shows the distinct bow tie shape of an optical rectenna.

New devices can turn waste heat into electricity

Engineers at CU Boulder have debuted the world’s most efficient optical rectennas—devices that are thinner than the width of a human hair and can capture waste heat and turn it into usable power.

Group in Engineering lab

Another disadvantage for women in male-dominated fields?

A recent study co-written by CU Boulder researchers shows that how people seek knowledge in the workplace might leave women disadvantaged in male-dominated fields.

Computer image with gender details

How computers see race and gender

Morgan Klaus Scheuerman has one fundamental goal with his research: to show tech companies that marginalized people matter.

Science student and professor

New $7 million initiative seeks to spark curiosity in K–12 science students

William Penuel, a professor in the Institute of Cognitive Science, imagines science classrooms where children are free to explore what makes them curious—asking then answering their own questions on topics ranging from ocean acidification to antibiotic resistance in hospitals.

Sea ice mural in downtown Boulder by Kendall Kippley

Arctic sea ice trend depicted through art

The Arctic is warming twice as fast as the rest of the globe, and one serious consequence is sea ice loss.

CU Boulder researchers

New CU Boulder COVID-19 test

Cheaper, faster test trades uncomfortable nose swab for spit-in-a-tube simplicity in effort to detect virus before it spreads

A sign announces the closure of an ice cream shop in Denver at the height of the coronavirus pandemic.

Mathematician on the front lines of Colorado’s coronavirus response

At the start of 2020, David Bortz, like most Coloradans, didn’t know what a coronavirus was.

Rachel Sharpe holds up bags holding bands for face shields made with 3D printers on the CU Boulder campus.

Labs use 3D printers to create face shield parts for health care workers

As coronavirus cases mounted in Colorado, several dozen 3D printers on the CU Boulder campus roared back to life to make personal protective equipment (PPE) for health care workers on the front lines of the crisis.

A business displaying a sign that they are currently closed due to COVID-19.

Program helps entrepreneurs survive the COVID-19 economy

A new CU Boulder initiative, COventure Forward, is determined to help Colorado’s small businesses hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic.

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