Ice on power lines

What went wrong with Texas’ power grid? A Q&A with CU Boulder experts

Feb. 22, 2021

On Feb. 13, a severe winter storm swept across Texas and nearby southern states, bringing sub-zero temperatures and snowfall as far south as the border with Mexico. The polar air that descended on Texas lasted many days, leading to a statewide crisis as energy grids failed to supply enough power, fuels froze and water pipes burst.

Keith Molenaar

Professor earns ASCE-CI Peurifoy Construction Research Award

Feb. 22, 2021

Professor Keith Molenaar has been awarded the 2021 Peurifoy Construction Research Award by the American Society of Civil Engineers Construction Institute (ASCE-CI) Construction Research Council.

Ben Livneh

With less moisture, experts worried the 2021 fire season could be as bad as 2020

Feb. 19, 2021

Much of the western United States has seen less than 85% of the snow it is used to getting and it is worrying some about the fire season ahead. “There absolutely is a lot of concern that we could see another record fire season,” said Ben Livneh, a hydrologist and...

John Zhai

Researchers study social distancing, ventilation in predicting the probability of COVID infection

Feb. 18, 2021

As the global pandemic developed, keeping adequate personal distance and using effective ventilation systems were emphasized to control the spread of COVID-19 – especially in confined spaces. That is because social distancing avoids direct contact among people and reduces transmission of virus-carrying droplets from human respiration, while improved ventilation dilutes...

Kyri Baker

Texas-like blackouts unlikely in Colorado

Feb. 18, 2021

DENVER (KDVR) – It’s possible, but not probable, that Colorado could experience widespread blackouts for days as millions of people in Texas have, according to energy experts. About 90% of Texas is on its own independent power grid, the Texas Interconnect. It does not have to abide by many federal...

Evan Thomas

Keeping a dry eye on drought in East Africa

Feb. 4, 2021

As rainfall is increasingly scarce in East Africa, existing groundwater supplies become the main source of water for people, livestock and agriculture. Maintaining access to this life-sustaining resource requires an extensive network of wells and pumps. Earth observations from NASA satellites can indicate that a drought might be on the...

Mark Hernandez

Hernandez part of campus COVID-19 Webinar Series

Jan. 27, 2021

Professor Mark Hernandez will give an overview of the modern methods for determining the identity, distribution, and abundance of the airborne microbes that we encounter indoors and the persistence of airborne viruses such as COVID-19 at noon on Feb. 2 via Zoom as part of a campus webinar series. Pre-registration...

Mark Hernandez

Researchers fight COVID-19 with new air filtration in Denver Public Schools

Jan. 27, 2021

Since the summer, Professor Mark Hernandez and his team have been working in the Denver district’s classrooms to install a new generation of high-efficiency air filters.

Bridges to Prosperity

Mortenson Center leading work to study trail bridge use in rural Rwanda

Dec. 18, 2020

The World Bank estimates that nearly a billion people across the globe lack access to an all-season road within two kilometers of their home. It’s a problem the Mortenson Center in Global Engineering and their collaborators are working to better quantify and solve.

Roseanna Neupauer

CU researchers contribute to frost quake modeling research

Nov. 16, 2020

Frost quakes are not particularly rare, but they are harder to observe than traditional earthquakes. Professor Roseanna Neupauer was part of a recent effort to develop new models with the Oulu, Finland, 2016 quake data, the results of which are discussed in a new paper published in the Journal of Geophysical Research.

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