Formosa and endoculus

A robot may one day perform your colonoscopy

May 28, 2019

Researchers in Mark Rentschler's lab designed a robot to navigate the unpredictable terrain of the intestine. The group hopes the robot will change how people across the United States get colonoscopies, making these common procedures easier for patients and more efficient for doctors.

knee joint imaging technique measures strain to detect osteoarthritis

Functional imaging technique could diagnose early osteoarthritis, NIH awards $2.7M

April 19, 2019

Associate Professor Corey Neu of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at CU Boulder is working with colleagues at CU Anschutz to detect early osteoarthritis, allowing younger patients to seek treatment earlier and possibly ward off the most severe measures including joint replacement.

imaging system designed at cu boulder

$1 million imaging system opens world of research at college, across campus

April 8, 2019

A new high-resolution X-ray microtomography imaging system designed by Wil Srubar, Virginia Ferguson, Mija Hubler, Robert McLeod and Stephanie Bryant will enhance research, not only in engineering, but in the fields of archaeology, geology and medicine across campus and the Rocky Mountain region.

A rendering of a brain.

Deciphering the Parkinson’s disease puzzle

July 26, 2018

Alaa Ahmed is working to unlock the secrets of Parkinson’s disease and make life better for its sufferers. The University of Colorado Boulder Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering has earned a multi-year grant from the National Institutes of Health to study the illness and a potential treatment for it. Parkinson’s...

National Science Foundation logo.

NSF honors students with Graduate Research Fellowships in 2018

The National Science Foundation is honoring six current or incoming University of Colorado Boulder mechanical engineering students with Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) awards and five students with honorable mentions.

Mechanical engineering Associate Professor Mark Rentschler and three graduate students with an oversized version of a synthetic colon created as a senior design project. Rentschler is the lead scientist on a CU Boulder project to design a sophisticated robotic small intestine.

A robotic small intestine? Researchers are making one

Dec. 4, 2017

The day is coming when doctors-in-training can perfect certain medical practices on a robotic small intestine and test medical treatments on a human-made device vs. animals. Mechanical engineering Associate Professor Mark Rentschler is leading the effort to develop an artificial, robotic small intestine for use in medical laboratories. The research...

Madalyn Kern

ME Alumni in Focus: Adjustable prosthesis offers mobility to the masses

Nov. 27, 2017

Amputees face a lifelong problem: Over time, as their residual limb inevitably changes shape, their prosthetic leg socket no longer fits. Without adjustments to the socket, the device becomes nearly useless. Enter Madalyn Kern, a CU Boulder mechanical engineering PhD graduate whose work focuses on medical-device design. Traveling to an...

A detail view of part of the microscope

Brain microscope wins $2 million NIH grant

Oct. 5, 2017

A collaboration between CU Boulder and the Anschutz Medical Campus featuring professor Victor Bright has won a $2 million grant allowing them to refine a unique microscope they have developed while expanding its use to other scientists across the country. “We will deploy a fiber-coupled, two photon miniature microscope to...

Max Armstrong working with a person who has a prosthetic leg.

ME Student's affordable prosthetic system could help amputees worldwide

Sept. 13, 2017

Few people figure out how they want to change the world in middle school. But in eighth grade, Peter “Max” Armstrong did just that. As part of a robotics project, his teacher prompted him to solve a problem in medicine. He talked to a family friend, a double amputee and...

Drawing of maggots

Tomorrow’s mini medical robots could squirm like maggots

July 26, 2017

Conventional pharmaceuticals aren't always the best way to treat an ailment. Drugs are often imprecise, unpredictable, or come along with tricky side effects. Medicine is always trying to move on to more targeted treatments. And soon, robots will be one of those options: small and mobile, they could theoretically deliver...

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