MCEN 1024: Fundamentals of Chemistry for Mechanical Engineers

  • Understand the fundamental concepts of the atom, including atomic number, mass number, atomic symbols and atomic masses.
  • Be able to discuss ions and their properties.
  • Understand the nature of compounds, their formulas and their bonding.
  • Be able to identify and name binary covalent and ionic compounds.
  • Be able to discuss inorganic and organic chemical systems, and identify their similarities and differences.

  • Be able to write and balance chemical reactions.
  • Understand aqueous solutions, solvents and solutes.
  • Be able to write and balance chemical equations for aqueous reactions, including acid-base reactions.
  • Be able to interpret chemical equations, specifically to determine empirical and molecular formulas using moles and molar masses.

  • Be able to obtain chemical ratios for a balanced chemical reaction.
  • Be able to determine limiting reactants, theoretical and percentage yields and solution stoichiometry.

  • Be able to correlate structure with bonding, and rationalize the resulting properties.
  • Understand the concepts of pressure, partial pressure, and ideal versus real gases.
  • Be able to apply the Ideal Gas Law to chemical reactions involving gases.
  • Understand the postulates of the Kinetic-Molecular Theory of Gases and its limitations.

  • Understand the concepts of the electromagnetic spectrum (the nature of light), atomic spectra, and the quantum mechanical model of the atom.
  • Be able to apply the Pauli Exclusion Principle to the determination of orbital energies and electron configurations.
  • Be familiar with the trends of the Periodic Table, and be able to relate these trends to chemical behavior such as bonding and the properties of matter.

  • Be able to identify and describe ionic and covalent type bonding; understand the similarities and differences between the two types of bonding.
  • Be familiar with the concepts of electronegativity, bond polarity, and the use of Lewis structures in predicting chemical structure.
  • Be familiar with the model of orbital overlap in chemical bonding, and the use of hybrid orbitals to predict molecular shape.

  • Be able to compare and contrast gases, liquids and solids in terms of bonding, structure and properties.
  • Be able to describe bonding in solids, including models for metallic bonding.
  • Understand the difference between types of solids: conductors, semiconductors and insulators.
  • Be familiar with the types of intermolecular forces.

  • Be able to define energy, its forms and the units of energy.
  • Understand the concepts of heat capacity, calorimetry, and enthalpy.
  • Be able to define and use the laws of thermodynamics in characterizing thermochemical reactions.
  • Be able to use Gibbs Free energy to characterize spontaneity.

  • Understand the foundational concepts of chemical equilibrium, including the determination of equilibrium constants to describe chemical reactivity.
  • Be able to determine equilibrium concentrations of products from initial concentrations.
  • Understand solution equilibria and use of LeChatelier’s Principle in predicting changes to chemical equilibrium.
  • Be familiar with Bronsted-Lowry theory of acids and bases.

MCEN 1025: Computer-Aided Design and Fabrication 

  • Generate hand-drawn multi-view technical sketches. 
  • Create a multi-view sketch given an isometric pictorial and vice versa.

  • Create solid models of individual parts.
  • Create reference geometry features (planes, axes). 
  • Create solid features using sweeping and lofting operations.
  • Measure properties of 3-D CAD models. 
  • Create assemblies of CAD parts with appropriate mating relationships.

  • Know the principal planes of projection and the principal views • Be able to distinguish between first-angle and third-angle projection. 
  • Be able to create hidden lines, center lines, etc. based on graphics conventions.
  • Create multi-view drawings from 3-D solid models on a CAD system.
  • Be able to represent typical features: e.g. holes, threads, chamfers, and fillets.
  • Create multi-view drawings given isometric pictorials of complex objects using 3-D solid models • Create auxiliary views automatically from 3-D solid models.
  • Be able to generate appropriate section views

  • Understand the basic terminology associated with dimensioning practice.
  • Demonstrate size, location, and coordinate dimensioning.
  • Create dimensioned drawings from 3-D solid models.
  • Create complete working drawings including assembly and detailed drawings for a “real-life” object

  • Understand the overall concept of GD&T.
  • Be able to recognize GD&T dimensioning on an engineering drawing.
  • Be able to determine maximum material condition (MMC) and its implications.
  • Be able to recognize and specify GD&T datums.
  • Be able to visualize tolerance zones as specified in GD&T

  • Describe basic machining processes.
  • Describe casting and forming processes.
  • Describe basic sheet metal operations.
  • Create a prototype using a contemporary rapid prototyping process

MCEN2000: Mechanical Engineering as a Profession

  • Understanding of professional communication skills and the ability to integrate those skills into daily interactions with faculty, staff, and peers.
  • Knowledge of the job search process including resumes, cover letters, and technical interviews.
  • Understanding of the different career opportunities available to mechanical engineers, as well as an understanding of how each course within the ME curriculum relates to potential career paths.
  • Understanding of relevant ethics, health, environmental, and social justice issues and the ability to apply that understanding to real world engineering problems.

MCEN 2023: Statics & Structures

  • Represent a directed distance and a force as a vector in two- and three-dimensions in Cartesian coordinates.
  •  Add forces and resolve forces into rectangular components.
  • Explain the idea of force equilibrium and Newton’s first law of motion, and determine when a particle subjected to a system of forces is in equilibrium.
  • Isolate an appropriate particle in a physical system and develop a free-body diagram for the system of forces acting on the particle.

  • Explain the ideas of a rigid body and its connection to a particle, the moment of a force about a point, the moment of a force about an axis, a couple, and external and internal forces.
  • Compute the moment of a force about a point using formal 3-D vector multiplication (cross product), and identify the simplification that results in two-dimensions.
  • Compute the moment of a couple, identify equivalent couples, and add couples.

  • Identify when a force system acting on a rigid body is in equilibrium. Express the force system in both vector and component form.
  • Identify equivalent force/moment systems.
  • Isolate an appropriate free body of a physical system and develop a free-body diagram for the system of forces and moments acting on the body. Apply this to such elements as pulleys, hinges, beams, cables, bearings, etc.
  • Classify the types of reaction supports and connections for two- and three-dimensional structures (pinned, built-in, etc.).
  • Write and solve the equilibrium equations for rigid bodies in two- and three-dimensions.
  • Classify two- and three-dimensional rigid-body systems as either statically determinant or indeterminate.
  • Identify bodies acted upon by only two or three forces and identify their properties.
  • Identify when a force system acting on a rigid body is in equilibrium. Express the force system in both vector and component form.
  • Identify equivalent force/moment systems.
  • Isolate an appropriate free body of a physical system and develop a free-body diagram for the system of forces and moments acting on the body. Apply this to such elements as pulleys, hinges, beams, cables, bearings, etc.
  • Classify the types of reaction supports and connections for two- and three-dimensional structures (pinned, built-in, etc.).
  • Write and solve the equilibrium equations for rigid bodies in two- and three-dimensions.
  • Classify two- and three-dimensional rigid-body systems as either statically determinant or indeterminate.
  • Identify bodies acted upon by only two or three forces and identify their properties. 

  • Define truss, frame, and machine structures
  • Draw free body diagrams of two-dimensional truss members and joints.
  • Compute the forces in two-dimensional truss members using the methods of joints and sections.
  • Identify multi-force members in frame structures and draw free body diagrams of two-dimensional frame members and joints.
  • Compute the forces in two-dimensional frame members by dismantling the structure and analyzing each member of the structure as a two-force or a multi-force member.
  • Identify the input and output forces of a machine and analyze it using the same procedure as for a frame.

  • Define the terms: center of gravity, centroid, and first moment of an area or line.
  • Compute the center of gravity of a two-dimensional body and the centroid of an area.
  • Compute concentrated loads that are equivalent to a specified distributed load.

  • Define static and kinetic friction, friction force, the coefficients of static and kinetic friction, and the angles of static and kinetic friction.
  • Draw free body diagrams of each part in a frictional system.
  • Analyze problems of friction for cases when motion is and is not impending.

  • Describe the physical meaning of internal shear stresses and bending moments.
  • Draw shear diagrams for members experiencing point and distributed loads.
  • Draw bending moment diagrams by integrating the shear diagrams and applying appropriate boundary conditions.
  • Identify how and where a member will fail when the maximum shear force or bending moment is exceeded.

  • Design a structure (truss or frame) that can support a specific load under given constraints.
  • Develop and utilize computational tools to analyze the forces in the structural members.
  • Work in teams to optimize the performance of the structure and present the design in a written report

MCEN 2024: Material Science 

  • Understand covalent, metallic and ionic primary bonding; understand the nature and role of secondary bonding.
  • Be able to describe the most important crystal structures by their unit cells. Be able to specify planes and directions by their indices. Execute density calculations. Understand polymorphism and allotropy. Distinguish between single crystal and polycrystalline materials.
  • Distinguish between isotropy and anisotropy, and homogeneity and inhomogeneity in materials.
  • Be able to describe semi-crystalline and non-crystalline structures.
  • Have the ability to describe important deviations from perfect crystalline structures: point, line, planar and volume defects. Understand their role in shaping material properties. Develop a qualitative understanding of the role of dislocations in the yielding of crystalline materials.

  • Be able to use the concepts of stress and strain in one dimension. Understand the tensile test, and be able to derive relevant mechanical parameters from such a test.
  • Understand the stiffness parameters for Young’s modulus and shear modulus, as well as Poisson’s ratio, for small deformations.
  • Know how to derive yield points from tensile tests. Be able to describe test curves past the yield point. Understand elastic recovery in a yielded material.
  • Relate yield strength to number of slip systems in various crystalline structures and to resolved shear stresses.
  • Understand differences between compression and tensile tests. Be able to relate hardness values to yield stress.
  • Understand the variability (statistical nature) of many mechanical parameters.

  • Understand the concepts of dislocations and slip systems in the plastic deformation of crystalline material systems.
  • Know the basic principle of strengthening: hindering dislocation motion.
  • Understand the four basic methods of strengthening: formation of solid solutions, grain size refinement, formation of fine dispersions of a second phase, and cold working.
  • Be able to solve one dimensional steady state and non-steady state diffusion problems involved in thermal processing of metals. Understand the factors that influence diffusion.
  • Understand the processes of recovery, recrystallization and grain growth used to “undo” cold work.

  • Know the principal modes of failure: brittle fracture, ductile fracture and creep.
  • Be able to describe brittle fracture. Be able to use the elementary parameters of fracture mechanics: stress concentrations, critical strain energy release rate, fracture toughness. Know impact test methods, and be able to interpret brittle to ductile transitions.
  • Be able to describe the generalized creep behavior of metals, including stress and temperature effects. Be able to apply temperature-time extrapolation methods.

  • Be able to calculate all relevant quantities in binary equilibrium phase diagrams: number of phases, composition of phases, and phase amounts. Be able to identify the eutectic and eutectoid, as well as the peritectic and peritectoid reactions.
  • Be able to interpret the Gibb’s phase rule.
  • Be familiar with the equilibrium Fe-C phase diagram. Be able to explain the development of equilibrium microstructures in these alloys, and the role of additional elements on the development of these microstructures.
  • Understand the influence of other alloying elements on the binary phase diagram.

  • Understand the basic material structure, including the role of structural features on properties.
  • Be able to describe and interpret the mechanical behavior and properties of metal alloys, ceramics and polymers. Understand the role of temperature and composition on mechanical behavior.
  • Be familiar with applications and processing approaches for basic metal alloys, ceramics and polymer systems.

  • Material properties – chemical, electrical, mechanical, physical.
  • Composites – structure, types, purpose, mixing laws.
  • Corrosion mechanisms and control.
  • Surface conditions – corrosion, degradation, coatings, finishes.

MCEN2043: Dynamics

  • Describe the distinction between a particle and a rigid body.
  • Define position, velocity, and acceleration of a particle in motion.  The concepts of position, distance traveled, velocity, and speed should be understood, and not confused.  Describe the physical interpretation of position, velocity, and acceleration of a particle.

  • Define mass, linear and angular momentum and explain the concept of a Newtonian reference frame. 
  • Write and explain Newton’s 2nd Law of Motion, and explain the concept of conservation of momentum.
  • Systematically use Newton’s second law to analyze the motion of a particle acted upon by forces that are constant, and explicit functions of time, position, and velocity.  Identify the appropriate initial conditions in each case, and describe physical examples of each case. 

  • Define and compute the work of a force and the kinetic energy of a particle.  Develop the principle of work and energy.  Apply the method of work and energy to problems involving a single body or connected bodies.
  • Define the concept of linear impulse and derive the principle of impulse and momentum. 
  • Select the method of analysis that is best suited for the solution of a given problem (Newton’s Law, Work and Energy, Impulse and Momentum) and the combination of these methods.

  • Define the fundamental types of plane motion.
  • Decompose general plane motion into the sum of a translation and a rotation.

  • Solve problems in two-dimensional rigid-body dynamics, regardless of their kinematic characteristics, by equating the sum of the forces acting on the rigid body to the vectors mass acceleration. To effect this solution, construct appropriate free-body diagrams. 

MCEN2063: Solid Mechanics

  • Analyze statically indeterminate problems.
  • Analyze stresses in members subjected to temperature changes as well as applied loads.
  • Understand the displacement method for systems with many elements subjected to axial loading.
  • Develop the force-displacement relationships for trusses using the displacement method in a matrix analysis framework.
  • Learn how to use load cells, an Instron tester, and dial indicators from a design optimization project involving an indeterminate structure.
  • Learn to work on a small team as part of this project.

  • Understand the basic relationships between torque, angular deflection,
  • shear stress, shear strain, and torsional stiffness.
  • Determine stresses and deflections for statically determinant and indeterminate systems.
  • Use the displacement method for torsional systems.
  • Calculate power transmitted to rotating parts and its relationship to torque and speed.
  • Become familiar with motors, angular measurement, and rotating components through a design optimization project involving the design of a rotating shaft. Learn to work in small teams.

  • Develop both shear and bending moment diagrams.
  • Understand and derive the differential equations relating load, shear and bending moment.
  • Solve for shear and bending moments in a beam when the applied loads are described by singularity functions.

  • Derive and determine shear and normal stress.
  • Derive and determine deflections in beams subjected to bending.
  • Perform stress and deflection analyses of beams containing non-uniform cross-sections.
  • Use double integration and superposition methods to obtain beam deflections.
  • Solve simple statically indeterminate problems.
  • Learn to apply strain gages, perform some simple machining, and understand Wheatstone bridges via a design optimization project involving the design of a beam subjected to a given load.

  • Understand the general state of stress at a point on a body in three dimensions.
  • Understand the equilibrium relationships of stress components at a point in a body in a state of plane stress or plane strain.
  • Perform stress and strain transformations and determine the principal and maximum shear stresses in a body.
  • Calculate the stresses in thin walled pressure vessels(cylindrical and spherical).
  • Develop the relationship between strain and displacement in a body subjected to plane strain or plane stress.
  • Understand the relationship between stress and strain for linear elastic materials.

  • Calculate the stresses in a body subjected to combined axial, bending and/or torsional loading.

  • Derive relationships leading to the calculation of critical buckling loads for axial loaded beams with different boundary conditions.

ECEN3010: Circuits & Electronics

  • Students will learn through lecture and laboratory how to analyze and measure electric circuits to determine voltage, electric current, and power.
  • Students will learn to solve circuits and electronics problems using fundamental circuit analysis techniques, including Kirchhoff’s laws, Ohm’s law, network reduction, node-voltage analysis, mesh-current analysis, and Thevenin equivalent circuits.
  • Students will learn how to perform transient analysis for first-order circuits.
  • Students will learn how to use phasors and impedance to solve for steady-state sinusoidal responses of circuits.
  • Students will learn how to analyze and design circuits with diodes and transistors.
  • Students will learn how to analyze and design operational amplifier circuits.
  • Students will learn how to solve problems involving digital electronics and microprocessors.
  • Students will learn how to design and build practical circuits using electric motors (DC and stepper) and sensors.

MCEN3012: Thermodynamics

  • Thermodynamic property data
  • Concepts of energy, heat, work, power, process, state
  • First Law Analysis - Students will be able to perform a First Law analysis on:
    • Arbitrary steady flow systems
    • Selected time-dependent open and closed systems
  • Second Law and Entropy Concepts - Students will be able to apply Second Law and entropy concepts to thermodynamic systems, including:
    • Gas and vapor power cycles
  • Property Data Tables and Modern Computational Tools - To solve thermodynamics problems, students will be able to use both:
    • Traditional property data tables
    • Modern computational tools
  • Contemporary Issues - Students will be able to demonstrate an awareness of the impact of thermodynamics on contemporary issues such as:
    • Air pollution
    • Power Generation
    • Automobile design.

MCEN3021: Fluid Mechanics

  • Define basic fluid properties including density, viscosity and surface tension.
  • Analyze fluid statics problems including forces on planar and curved surfaces. Describe flotation principles.
  • Solve problems in terms of basic fluid mechanics principles including mass conservation and momentum balance.
  • Apply the differential forms of equations of motion to elementary problems.
  • Perform inviscid flow analysis including Bernoulli equation applications.
  • Use dimensional analysis techniques for scaling and experiment design.
  • Explain basic concepts of incompressible external flows (boundary layers) and laminar and turbulent flows.
  • Employ solutions of laminar and turbulent pipe flow.
  • Recognize contemporary issues in fluid mechanics, including current applications in industry and research. 

MCEN3022: Heat Transfer

  • Calculate heat transfer rates and temperature profiles for:
    • steady unidirectional conduction in thin wall and thin shell configurations.
    • steady multidirectional conduction in simple configurations.
    • transient conduction using appropriate solution methods.

​ 
  • Define and evaluate the key dimensionless parameters that characterize flow fields and convective heat transfer.
  • Use similarity solutions and empirical correlations to evaluate heat transfer coefficients and rates for external and internal forced and natural convection in laminar and turbulent flow regimes.
  • Qualitatively describe flow and temperature fields in external boundary layers and pipe and duct flows.
  • Qualitatively describe the driving forces that govern natural convection.

​ 
  • Analyze radiative heat transfer between black or diffuse gray surfaces, using geometric view factors together with fundamental descriptions of thermal radiation.

​ 
  • Identify heat transfer mechanisms, formulate energy balance equations, and choose appropriate methods for evaluating the conduction, convection or radiation terms in the energy balance equation for mixed-mode heat transfer problems.
  • Use both the Log-Mean Temperature Difference method and the Effectiveness-NTU method to analyze heat transfer rates in heat exchangers, and understand which method to choose.

​ 
  • Apply knowledge of heat transfer to current issues, including aerospace applications, high temperature materials, combustion systems, power generation including solar energy, bioengineering applications.

MCEN3025: Component Design

​ 
  • Determine the stress state generated by basic loading configurations: tension, bending and torsion.
  • Know how to locate and calculate the maximum component stresses generated in tension, bending and torsion.
  • Understand how component stresses interact to create principal stresses.
  • Determine the force-deflection characteristics of simple bodies under tension, bending and torsion.
  • Understand the effect of having a curved beam vs. a straight beam and its effect upon the resulting stresses in the beam.
  • Know how to predict column buckling failure.
  • Have an awareness, and some working knowledge, of finite element analysis to predict stress and deflection in simple parts. 

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  • Understand the strength characteristics of different materials.
  • Understand the differences between ductile and brittle materials.
  • Apply various failure theories to parts under steady loading.
  • Understand the concept of safety factor and how to apply it.
  • Perform fatigue failure calculations.
  • Calculate and apply fatigue stress modifying factors relating to machining, size, loading, etc.

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  • Understand the various types of springs that are available and their function.
  • Determine the critical factors that influence a spring design including space limitations, pre-load, etc.
  • Calculate maximum shear stress, fatigue stress, buckling criteria, spring natural frequency, spring rate, for various spring configurations.
  • Calculate maximum stresses and deflections for torsion springs.

  • Understand fundamentals associated with a gear design: involute profile, circular pitch, pitch circle, base circle, addendum, dedendum, etc.
  • Understand the basic types of gears, including spur, helical, bevel and worm gears.
  • Calculate forces acting on meshing gears
  • Calculate velocity ratios of gear trains, including planetary gears.
  • Be able to size gears to transmit given loads and speeds.

  • Perform force analyses on tension connections, taking into account various modes of joint failure.
  • Determine strength and torque requirements for bolts.
  • Understand the effect of preload on the fatigue behavior of bolted connections.

  • Size shafts to transmit steady and alternating loads.
  • Design square keyways for torque transmission.
  • Be able to use bearing catalog information to select rolling contact bearings for given loads and speeds. 

  • Students will complete design projects that will integrate professional skills and fundamental machine design methodologies. The students must march from product specifications to component requirements to a fabricated and functioning design. Through these design projects students will utilize engineering related software skills (CAD, Matlab, etc), written communication skills, teamwork skills and project management skills. 

MCEN3030: Computational Methods

  • Define types of numerical error (truncation vs roundoff), and understand the concept of error scaling relationships.
  • Identify the mechanics, advantages and pitfalls of a variety of bracketing and open solution methods for solving single algebraic nonlinear equations.
  • Recognize the main computational steps in solving systems of linear equations and matrix inverses, such as forward substitution, backward substitution, Gauss Elimination, LU Decomposition, and explain how the computational cost of these procedures scales with the size of the matrix system. 

  • Know how to translate mathematical algorithms into MATLAB code, particularly: iterative formulas, linear algebra, and complicated summations.

  • Employ standard MATLAB software routines for linear algebra, root-finding, integration, curve-fitting, and solutions to systems of ordinary differential equations.

  • Solve differentiation and integration problems numerically.
  • Solve systems of ordinary differential equations, selecting methods that ensure a desired level of accuracy and stability, and distinguishing between implicit and explicit algorithms.
  • Employ (a) the shooting technique and (b) the finite difference method for solving boundary value ODEs.
  • Be able to apply and analyze (in terms of stability) numerical methods for solving simple hyperbolic (e.g., advection), parabolic (e.g., the heat equation) and elliptic (e.g., Laplace equation) PDEs. 
  • Estimate the error in the numerical solution of a problem, across the full range of classes of problems encountered in this course.

MCEN3032: Thermodynamics 2

  • Apply thermal, fluids, and heat transfer fundamentals to practical design problems.  Potential examples include heat exchangers, turbomachinery, and laval nozzles. 
  • Address current applications of thermal system design. Potential examples include combined cycles, cogeneration, absorption refrigeration and multi-effect evaporation.
  • Determine nonreacting gas mixture properties and perform energy analyses on gas mixtures.
  • Analyze energy balances and property changes for reacting systems with a focus on combustion.
  • Analyze vapor-compression refrigeration cycles and evaluate their performance.
  • Apply psychrometrics to heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems.
  • Effectively use computational tools to solve thermodynamics problems. 

MCEN3047: Data Analysis & Experimental Methods

  • Demonstrate understanding of the purpose of experimental measurements, including comparison of measured data to values predicted by the underlying physics and mathematical models.
  • Utilize experimental systems to acquire data and display it appropriately.
  • Describe the concepts of uncertainty, variability, bias, error, and resolution.
  • Describe how various instruments function and demonstrate proficiency in their calibration. 

  • Describe the meaning of confidence intervals and provide an accurate interpretation of their significance.
  • Learn how to test hypotheses about populations based on one or more samples.
  • Describe in words the difference between correlation and causation.
  • Identify appropriate mathematical models for experimental systems and perform regression analyses to fit the models to the data.
  • Implement one-factor and two-factor Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and meaningfully describe their results in words.  

  • Develop well-formatted and easily interpreted graphs of data.
  • Become proficient in writing short technical reports, paying special attention to report formatting and general layout.
  • Prepare well formatted and easily interpreted presentations and posters to quickly communicate project designs and experimental results to fellow engineers.  

MCEN4026: Manufacturing Processes & Systems

  • Define manufacturing and explain its relationship to design and marketing.
  • Describe the value added by manufacturing and its role in creating wealth in a nation.
  • Provide a historical perspective on the changing nature of manufacturing in the USA.  

  • Describe the nature of materials including atomic structure, crystalline and non-crystalline structures, and engineering materials.
  • Explain stress-strain relationships.
  • Discuss effect of temperature on properties. 

  • Explain alloys and phase diagrams.
  • Discuss ferrous and non-ferrous metals and super alloys.
  • Describe structure and properties of both traditional and new ceramics.
  • Discuss fundamentals of polymer technology, including thermosetting and thermoplastic polymers and elastomers.
  • Introduce students to composite materials such as metal matrix composites, ceramic matrix composites and polymer matrix composites.
  • Provide a comparative treatment of the processing of different engineering materials discussed above. 

  • Explain different metal casting processes including sand casting, permanent mold casting and other expendable mold casting processes.
  • Introduce students to good foundry practices and product design considerations.
  • Describe the technology and the underlying physics of shaping processes for plastics. The students should learn about properties of polymer melts, extrusion, spinning, coating processes, injection molding, compression and transfer molding and polymer foam processing.
  • Provide an introduction to shaping processes for polymer matrix composites including open and closed mold processes, filament winding and pultrusion processes.  

  • Explain fundamentals of metal forming including material behavior and temperature in metal forming.
  • Cover fundamentals of rolling, forging, extrusion, wire and bar drawing.
  • Describe basics of sheet metal working from cutting, bending and drawing operations to dies and presses for sheet metal processes. 

  • Provide theory of chip formation in metal machining,describe force relationships and the Merchant Equation, and provide energy and power relationships in machining.
  • Introduce students to turning, drilling and milling operations. 

  • Provide an overview of welding technology, discuss the weld joint and the physics of welding. Introduce students to different welding processes including arc, resistance, oxyfuel gas and solid-state welding.
  • Discuss the basics of brazing, soldering and adhesive bonding. Describe the different soldering processes including vapor phase, wave and infrared soldering.
  • Explain the basic differences between the different joining processes.

  • Provide an overview of different manufacturing steps involved in fabrication of ICs, including lithography, oxidation, deposition, etching, sputtering and other processes.
  • Introduce students to electronics packaging including different levels of packaging. Describe the various manufacturing steps used in the manufacture of printed circuit boards.
  • Discuss briefly technologies for the assembly of surface mount and through hole components. 

  • Introduce students to JIT, TQM, Benchmarking, CIM and other basic practices of World Class Manufacturing.
  • Explain the principles underlying SPC, Taguchi Methods and process capability indices.

MCEN4043: System Dynamics

  • Define a system and a dynamic system. Identify the input and output of a system. Classify systems. Identify the appropriate units used for mechanical, fluid, thermal, and electrical systems.
  • Develop and apply modeling templates for mechanical, fluid, thermal, and electrical systems.
  • Compute Laplace transforms for initial condition and forced transient problems. Compute transfer functions.
  • Compute inverse Laplace transforms to analyze the transient response of dynamic systems.
  • Analyze harmonic forcing and response of dynamic systems.
  • Computer Fourier series and the discrete Fourier transform.
  • Analyze and design coupled discrete systems.
  • Apply numerical methods to the solution of ODEs. 

MCEN4045: ME Senior Design 1

  • Develop an understanding of the professional skills needed to succeed in industry.
  • Understand how to collaboratively work in a team toward a common design.
  • Become proficient at: written technical communications, oral technical communications, managing long term projects, integrating technical skills to successfully complete a project
  • Develop the knowledge and ability to use skills in heat transfer, fluid mechanics, circuits, etc. to perform engineering analysis
  • Generate alternative design concepts and evaluate using design requirements
  • Apply engineering design skills to create CAD models and drawings to build professional prototypes
  • Use results of engineering analysis to make decisions (engineering and business) in a methodical manner
  • Fabricate and test physical prototypes to help make decisions

MCEN4085: ME Senior Design 2

  • Formulate a concise problem definition statement for an open-ended design problem
  • Develop quantitative design requirements.
  • Apply Quality Functional Deployment (QFD) to translate customer desires into engineering design requirements.  

  • Generate alternative design concepts that can potentially satisfy the design requirements
  • Perform the necessary engineering analysis to make engineering decisions in a methodical way
  • Set up and perform experiments to help make decisions
  • Create CAD models and drawings of physical prototypes
  • Fabricate and test physical prototypes   

  • Be able to function in a team environment
  • Present professional oral presentations, including preliminary and critical design reviews, final presentations
  • Write professional written reports, including technical manuals
  • Plan and manage a design project, including time management and financial budgets