1 Undergraduate Advising for the BS

Lesley McDowell is the Computer Science BS Program Advisor for Computer Science.  The undergraduate advising office is in the ECOT tower in 727 and advising hours are as follows:

Current students in the Computer Science BS program can schedule advising appointments by going to the Academic Advising Center to schedule an appointment. 

  • Advising hours for current students are:  Monday through Thursday, 9:00am to 12:00(noon) and 1:00pm to 4:00pm
  • Walk-in Advising hours for minors, prospective BS students are:  Fridays, 9:00am to 12:00 (noon) and 1:00pm to 4:00pm

2 Computer Science BS Program Introduction

As computer scientists, we craft the technologies that keep our cell phones and iPods working. We develop the large scale software that powers business and industry. We advance the computational techniques and write the software that supports scientists in their study of the world around us.

Many new computer applications remain to be discovered. Indeed, computing will be at the heart of future revolutions in business, science, and society. Students who study computer science now will be at the forefront of those important advances.

Computer Science graduates from the University of Colorado Boulder produce the software and systems that touch our lives every day in fields ranging from communications to finance to publishing. They work at some of the most influential companies in the world, at research institutions, non-profits, and at the smallest start-ups of every type imaginable. And many lead highly successful companies that they themselves have founded.

The BS degree program in Computer Science emphasizes knowledge and awareness of computing at all levels, from circuits and computer architecture through operating systems and programming languages to large application systems; the theoretical and mathematical aspects of computing; the interdependence of hardware and software; and the challenge of large-scale software production and the engineering principles used to meet that challenge.

2.1 Program Outcomes

The BS degree program aims to produce students that at the time of graduation have:

  • An ability to apply knowledge of computing and mathematics appropriate to the discipline.
  • An ability to analyze a problem, and identify and define the computing requirements appropriate to its solution.
  • An ability to design, implement, and evaluate a computer-based system, process, component, or program to meet desired needs.
  • An ability to function effectively on teams to accomplish shared computing design, evaluation or implementation goals.
  • An understanding of professional, ethical, legal, security and social issues and responsibilities for the computing profession.
  • An ability to communicate effectively about computing topics with a range of audiences.
  • An ability to analyze impacts of computing on individuals, organizations, and society.
  • Recognition of the need for and ability to engage in continuing professional development.
  • An ability to use current techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computing practice.
  • An ability to apply mathematical foundations, algorithm principles, and computer science theory in the modeling and design of computer-based systems in a way that demonstrates comprehension of the tradeoffs involved in design choices.
  • An ability to apply design and development principles in the construction of software systems of varying complexity.

2.2 Program Objectives

The BS degree program aims to produce alumni that within three to five years after graduation:

  • are prepared to be valued individual contributors in a software-oriented organization, to be programmers and designers in an entrepreneurial pursuit, to lead small projects and generally begin preparation for a management career, or to succeed in rigorous postgraduate programs
  • are able to focus their careers on pure computer science technology or to bring computer science expertise to a companion discipline
  • are prepared, where appropriate, to specialize in a broad spectrum of computer science sub-disciplines, ranging across formal computer science (e.g., computational science, bioinformatics, and theory), cognitive science (e.g., human/machine learning, human-computer interaction, collaborative work, and human language technologies), and core computing (e.g., systems, networks and software engineering).

2.3 ABET Accreditation

The Bachelor of Computer Science degree program is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). ABET accreditation is assurance that the program meets the quality standards established by the computing profession. ABET accreditation is important for many reasons:

  • Accreditation helps students and their parents choose quality college programs.
  • Accreditation enables employers to recruit graduates they know are well-prepared.
  • Accreditation is used by registration, licensure, and certification boards to screen applicants.
  • Accreditation gives colleges and universities a structured mechanism to assess, evaluate, and improve the quality of their programs.

The Bachelor of Computer Science degree program accreditation became effective October 1, 2008. Current accreditation lasts until September 30, 2016.

3 BS Degree Requirements Summary

Required courses must be taken in four major areas:

  1. Humanities and Social Sciences (24 credit hours)
  2. Natural Science (17 credit hours)
  3. Computer Science (58 credit hours)
    1. Foundation
    2. Tracks
    3. Electives
    4. Senior Capstone
  4. Mathematics (19 credit hours)

The BS in Computer Science degree culminates in a senior-year course where students carry out a year-long software engineering project for a real-world industry sponsor.

The BS in Computer Science prepares students for a wide range of careers in the computing field.

Contact Lesley McDowell if you would like to ask questions about the BS degree program.

3.1 Humanities and Social Sciences (24 credits)

A total of at least 24 credit hours of approved coursework in the Humanities and Social Sciences is required:

  • All courses must meet the following criteria:
    • College of Engineering and Applied Science H/SS and Writing Requirements
  • Courses must include one of the following:
    • WRTG 3030-3, Writing on Science and Society.
    • WRTG 3035-3, Technical Communication and Design.
    • HUEN 1010-3, Introduction to the Humanities (only if taken during Fall 2011 or later by students matriculating at CU-Boulder in Fall 2011 or later)
    • HUEN 3100-3, Humanities for Engineers 1.
    • PHYS 3050-3, Writing in Physics: Problem-Solving and Rhetoric.
    • other writing courses as approved by the Undergraduate Education Council.
  • At least six of the remaining 21 credit hours must be at the upper-division undergraduate level or above, i.e. numbered 3000 or above. Upper-division writing does not count towards this 6 credits of upper division coursework.

3.1.1 Quick way to find an approved Humanities and Social Science Course

Do a class search by going to the student portal :

  • click on “student tab”
  • next, click on the “search for classes” button
  • Search for any of the following approved Arts and Science Core categories:
    • Contemporary Societies
    • Foreign Language
    • Historical Context
    • Human Diversity
    • Ideals and Values
    • Literature and the Arts
    • United States Context
  • Search for any HUEN course.
  • Search for any 1000, 2000 or approved 3000 level foreign language courses
  • Search for any Economics, Ethnic Studies, History, Linguistics, Philosophy, Political Science, Religious Studies, or Women’s Studies courses that would count towards that a minor in that a minor field in this area, if you will earn this minor.
  • Search for any other course specifically approved for all students by the Undergraduate Education Council of the College of Engineering and Applied Science.

The following courses are so approved:

  • ANTH 4330-3 — Human Ecology: Archaeological Aspects
  • ANTH 4600 — Human Ecology: Cultural Aspects (No longer available)
  • ARCH 3114-3 — History and Theories of Architecture I
  • ARCH 3214-3 — History and Theories of Architecture II
  • ARCH 4010-3 — Architectural Appreciation and Design
  • ASEN 3036-3 — Introduction to Human Spaceflight
  • ASEN 3046-3 — Humans in Aviation
  • ATLS 2000-3 — The Meaning of Information Technology
  • CVEN 4700-3 — Sustainability and the Built Environment
  • ECEN 3070-3 — Edges of Science
  • ECON 3070-3 — Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
  • ECON 3080-3 — Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory
  • EDUC 4050-3 — Knowledge and Learning in Mathematics and Science
  • EMUS/MUEL/MUSC 3642-3 — History of Jazz
  • ENVD 2001-3 — Social Factors in Environmental Design
  • ENVS 3621 — Energy Policy and Society (No longer available)
  • GEEN 1100-3 — Social Impact of Technology
  • GEEN 2050-3 — Engineering Leadership Gateway
  • GEEN 3300 — Sustainability Ethics and Practice (No longer available)
  • GEOG 1982-3 — World Regional Geography
  • GEOG 1992-3 — Human Geographies
  • GEOG 3402-3 — Natural Hazards
  • HIST 4417-3 — Environmental History of North America
  • MATH 4820-3 — History of Mathematical Ideas
  • MCDB 1030-3 — Plagues, People, and Microorganisms
  • MCDB 3330-3 — Evolution and Creationism
  • PHIL 1400-3 — Science and Society
  • PHYS 3000-3 — Science and Public Policy
  • PRLC 3810-3 — Global Issues in Leadership
  • PSCI 3201 — The Environment and Public Policy (No longer available)
  • PSYC 1001-3-4 — General Psychology
  • SOCY 2077-3 — Environment and Society
  • SOCY 4007-3 — Global Human Ecology
  • SOCYI/ENVS 4027-3 — Inequality, Democracy, and the Environment
  • SPAN 3000-5 — Advanced Spanish Language Skills
  • SPAN 3200-3 — Spanish Culture and Civilization

Up to six credits of the following ROTC courses also count as H&SS electives:

  • NAVR 2020, 3101, 4020, 4101
  • AIRR 2010, 2020, 4010, 4020
  • MILR 4082
  • HIST 4146

Up to one credit hour of GEEN 1510 is also approved.

6) "Critical Thinking" courses offered by non-science departments through the Spring 2010 semester.

7) The college may consider meaningful groupings of courses in related subjects for H&SS electives, even if they are not courses in the A&S Core, when they are grouped so as to form a coherent plan of study. Students must petition for any proposed set of courses

3.2 Natural Science (17 credits)

A total of at least 17 credit hours of Natural Science is required which must include:

  • An Approved Science Sequence (3.2.1) that is approved for the student's chosen track.
  • An approved upper-division (numbered 3000 or above) science course, 3 credits or more from the Acceptable Natural Science course list (3.2.2).
  • If needed, enough credits to make the required 17 credits from the Acceptable Natural Science (3.2.2) course list.

3.2.1 Approved Natural Science Sequences

Except as explicitly noted below, the following sequences satisfy the Natural Science sequence requirement for all tracks:

Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences (ASTR)
  • ASTR 1030-4, Accelerated Introductory Astronomy 1.
  • ASTR 1040-4, Accelerated Introductory Astronomy 2.
  • PHYS 1110-4, General Physics 1.
  • PHYS 1120-4, General Physics 2.
  • One of the following:
    • ASTR 3710-3, Solar System Formation and Dynamics.
    • ASTR 3720-3, Planets and Their Atmospheres.
    • ASTR 3750-3, Planets, Moons, and Rings.

Satisfies the Natural Science sequence requirement for all but the following tracks: Computational Biology

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (ATOC)
  • ATOC 1050-3, Weather and the Atmosphere.
  • ATOC 1060-3, Our Changing Environment: El Nino, Ozone, and Climate.
  • ATOC 3300-3, Analysis of Climate and Weather Observations.
  • ATOC 3600-3, Principles of Climate.

Satisfies the Natural Science sequence requirement for all but the following tracks: Computational Biology

Biochemistry (CHEM)
  • CHEN 1211-3, General Chemistry for Engineers.
  • CHEM 1221-2, Engineering General Chemistry Lab.
  • CHEM 3311-4, Organic Chemistry 1.
  • CHEM 3321-1, Laboratory in Organic Chemistry 1.
  • CHEM 3331-4, Organic Chemistry 2.
  • CHEM 4711-3, General Biochemistry 1.
  • The following is not required, but is highly recommended for students in the Computational Biology track.
    • CHEM 4731-3, General Biochemistry 2.

Satisfies the Natural Science sequence requirement for all tracks.

Biological Psychology (PSYC)
  • EBIO 1210-3, General Biology 1.
  • EBIO 1230-1, General Biology Laboratory 1.
  • EBIO 1220-3, General Biology 2.
  • EBIO 1240-1, General Biology Laboratory 2.
  • PSYC 2012-3, Biological Psychology 1.
  • 3 credit-hour upper-division (3000 level or above) science course from the acceptable course list.

Satisfies the Natural Science sequence requirement for all tracks.

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EBIO)
  • EBIO 1210-3, General Biology 1.
  • EBIO 1230-1, General Biology Laboratory 1.
  • EBIO 1220-3, General Biology 2.
  • EBIO 1240-1, General Biology Laboratory 2.
  • EBIO 2070-4, Genetics: Molecules to Populations.
  • One of the following:
    • EBIO 3080-4, Evolutionary Biology.
    • EBIO 3400-4, Microbiology.
    • EBIO 3770-4, Animal Diversity: Vertebrates.
    • EBIO 3850-4, Animal Diversity: Invertebrates.
    • EBIO 4290-3, Molecular Systematics and Evolution.
    • EBIO 4410-4, Biometry.

Satisfies the Natural Science sequence requirement for all tracks.

Environmental Studies (ENVS)
  • EBIO 1030-3, Biology: A Human Approach 1.
  • EBIO 1040-3, Biology: A Human Approach 2.
  • EBIO 1050-1, Biology: A Human Approach Laboratory.
  • EBIO 2040-4, Principles of Ecology.
  • ENVS 3040-4, Conservation Biology.

Satisfies the Natural Science sequence requirement for all but the following tracks: Computational Biology

Geological Sciences 1 (GEOL)
  • GEOL 1010-3, Introduction to Geology 1.
  • GEOL 1020-3, Introduction to Geology 2.
  • CHEN 1211-3, General Chemistry for Engineers.
  • CHEM 1221-2, Engineering General Chemistry Lab.
  • One of the following:
    • GEOL 3010-3, Introduction to Mineralogy.
    • GEOL 3320-3, Introduction to Geochemistry.
  • a 3 credit-hour upper-division (3000 level or above) GEOL science course from the acceptable course list.

Satisfies the Natural Science sequence requirement for all but the following tracks: Computational Biology

Geological Sciences 2 (GEOL)
  • GEOL 1010-3, Introduction to Geology 1.
  • GEOL 1020-3, Introduction to Geology 2.
  • GEOL 2700-2, Introduction to Field Geology.
  • GEOL 3050-2, Computer-Assisted Geologic Techniques.
  • One of the following:
    • GEOL 3030-3, Introduction to Hydrogeology.
    • GEOL 3430-4, Sedimentology and Stratigraphy.
  • 3 credit-hour upper-division (3000 level or above) GEOL science course from the acceptable course list.

Satisfies the Natural Science sequence requirement for all but the following tracks: Computational Biology

Integrative Physiology (IPHY)
  • EBIO 1210-3, General Biology 1.
  • EBIO 1230-1, General Biology Laboratory 1.
  • EBIO 1220-3, General Biology 2.
  • EBIO 1240-1, General Biology Laboratory 2.
  • Two of the following:
    • IPHY 3060-4, Cell Physiology.
    • IPHY 3410-3, Introduction to Human Anatomy.
    • IPHY 3420-3, Nutrition, Health and Performance. (No longer available)
    • IPHY 3450-3, Comparative Animal Physiology.
    • IPHY 3460-5, Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy.
    • IPHY 4200-3, Physiological Genetics and Genomics.

Satisfies the Natural Science sequence requirement for all tracks.

Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology (MCDB)
  • MCDB 1150-3, Introduction to Cellular and Molecular Biology.
  • MCDB 1151-1, Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology Lab.
  • CHEN 1211-3, General Chemistry for Engineers.
  • CHEM 1221-2, Engineering General Chemistry Lab.
  • MCDB 2150-3, Principles of Genetics.
  • CHEM 3311-4, Organic Chemistry 1.
  • CHEM 3321-1, Laboratory in Organic Chemistry 1.
  • The following is not required, but is highly recommended for students in the Computational Biology track.
    • MCDB 3500-3, Molecular Biology. (No longer available)

Satisfies the Natural Science sequence requirement for all tracks.

Organic Chemistry (CHEM)
  • CHEN 1211-3, General Chemistry for Engineers.
  • CHEM 1221-2, Engineering General Chemistry Lab.
  • CHEM 3311-4, Organic Chemistry 1.
  • CHEM 3321-1, Laboratory in Organic Chemistry 1.

Satisfies the Natural Science sequence requirement for all but the following tracks: Computational Biology

Physical Anthropology (ANTH)
  • EBIO 1210-3, General Biology 1.
  • EBIO 1230-1, General Biology Laboratory 1.
  • ANTH 2010-3, Introduction to Physical Anthropology 1.
  • ANTH 2030-1, Laboratory in Physical Anthropology 1.
  • ANTH 2020-3, Introduction to Physical Anthropology 2.
  • ANTH 2040-1, Laboratory in Physical Anthropology 2.
  • 3 credit-hour upper-division (3000 level or above) science course from the acceptable course list.

Satisfies the Natural Science sequence requirement for all but the following tracks: Computational Biology

Physical Geography (GEOG)
  • GEOG 1001-4, Environmental Systems 1---Climate and Vegetation.
  • GEOG 1011-4, Environmental Systems 2---Landscapes and Water.
  • GEOG 3301-3, Analysis of Climate and Weather Observations.
  • GEOG 3601-3, Principles of Climate.

Satisfies the Natural Science sequence requirement for all but the following tracks: Computational Biology

Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences (SLHS)
  • EBIO 1210-3, General Biology 1.
  • EBIO 1230-1, General Biology Laboratory 1.
  • EBIO 1220-3, General Biology 2.
  • EBIO 1240-1, General Biology Laboratory 2.
  • IPHY 3410-3, Introduction to Human Anatomy. (No longer available)
  • SLHS 3116-3, Speech Science.
  • SLHS 3136-5, Speech and Hearing Science. (No longer available)

Satisfies the Natural Science sequence requirement for all tracks.

General Physics (PHYS)
  • PHYS 1110-4, General Physics 1.
  • PHYS 1120-4, General Physics 2.
  • PHYS 1140-1, Experimental Physics 1.
  • 3 credit-hour upper-division (3000 level or above) science course from the acceptable course list.

Satisfies the Natural Science sequence requirement for all but the following tracks: Computational Biology

Physical Science
  • CHEN 1211-3, General Chemistry for Engineers.
  • CHEM 1221-2, Engineering General Chemistry Lab.
  • PHYS 1110-4, General Physics 1.
  • 3 credit-hour upper-division (3000 level or above) science course from the acceptable course list.

Satisfies the Natural Science sequence requirement for all but the following tracks: Computational Biology

The following should be noted:

  • Many of these courses have prerequisites and/or co-requisites that must be satisfied.
  • Petitions will be considered for individual course substitutions in the above sequences as long as a coherent science sequence is maintained.
  • Petitions to create an entirely new science sequence will also be considered. The new sequence must be a coherent sequence of four acceptable non-laboratory science courses, one of which must be an upper-division (3000 level or above) course.

3.2.2 Acceptable Natural Science Courses

All of the following are acceptable science courses. Courses that have been excluded from this list are those labeled "for non-science majors", courses in writing for the sciences, courses in history of the sciences, courses in science-related policy, courses that are primarily mathematics or computer courses, and other non-science courses. Petitions to include appropriate science courses not listed here will be considered.

Anthropology (ANTH)
  • ANTH 2010-3, Introduction to Physical Anthropology 1.
  • ANTH 2020-3, Introduction to Physical Anthropology 2.
  • ANTH 2030-1, Laboratory in Physical Anthropology 1.
  • ANTH 2040-1, Laboratory in Physical Anthropology 2.
  • ANTH 4120-3, Advanced Physical Anthropology.
Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences (ASTR)
  • ASTR 1030-4, Accelerated Introductory Astronomy 1.
  • ASTR 1040-4, Accelerated Introductory Astronomy 2.
  • ASTR 2000-3, Ancient Astronomies of the World.
  • ASTR 2030-3, Black Holes.
  • ASTR 2040-3, Search for Life in the Universe
  • ASTR 2500-3, Gateway to Space.
  • ASTR 3300-3, Extraterrestrial Life. (No longer available)
  • ASTR 3510-4, Observations and Instrumentation 1.
  • ASTR 3520-4, Observations and Instrumentation 2.
  • ASTR 3710-3, Solar System Formation and Dynamics.
  • ASTR 3720-3, Planets and Their Atmospheres.
  • ASTR 3730-3, Astrophysics 1---Stellar and Interstellar.
  • ASTR 3740-3, Cosmology and Relativity.
  • ASTR 3750-3, Planets, Moons, and Rings.
  • ASTR 3760-3, Solar and Space Physics.
  • ASTR 3830-3, Astrophysics 2---Galactic and Extragalactic.
Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (ATOC)
  • ATOC 3180-3, Aviation Meteorology. (No longer available)
  • ATOC 3300-3, Analysis of Climate and Weather Observations.
  • ATOC 3500-3, Air Chemistry and Pollution.
  • ATOC 3600-3, Principles of Climate.
  • ATOC 3720-3, Planets and Their Atmospheres.
  • ATOC 4215-3, Descriptive Physical Oceanography.
  • ATOC 4720-3, Introduction to Atmospheric Physics and Dynamics.
  • ATOC 4750-3, Desert Meteorology and Climate.
Chemistry and Biochemistry (CHEM)
  • CHEM 1111-5, General Chemistry 1. (No longer available)
  • CHEM 1113-4, General Chemistry 1.
  • CHEM 1114-1, Laboratory in General Chemistry 1.
  • CHEM 1131-5, General Chemistry 2. (No longer available)
  • CHEM 1133-4, General Chemistry 2.
  • CHEM 1134-1, Laboratory in General Chemistry 2.
  • CHEM 1151-5, Honors General Chemistry 1. (No longer available)
  • CHEM 1171-5, Honors General Chemistry 2. (No longer available)
  • CHEM 1221-2, Engineering General Chemistry Lab.
  • CHEM 3311-4, Organic Chemistry 1.
  • CHEM 3321-1, Laboratory in Organic Chemistry 1.
  • CHEM 3331-4, Organic Chemistry 2.
  • CHEM 3341-1, Laboratory in Organic Chemistry 2.
  • CHEM 3351-4, Organic Chemistry 1 for Chemistry and Biochemistry Majors.
  • CHEM 3361-2, Laboratory in Organic Chemistry 1 for Chemistry Majors
  • CHEM 3371-4, Organic Chemistry 2 for Chemistry and Biochemistry Majors.
  • CHEM 3381-2, Laboratory in Organic Chemistry 2 for Chemistry Majors.
  • CHEM 4011-3, Modern Inorganic Chemistry.
  • CHEM 4021-3, Inorganic Laboratory.
  • CHEM 4171-3, Instrumental Analysis.
  • CHEM 4181-4, Instrumental Analysis Laboratory with Environmental Emphasis.
  • CHEM 4411-3, Physical Chemistry with Biochemistry Applications 1.
  • CHEM 4431-3, Physical Chemistry with Biochemistry Applications 2.
  • CHEM 4511-3, Physical Chemistry 1.
  • CHEM 4521-3, Physical Chemistry for Engineers.
  • CHEM 4531-3, Physical Chemistry 2.
  • CHEM 4541-2, Physical Chemistry Laboratory for Engineers. (No longer available)
  • CHEM 4581-1, Physical Chemistry Lab 1.
  • CHEM 4591-2, Physical Chemistry Lab 2.
  • CHEM 4611-3, Survey of Biochemistry.
  • CHEM 4711-3, General Biochemistry 1.
  • CHEM 4731-3, General Biochemistry 2.
  • CHEM 4751-3, Current Topics in Biochemical Research.
  • CHEM 4761-4, Biochemistry Laboratory.
  • CHEM 4791-3, Bioorganic Chemistry in Biotechnology.
Chemical Engineering (CHEN)
  • CHEN 1211-3, General Chemistry for Engineers.
  • CHEN 2810-3, Biology for Engineers.
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EBIO)
  • EBIO 1030-3, A Human Approach 1
  • EBIO 1040-3, A Human Approach 2
  • EBIO 1050-1, A Human Approach Laboratory
  • EBIO 1210-3, General Biology 1.
  • EBIO 1220-3, General Biology 2. (No longer available)
  • EBIO 1230-1, General Biology Laboratory 1.
  • EBIO 1240-1, General Biology Laboratory 2.
  • EBIO 2010-1-3, Environmental Issues and Biology.
  • EBIO 2040-4, Principles of Ecology.
  • EBIO 2070-4, Genetics: Molecules to Populations.
  • EBIO 2500-4, Introduction to Horticulture. (No longer available)
  • EBIO 2590-2, Plants and Society.
  • EBIO 2640-5, Honors Principles of Ecology. (No longer available)
  • EBIO 2670-5, Honors Genetics: Molecules to Populations. (No longer available)
  • EBIO 3040-4, Conservation Biology.
  • EBIO 3080-4, Evolutionary Biology.
  • EBIO 3110-3, Population and Community Ecology.
  • EBIO 3170-3-4, Arctic and Alpine Ecology.
  • EBIO 3175-1, Arctic and Alpine Ecology Lab.
  • EBIO 3180-3, Global Ecology.
  • EBIO 3190-3, Tropical Marine Ecology.
  • EBIO 3240-4, Animal Behavior.
  • EBIO 3270-3, Ecosystem Ecology.
  • EBIO 3400-4, Microbiology.
  • EBIO 3500-4, Plant Biodiversity and Evolution. (No longer available)
  • EBIO 3510-4, Plant Anatomy and Development. (No longer available)
  • EBIO 3520-4, Plant Systematics. (No longer available)
  • EBIO 3530-4, Functional Plant Biology. (No longer available)
  • EBIO 3630-4, Parasitology.
  • EBIO 3680-5, Honors Evolutionary Biology.
  • EBIO 3770-4, Animal Diversity: Vertebrates.
  • EBIO 3850-4, Animal Diversity: Invertebrates. (No longer available)
  • EBIO 4020-3, Stream Biology.
  • EBIO 4030-3, Limnology.
  • EBIO 4060-3, Landscape Ecology.
  • EBIO 4080-4, Freshwater Phycology
  • EBIO 4090-2, Coral Reef Ecology.
  • EBIO 4100-3, Advanced Ecology.
  • EBIO 4110-3, Advanced Ecology.
  • EBIO 4120-2-4, Advanced Ecology.
  • EBIO 4140-3, Plant Ecology.
  • EBIO 4150-1-2, Techniques in Ecology.
  • EBIO 4160-3, Introduction to Biogeochemistry.
  • EBIO 4175-3, The Scientific Basis for Ecosystem Management of Public Lands.
  • EBIO 4180-3, Ecological Perspectives on Global Change. (No longer available)
  • EBIO 4290-3, Molecular Systematics and Evolution.
  • EBIO 4410-4, Biometry.
  • EBIO 4500-4, Plan Biodiversity and Evolution.
  • EBIO 4510-4, Plant Anatomy and Development.
  • EBIO 4520-4, Plant Systematics.
  • EBIO 4530-4, Functional Plant Biology.
  • EBIO 4550-4, Plant Eco-Evo-Devo.
  • EBIO 4570-3, Advanced Plant Physiology.
  • EBIO 4660-4, Insect Biology.
  • EBIO 4740-3, Biology of Amphibians and Reptiles.
  • EBIO 4750-4, Ornithology.
  • EBIO 4760-4, Mammalogy.
Environmental Studies (ENVS)
  • ENVS 3040-4, Conservation Biology.
Geography (GEOG)
  • GEOG 1001-4, Environmental Systems 1---Climate and Vegetation.
  • GEOG 1011-4, Environmental Systems 2---Landscapes and Water.
  • GEOG 3251-3, Mountain Geography.
  • GEOG 3301-3, Analysis of Climate and Weather Observations.
  • GEOG 3351-3, Biogeography. (No longer available)
  • GEOG 3511-4, Introduction to Hydrology.
  • GEOG 3601-3, Principles of Climate.
  • GEOG 4201-3, Biometeorology.
  • GEOG 4211-3, Physical Climatology---Principles. (No longer available)
  • GEOG 4231-4, Physical Climatology/Field Methods. (No longer available)
  • GEOG 4241-4, Principles of Geomorphology.
  • GEOG 4251-4, Fluvial Geomorphology.
  • GEOG 4261-3, Glaciers and Permafrost.
  • GEOG 4271-3, The Artic Climate System.
  • GEOG 4291-3-4, Mountain Geomorphology. (No longer available)
  • GEOG 4311-3, Watershed Biogeochemistry.
  • GEOG 4321-3-4, Snow Hydrology.
  • GEOG 4331-3-4, Mountain Climatology.
  • GEOG 4371-3, Forest Geography: Principles and Dynamics.
  • GEOG 4401-3, Soils Geography.
  • GEOG 4411-3, Methods of Soil Analysis. (No longer available)
  • GEOG 4501-3, Water Resources and Water Management of Western United States.
Geological Sciences (GEOL)
  • GEOL 1010-3, Introduction to Geology 1.
  • GEOL 1020-3, Introduction to Geology 2.
  • GEOL 1030-1, Introduction to Geology Laboratory 1.
  • GEOL 1040-3, Geology of Colorado.
  • GEOL 1060-3, Global Change---An Earth Science Perspective.
  • GEOL 2001-4, Planet Earth.
  • GEOL 2040-3, The Search for Life in the Universe. (Was GEOL 3300)
  • GEOL 2100-3, Environmental Geology.
  • GEOL 2110-4, Physical Science of the Earth System. (No longer available)
  • GEOL 2700-2, Introduction to Field Geology.
  • GEOL 3010-3, Introduction to Mineralogy.
  • GEOL 3020-3, Petrology.
  • GEOL 3030-3, Introduction to Hydrogeology.
  • GEOL 3040-3, Global Change: The Recent Geological Record.
  • GEOL 3050-2, Computer-Assisted Geologic Techniques.
  • GEOL 3060-3, Geology of U.S. National Parks. (No longer available)
  • GEOL 3070-3, Introduction to Oceanography.
  • GEOL 3120-4, Structural Geology.
  • GEOL 3130-3, Global Warming: Understanding the Forecast.
  • GEOL 3230-3, Earth Materials.
  • GEOL 3300-3, Extraterrestrial Life. (Being replaced with GEOL 2040)
  • GEOL 3320-3, Introduction to Geochemistry.
  • GEOL 3410-3, Paleobiology.
  • GEOL 3430-4, Sedimentology and Stratigraphy.
  • GEOL 3500-3, Earth Resources and the Environment.
  • GEOL 3520-3, Environmental Issues in Geosciences.
  • GEOL 3540-3, Introduction to Petroleum Geology.
  • GEOL 3720-3, Evolution of Life: The Geological Record.
  • GEOL 3820-3, The Fluid Earth.
  • GEOL 3950-3, Natural Catastrophes and Geologic Hazards.
  • GEOL 4060-4, Oceanography.
  • GEOL 4070-3, Paleoclimatology.
  • GEOL 4080-3, Societal Problems and Earth Sciences. (No longer available)
  • GEOL 4093-4, Remote Sensing of the Environment.
  • GEOL 4130-3, Principles of Geophysics.
  • GEOL 4160-3, Introduction to Biogeochemistry.
  • GEOL 4200-3, Advanced Mineralogy. (No longer available)
  • GEOL 4241-4, Principles of Geomorphology.
  • GEOL 4270-3, Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry.
  • GEOL 4291-3-4, Mountain Geomorphology. (No longer available)
  • GEOL 4330-3, Cosmochemistry.
  • GEOL 4360-3, Glacial Geology. (No longer available)
  • GEOL 4474-4, Vertebrate Paleontology.
  • GEOL 4540-4, Petroleum Geology. (No longer available)
  • GEOL 4550-3, Petroleum Reservoir Characterization and Modeling.
  • GEOL 4640-3, Glaciology. (No longer available)
  • GEOL 4670-3, Isotope Geology.
  • GEOL 4711-2, Igneous and Metamorphic Field Geology.
  • GEOL 4712-2, Structural Field Geology.
  • GEOL 4714-2, Field Geophysics.
  • GEOL 4715-2, Field Techniques in Surficial Geology and Geohydrology.
  • GEOL 4716-2, Environmental Field Geochemistry.
  • GEOL 4717-2, Field Seminar in Geology and Tectonics.
Integrative Physiology (IPHY)
  • IPHY 2010-1-3, Seminar in Integrative Physiology.
  • IPHY 2420-3, Nutrition for Health and Performance.
  • IPHY 2600-2, Introduction to Research Methods. (No longer available)
  • IPHY 2910-1-3, Practicum in Integrative Physiology.
  • IPHY 3060-4, Cell Physiology.
  • IPHY 3130-3, Environmental Animal Physiology.
  • IPHY 3410-3, Introduction to Human Anatomy.
  • IPHY 3415-2, Human Anatomy Laboratory.
  • IPHY 3430-3, Introduction to Human Physiology.
  • IPHY 3435-2, Human Physiology Laboratory.
  • IPHY 3440-3, Nutrition for Health and Wellness.
  • IPHY 3450-3, Comparative Animal Physiology.
  • IPHY 3460-5, Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy.
  • IPHY 3470-3, Human Physiology 1.
  • IPHY 3480-3, Human Physiology 2.
  • IPHY 3660-3, Dynamics of Motor Learning.
  • IPHY 3730-3, Brain and Behavior. (No longer available)
  • IPHY 3800-3, Forensic Biology.
  • IPHY 3810-1, Forensic Biology Laboratory.
  • IPHY 4200-3, Physiological Genetics and Genomics.
  • IPHY 4440-4, Endocrinology.
  • IPHY 4470-3, Biology of Human Reproduction.
  • IPHY 4480-3, Comparative Reproduction.
  • IPHY 4500-4, Histology: Cells and Tissues. (No longer available)
  • IPHY 4540-5, Biomechanics.
  • IPHY 4600-4, Immunology.
  • IPHY 4650-5, Exercise Physiology.
  • IPHY 4720-4, Neurophysiology.
  • IPHY 4730-3, Motor Control. (No longer available)
  • IPHY 4740-3, Theory of Motor Skill Learning.
  • IPHY 4750-3, Exercise and Sport Psychology. (No longer available)
  • IPHY 4770-3-4, Mind--Body Health.
Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology (MCDB)
  • MCDB 1030-3, Plagues, People, and Microorganisms.
  • MCDB 1041-3, Fundamentals of Human Genetics.
  • MCDB 1042-3, Biological Basis of Human Disease. (No longer available)
  • MCDB 1111-4, Biofundamentals: The Evolutionary, Molecular, and Cellular Basis of Life. (No longer available)
  • MCDB 1150-3, Introduction to Cellular and Molecular Biology.
  • MCDB 1151-1, Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology Lab.
  • MCDB 1161-2, From Dirt to DNA: Phage Genomics Laboratory.
  • MCDB 2115-3, Life Science of Earth Systems. (No longer available)
  • MCDB 2150-3, Principles of Genetics.
  • MCDB 2151-1, Principles of Genetics Laboratory.
  • MCDB 2161-2, From DNA to Genes, Phage Genomics Laboratory II.
  • MCDB 3100-3, Methods in Developmental Genetics. (No longer available)
  • MCDB 3120-3, Cell Biology. (No longer available)
  • MCDB 3135-3, Molecular Cell Biology I.
  • MCDB 3140-2, Cell Biology Laboratory.
  • MCDB 3145-3, Molecular Cell Biology II.
  • MCDB 3150-3, Biology of the Cancer Cell.
  • MCDB 3280-3, Molecular Cell Physiology.
  • MCDB 3330-3, Evolution and Creationism.
  • MCDB 3350-3, Fertility, Sterility, and Early Mammalian Development.
  • MCDB 3500-3, Molecular Biology. (No longer available)
  • MCDB 3650-3, The Brain – From Molecules to Behavior.
  • MCDB 4111-3, Experimental Design and Research in Cell and Molecular Biology.
  • MCDB 4130-3, Biological Electron Microscopy: Principles and Recent Advances. (No longer available)
  • MCDB 4140-3, Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology.
  • MCDB 4300-3, Immunology.
  • MCDB 4330-3, Bacterial Disease Mechanisms.
  • MCDB 4350-3, Microbial Diversity and the Biosphere.
  • MCDB 4410-3, Human Molecular Genetics.
  • MCDB 4426-3, Cell Signaling and Developmental Regulation.
  • MCDB 4444-3, Cellular Basis of Disease.
  • MCDB 4471-3, Mechanisms of Gene Regulation in Eukaryotes.
  • MCDB 4520-3, Bioinformatics and Genomics.
  • MCDB 4550-3, Cellular and Molecular Motion, A Biophysical Approach.
  • MCDB 4600-3, Molecular Approaches to Human Diseases.
  • MCDB 4615-3, Biology of Stem Cells.
  • MCDB 4650-3, Developmental Biology.
  • MCDB 4660-2, Developmental Biology Laboratory. (No longer available)
  • MCDB 4680-3, Mechanisms of Aging.
  • MCDB 4750-3, Animal Virology.
  • MCDB 4777-3, Molecular Neurobiology.
  • MCDB 4790-3, Experimental Embryology.
  • MCDB 4810-3, Insane in the Membrane: The Biology and Biophysics of the Membrane.
Physics (PHYS)
  • PHYS 1110-4, General Physics 1.
  • PHYS 1120-4, General Physics 2.
  • PHYS 1140-1, Experimental Physics 1.
  • PHYS 1150-1, Experimental Physics 2.
  • PHYS 1170-4, Honors General Physics 1. (No longer available)
  • PHYS 1180-4, Honors General Physics 2. (No longer available)
  • PHYS 1300-3, Experiment in Physics.
  • PHYS 1700-3, Physics: Its History and Philosophy. (No longer available)
  • PHYS 2130-3, General Physics 3.
  • PHYS 2150-1, Experimental Physics.
  • PHYS 2160-1, Experimental Physics.
  • PHYS 2170-3, Foundations of Modern Physics.
  • PHYS 2210-3, Classical Mechanics and Mathematical Methods 1.
  • PHYS 3210-3, Classical Mechanics and Mathematical Methods 2.
  • PHYS 3220-3, Quantum Mechanics and Atomic Physics 1.
  • PHYS 3310-3, Principles of Electricity and Magnetism 1.
  • PHYS 3320-3, Principles of Electricity and Magnetism 2.
  • PHYS 3330-2, Electronics for the Physical Sciences.
  • PHYS 3340-3, Introductory Research in Optical Physics.
  • PHYS 4110-3, Analytical Techniques for Materials Analysis. (No longer available)
  • PHYS 4130-3, Biological Electron Microscopy: Principles and Recent Advances.
  • PHYS 4150-3, Plasma Physics.
  • PHYS 4230-3, Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics.
  • PHYS 4340-3, Introduction to Solid State Physics.
  • PHYS 4410-3, Quantum Mechanics and Atomic Physics 2.
  • PHYS 4420-3, Nuclear and Particle Physics.
  • PHYS 4430-3, Introduction to Research in Modern Physics.
  • PHYS 4450-3, History and Philosophy of Physics.
  • PHYS 4510-3, Optics.
Psychology (PSYC)
  • PSYC 2012-3, Biological Psychology 1.
  • PSYC 2022-3, Biological Psychology 2.
  • PSYC 3102-3, Behavioral Genetics.
  • PSYC 4032-3, Neurobiology of Learning and Memory. (No longer available)
  • PSYC 4052-4, Behavioral Neuroscience.
  • PSYC 4062-3, The Neurobiology of Stress.
  • PSYC 4072-3, Clinical Neuroscience: A Clinical and Pathological Perspective. (No longer available)
  • PSYC 4092-3, Hormones and Behavior. (No longer available)
  • PSYC 4112-3, Behavioral Genetics Laboratory. (No longer available)
  • PSYC 4122-3, Quantitative Genetics.
  • PSYC 4132-3, Behavioral Neuropharmacology.
Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences (SLHS)
  • SLHS 3136-5, Speech and Hearing Science.
  • SLHS 4502-3, Language Disorders: Child and Adult.
  • SLHS 4512-3, Speech Disorders: Voice, Cleft Palate, Motor Disorders, Stuttering.
  • SLHS 4576-3, Communication Neuroscience.

3.3 Computer Science Foundation

All of the following courses are required for all tracks:

  • CSCI 1000-1, Computer Science as a Field of Work and Study.
  • CSCI 1300-4, Computer Science 1: Programming.
  • CSCI 2270-4, Computer Science 2: Data Structures.
  • CSCI 2400-4, Computer Systems.
  • CSCI 3104-4, Algorithms.
  • CSCI 3155-4, Principles of Programming Languages.

Note: CSCI 4593-3, Computer Organization, may be taken in place of CSCI 2400.

3.4 Computer Science Tracks

Computer Science is an exceptionally broad discipline, but it is also a discipline with many opportunities for specialization. Tracks help students focus their coursework and interests on coherent areas of specialization.

The requirements of at least one of the following Computer Science Tracks must be met. Each track requires completion of a Track Foundation, a Track Core and a Track Capstone. Some tracks may have additional requirements.

3.4.1 General Computing (CTG)

3.4.1.1  General Computing Core

Seven (7) General Computing track core courses selected from the following are required (21-22 hours):

  • CSCI 3202-3, Introduction to Artificial Intelligence.
  • CSCI 3287-3, Database and Information Systems.
  • CSCI 3308-3, Software Engineering Methods and Tools.
  • CSCI 3434-3, Theory of Computation.
  • CSCI 3656-3, Numerical Computation.
  • CSCI 3753-4, Operating Systems.
  • CSCI 4273-3, Network Systems.
  • CSCI 4448-3, Object-Oriented Analysis and Design.
  • CSCI 4593-3, Computer Organization.
  • CSCI 4839-3, User-Centered Design.

Students may petition the undergraduate advisor to two count two upper division CSCI courses not on the above list as General Computing Core.

3.4.1.2 General Computing Capstone

Senior Capstone or Senior Thesis is required (8 hours total):

Senior Capstone:

  • CSCI 4308-4, Software Engineering Project 1 and
  • CSCI 4318-4, Software Engineering Project 2.

This sequence must be taken contiguously and may not be taken before the senior year. Prerequisites for Senior Project include the successful completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours of Computer Science Foundation, Track Foundation, Track Core and Computer Science Electives. See Senior Project for more information.

Senior Thesis:

  • CSCI 4950-4, Senior Thesis.
  • CSCI 4950-4, Senior Thesis.

Senior Thesis may not be taken before the senior year. Prerequisites for Senior Thesis include the successful completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours of Computer Science Foundation, Track Foundation, Track Core and Computer Science Electives. See Senior Thesis for more information.

3.4.1.3 Computer Science Electives

Additional approved upper-division Computer Science courses to bring the total number of all credit hours taken to satisfy the Computer Science Foundation, Track Foundation, Track Core, Track Capstone and Computer Science Electives to 58 or more.  See approved list below.

3.4.2 Computational Biology (CBI)

3.4.2.1 Computational Biology Foundation

All of the following courses are required (10 hours):

  • CSCI 4314-3, Algorithms for Molecular Biology.
  • CSCI 4317-3, Genome Databases: Mining and Management.
  • CSCI 4810-1, Seminar in Computational Biology and Health Informatics.
3.4.2.2 Computational Biology Core

Four (4) additional courses selected from the following are required (12 hours):

  • CSCI 3202-3, Introduction to Artificial Intelligence.
  • CSCI 3287-3, Database and Information Systems.
  • CSCI 3308-3, Software Engineering Methods and Tools.
  • CSCI 3434-3, Theory of Computation.
  • CSCI 3656-3, Numerical Computation.
  • CSCI 4576-4, High-Performance Scientific Computing 1.
  • CSCI 4446-3, Chaotic Dynamics.
  • CSCI 4448-3, Object-Oriented Analysis and Design.
  • CSCI 4839-3, User-Centered Design.
  • APPM 4390-3, Modeling in Mathematical Biology.
  • MCDB 4520-3, Bioinformatics and Genomics.
3.4.2.3 Computational Biology Capstone

Senior Capstone or Senior Thesis is required (8 hours total):

Senior Capstone:

  • CSCI 4308-4, Software Engineering Project 1 and
  • CSCI 4318-4, Software Engineering Project 2.

This sequence must be taken contiguously and may not be taken before the senior year. Prerequisites for Senior Project include the successful completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours of Computer Science Foundation, Track Foundation, Track Core and Computer Science Electives. See Senior Project for more information.

Senior Thesis:

  • CSCI 4950-4, Senior Thesis.
  • CSCI 4950-4, Senior Thesis.

Senior Thesis may not be taken before the senior year. Prerequisites for Senior Thesis include the successful completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours of Computer Science Foundation, Track Foundation, Track Core and Computer Science Electives. See Senior Thesis for more information.

3.4.2.4  Computer Science Electives

Additional approved upper-division Computer Science courses to bring the total number of all credit hours taken to satisfy the Computer Science Foundation, Track Foundation, Track Core, Track Capstone and Computer Science Electives to 58 or more.  See approved list below.

3.4.3 Computational Science and Engineering (CSE)

3.4.3.1  Computational Science and Engineering Foundation

All of the following courses are required (10 hours):

  • CSCI 3308-3, Software Engineering Methods and Tools.
  • CSCI 3656-3, Numerical Computation.
  • CSCI 4576-4, High-Performance Scientific Computing 1
3.4.3.2  Computational Science and Engineering Core

Three (3) courses selected from the following are required (9-10 hours):

3.4.3.3 Computational Science and Engineering Capstone

Senior Capstone or Senior Thesis is required (8 hours total):

Senior Capstone:

  • CSCI 4308-4, Software Engineering Project 1 and
  • CSCI 4318-4, Software Engineering Project 2.

This sequence must be taken contiguously and may not be taken before the senior year. Prerequisites for Senior Project include the successful completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours of Computer Science Foundation, Track Foundation, Track Core and Computer Science Electives. See Senior Project for more information.

Senior Thesis:

  • CSCI 4950-4, Senior Thesis.
  • CSCI 4950-4, Senior Thesis.

Senior Thesis may not be taken before the senior year. Prerequisites for Senior Thesis include the successful completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours of Computer Science Foundation, Track Foundation, Track Core and Computer Science Electives. See Senior Thesis for more information.

3.4.3.4 Computer Science Electives

Additional approved upper-division Computer Science courses to bring the total number of all credit hours taken to satisfy the Computer Science Foundation, Track Foundation, Track Core, Track Capstone and Computer Science Electives to 58 or more.  See approved list below

3.4.4 Human-Centered Computing (HCC)

3.4.4.1 Human-Centered Computing Foundation

All of the following courses are required (7-9 hours):

  • CSCI 3002-3, Human-Centered Computing Foundations.
  • CSCI 3112-1-3, Human-Centered Computing Professional Development.
  • CSCI 3702-3, Cognitive Science.
3.4.4.2 Human-Centered Computing Core

Three (3) courses selected from the following are required (9 hours):

  • CSCI 3202-3, Introduction to Artificial Intelligence.
  • CSCI 3287-3, Database and Information Systems.
  • CSCI 3308-3, Software Engineering Methods and Tools.
  • CSCI 4322-3, Things That Think.
  • CSCI 4332-3, Game Programming.
  • CSCI 4448-3, Object-Oriented Analysis and Design.
  • CSCI 4839-3, User-Centered Design
3.4.4.3 Human-Centered Computing Capstone

Senior Capstone or Senior Thesis is required (8 hours total):

Senior Capstone:

  • CSCI 4308-4, Software Engineering Project 1 and
  • CSCI 4318-4, Software Engineering Project 2.

This sequence must be taken contiguously and may not be taken before the senior year. Prerequisites for Senior Project include the successful completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours of Computer Science Foundation, Track Foundation, Track Core and Computer Science Electives. See Senior Project for more information.

Senior Thesis:

  • CSCI 4950-4, Senior Thesis.
  • CSCI 4950-4, Senior Thesis.

Senior Thesis may not be taken before the senior year. Prerequisites for Senior Thesis include the successful completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours of Computer Science Foundation, Track Foundation, Track Core and Computer Science Electives. See Senior Thesis for more information.

3.4.4.4 Computer Science Electives

Additional approved upper-division Computer Science courses to bring the total number of all credit hours taken to satisfy the Computer Science Foundation, Track Foundation, Track Core, Track Capstone and Computer Science Electives to 58 or more.  See approved list below.

3.4.5 Networked Devices and Systems (NDS)

3.4.5.1 Networked Devices and Systems Foundation

All of the following courses are required (10 hours):

  • CSCI 3753-4, Operating Systems.
  • CSCI 4113-3, UNIX System Administration.
  • CSCI 4273-3, Network Systems.
3.4.5.2 Networked Devices and Systems Core

Four (4) courses selected from the following are required (12 hours):

  • CSCI 3287-3, Database and Information Systems.
  • CSCI 3308-3, Software Engineering Methods and Tools.
  • CSCI 3434-3, Theory of Computation.
  • CSCI 4448-3, Object-Oriented Analysis and Design.
  • CSCI 4593-3, Computer Organization.
  • CSCI 4753-3, Computer Performance Modeling.
3.4.5.3 Networked Devices and Systems Capstone

Senior Capstone or Senior Thesis is required (8 hours total):

Track Capstone:

  • CSCI 4123-3, Network Laboratory
  • CSCI 4133-3, Security Laboratory
  • CSCI 4143-2, Principles of Telecommunications Policy.

Prerequisites for Networked Devices and Systems Labs and Seminar are the successful completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours of Computer Science Foundation, Track Foundation, Track Core and Computer Science Electives.

Senior Thesis

  • CSCI 4950-4, Senior Thesis.
  • CSCI 4950-4, Senior Thesis.

Senior Thesis may not be taken before the senior year. Prerequisites for Senior Thesis include the successful completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours of Computer Science Foundation, Track Foundation, Track Core and Computer Science Electives. See Senior Thesis for more information.

3.4.5.4 Computer Science Electives

Additional approved upper-division Computer Science courses to bring the total number of all credit hours taken to satisfy the Computer Science Foundation, Track Foundation, Track Core, Track Capstone and Computer Science Electives to 58 or more.  See approved list below.

3.4.6 Software Engineering (SEN)

3.4.6.1 Software Engineering Foundation

Both of the following courses are required (6 hours):

  • CSCI 3308-3, Software Engineering Methods and Tools.
  • CSCI 4448-3, Object-Oriented Analysis and Design.
3.4.6.2 Software Engineering Core

Five (5) courses selected from the following are required (15-16 hours):

  • CSCI 3202-3, Introduction to Artificial Intelligence.
  • CSCI 3287-3, Database and Information Systems.
  • CSCI 3753-4, Operating Systems.
  • CSCI 4113-3, UNIX System Administration.
  • CSCI 4229-3, Computer Graphics.
  • CSCI 4273-3, Network Systems.
  • CSCI 4555-3, Compiler Construction.
  • CSCI 4839-3, User-Centered Design.
3.4.6.3 Software Engineering Capstone

Senior Capstone or Senior Thesis is required (8 hours total):

Senior Capstone:

  • CSCI 4308-4, Software Engineering Project 1 and
  • CSCI 4318-4, Software Engineering Project 2.

This sequence must be taken contiguously and may not be taken before the senior year. Prerequisites for Senior Project include the successful completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours of Computer Science Foundation, Track Foundation, Track Core and Computer Science Electives. See Senior Project for more information.

Senior Thesis:

  • CSCI 4950-4, Senior Thesis.
  • CSCI 4950-4, Senior Thesis.

Senior Thesis may not be taken before the senior year. Prerequisites for Senior Thesis include the successful completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours of Computer Science Foundation, Track Foundation, Track Core and Computer Science Electives. See Senior Thesis for more information.

3.4.6.4 Computer Science Electives

Additional approved upper-division Computer Science courses to bring the total number of all credit hours taken to satisfy the Computer Science Foundation, Track Foundation, Track Core, Track Capstone and Computer Science Electives to 58 or more.  See approved list below.

3.4.7 Systems (SYS)

3.4.7.1 Systems Foundation

All of the following courses are required (10 hours):

3.4.7.2 Systems Core

Three (3) courses selected from the following are required (9 hours):

  • CSCI 3308-3, Software Engineering Methods and Tools.
  • CSCI 4229-3, Computer Graphics.
  • CSCI 4555-3, Compiler Construction.
  • CSCI 4593-3, Computer Organization.
  • CSCI 4753-3, Computer Performance Modeling.
  • CSCI 4830-3, CS Special Topics: Ethical Hacking
  • ECEN 4613-3, Embedded System Design.
3.4.7.3 Systems Capstone

Senior Capstone or Senior Thesis is required (8 hours total):

Senior Capstone:

  • CSCI 4308-4, Software Engineering Project 1 and
  • CSCI 4318-4, Software Engineering Project 2.

This sequence must be taken contiguously and may not be taken before the senior year. Prerequisites for Senior Project include the successful completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours of Computer Science Foundation, Track Foundation, Track Core and Computer Science Electives. See Senior Project for more information.

Senior Thesis:

  • CSCI 4950-4, Senior Thesis.
  • CSCI 4950-4, Senior Thesis.

Senior Thesis may not be taken before the senior year. Prerequisites for Senior Thesis include the successful completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours of Computer Science Foundation, Track Foundation, Track Core and Computer Science Electives. See Senior Thesis for more information.

3.4.7.4 Computer Science Electives

Additional approved upper-division Computer Science courses to bring the total number of all credit hours taken to satisfy the Computer Science Foundation, Track Foundation, Track Core, Track Capstone and Computer Science Electives to 58 or more.  See approved list below.

3.5 Computer Science Electives for all tracks

Additional approved upper-division Computer Science courses to bring the total number of all credit hours taken to satisfy the Computer Science Foundation, Track Foundation, Track Core, Track Capstone and Computer Science Electives to 58 or more. Approved courses include

  • CSCI 3002-3, Human-Centered Computing Foundations.
  • CSCI 3112-1, Human-Centered Computing Professional Development.
  • CSCI 3202-3, Introduction to Artificial Intelligence.
  • CSCI 3287-3, Database and Information Systems.
  • CSCI 3308-3, Software Engineering Methods and Tools.
  • CSCI 3434-3, Theory of Computation.
  • CSCI 3656-3, Numerical Computation.
  • CSCI 3702-3, Cognitive Science.
  • CSCI 3753-4, Operating Systems.
  • CSCI 4113-3, UNIX System Administration.
  • CSCI 4123-3, Network Laboratory.
  • CSCI 4133-3, Security Laboratory.
  • CSCI 4143-2, Principles of Telecommunications Policy.
  • CSCI 4229-3, Computer Graphics.
  • CSCI 4239-3, Advanced Computer Graphics.
  • CSCI 4273-3, Network Systems.
  • CSCI 4302-3, Advanced Robotics.
  • CSCI 4312-3, Health Informatics.
  • CSCI 4314-3, Algorithms for Molecular Biology.
  • CSCI 4317-3, Genome Databases: Mining and Management.
  • CSCI 4322-3, Things That Think.
  • CSCI 4332-3, Game Programming.
  • CSCI 4446-3, Chaotic Dynamics.
  • CSCI 4448-3, Object-Oriented Analysis and Design.
  • CSCI 4502-3, Data Mining.
  • CSCI 4555-3, Compiler Construction.
  • CSCI 4576-4, High-Performance Scientific Computing 1.
  • CSCI 4586-4, High-Performance Scientific Computing 2.
  • CSCI 4593-3, Computer Organization.
  • CSCI 4753-3, Computer Performance Modeling.
  • CSCI 4809-3, Computer Animation.
  • CSCI 4810-1, Seminar in Computational Biology and Health Informatics.
  • CSCI 4830-3, Special Topics in Computer Science.
  • CSCI 4839-3, User-Centered Design.
  • ECEN 2350-3, Digital Logic.
  • ECEN 4613-3, Embedded System Design.
  • ASEN 4128-3, Human Factors in Engineering and Design
  • Other upper-division Computer Science courses (CSCI courses numbered 3000 through 4999), if approved by an undergraduate advisor.
  • First-year graduate Computer Science courses (CSCI courses numbered 5000 through 5999), if approved by an undergraduate advisor.

4 Additional Requirements

4.1 Credit Hours and Free Elective Credit

Satisfying all the other course requirements as described above typically adds up to a minimum of 116 credit hours, the exact number depending on specific courses selected and/or transfer credit. This typically leaves around 12 hours for "free electives". Students may take:

  • Any acceptable courses, bringing the total credit hours up to 128 or more.

All courses are considered "acceptable" except as noted in the following list:

  • Co-op work experience does not count towards these 128 hours, nor does any other work experience.

4.2 Minimum Grades

Students need to have the following grade point averages:

  • A cumulative GPA of 2.25 (C) or better in all CSCI courses taken at CU.
  • A cumulative GPA of 2.25 (C) or better in all courses attempted at CU.
  • A cumulative GPA of 2.25 (C) or better in all CU courses used to satisfy graduation requirements.

Students need to have the following grades in individual courses:

  • A grade of C- or better is required in each Computer Science Foundation course, as well as in each course used to satisfy the Track Foundation and Track Core.
  • A grade of C- or better is needed in all prerequisite courses to take a subsequent course.
  • The minimum passing grade for a course that is considered a prerequisite for another required course is C-. If a grade of D+ or lower is received in a course which is prerequisite to another, the student is required to repeat the course until the minimum acceptable course grade has been earned. If a student takes the advanced course, it does not remove the obligation to repeat the prerequisite course, even if the grade earned in the advanced course is a C- or above.
  • In general, aside from the above restrictions, any passing grade, i.e., a D- or better, is good enough to fulfill a degree requirement.
  • A student is not permitted to enroll in a course offered by the College when that course has not been successfully completed in three prior attempts.
  • The Department allows courses counting as free electives to be taken Pass/Fail. Students must petition the Department to take a course Pass/Fail. The College of Engineering and Applied Science has further restrictions on taking a course Pass/Fail. These restrictions are outlined in the College's Grading Policies.

4.3 Residency

  • The last 45 credit hours must be earned on the Boulder campus after admission to the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
  • In addition, unless otherwise explicitly approved, these courses must be taken on the Boulder campus:
    • all Computer Science Foundation courses
    • all courses used to satisfy the Track Foundation
    • all courses used to satisfy the Track Core
    • the Track Capstone

Courses for which transfer credit has been explicitly approved are not required to meet the residency requirement.

4.4 Minimum Academic Preparation Standards (MAPS)

Students must take care of any MAPS (Minimum Academic Preparation Standards) deficiencies. Please see Undergraduate Admissions Minimum Academic Preparation Standards (MAPS) for further information.

4.5 Applying for Graduation

The College of Engineering and Applied Science requires that students apply for graduation by going to the student portal the semester ahead of the semester you plan to graduate. See the undergraduate advisor to see if you have completed the degree requirements.

4.6  Petitions

Students may at times have legitimate reasons to deviate from these degree requirements. A student may request changes to his or her degree requirements by submitting a completed College of Engineering and Applied Science College Petition to undergraduate advisor. The petition must have appropriate approval for the requested changes to take effect.