Throughout the year, RIO coordinates numerous limited campus competitions. These internal competitions are required because many private foundations and federal government programs only allow a limited number of applicants from invited institutions, like the University of Colorado Boulder. The goal is to identify the strongest projects with the highest likelihood of getting funded. Any interested applicant should review the campus procedures below for limited campus competitions.

To sign up for our limited submission bulletin, or if you are aware of a limited program not listed, please email ltdsubs@colorado.edu.

    Anticipated Opportunities and Previous Winners

    Procedures for Limited Campus Competitions

    1. Publicizing Opportunities
      1. Website: RIO maintains a webpage that lists active internal campus competitions; active “Calls for Interest,” which are used to determine if there is sufficient interest on campus to hold an internal competition; and a forecast of anticipated opportunities, based on previous competitions and program cycles.
      2. Email: RIO publishes a bi-weekly "bulletin" via email to campus stakeholders who are interested in receiving notices when limited campus competitions are announced. To subscribe, click here and enter your information. RIO will send "alerts" when we are made aware of opportunities with imminent deadlines that cannot wait on the bi-weekly bulletin. RIO may also notify specific units and stakeholders via email about opportunities that are focused on certain disciplines or research areas.
      3. If individual faculty or staff become aware of limited submission opportunities not posted through the above sources, they should inform RIO by sending information via email to: ltdsubs@colorado.edu
    2. Internal Application Process
      1. RIO determines a reasonable deadline for expressions of interest for funding opportunities in order to determine if a campus-wide competition is needed. Once this deadline has passed and if there is sufficient interest on campus, an internal competition may be held to determine the strongest application(s) to submit to the sponsor on behalf of the University of Colorado Boulder. If no interest is received by the deadline, the university's slot(s) to apply will be granted on a first come, first serve basis. 
      2. The limited campus competitions site lists details of the internal application process, including deadlines and proposal requirements. Requirements are based on sponsor guidelines and will vary. Basic budgets outlining projects costs are sufficient; detailed OCG budgets are not required for internal competitions. Applicants will submit proposals through an online portal with a unique hyperlink, which will be provided on the limited campus competitions site and via email notices.
      3. RIO does not provide any advice or feedback during the internal application process.
      4. If there is insufficient time to administer an internal competition, RIO may render a decision as to whom applies on behalf of the University of Colorado Boulder.
    3. Review Process
      1. Applications are reviewed by the RIO Advisory Board and faculty who have expertise in the relevant subject area(s). The RIO Advisory Board is comprised of faculty members, who are invited by the Vice Chancellor for Research & Innovation, and come from a wide range of disciplines. Based on the evaluations, applicants are selected to submit proposals to sponsors on behalf of the University of Colorado Boulder.
    4. Notification to Applicants
      1. RIO will notify all applicants via email. When possible, all applicants will receive comments and feedback on their proposals to help strengthen applications to sponsors.
      2. Internal winners will be provided with instructions on how to proceed with submission of a full proposal to the sponsor, working in conjunction with the Office of Contracts and Grants (OCG).
      3. RIO will share the names of internal winners when other internal competition applicants, whom were not selected, inquire for collaboration/partnership purposes. The intent is to encourage collaboration to ensure the University of Colorado Boulder is submitting the most competitive proposal possible. Partnerships are at the discretion of the internal PI winner.
    5. Expectations for Internal Winners
      1. Faculty selected to move forward with a limited submission proposal on behalf of the University of Colorado Boulder are required to do so. RIO expects selected faculty to make contact with their OCG Proposal Analyst within one-week of being notified by RIO. This one-week window may be shorter depending on the program deadline. 
      2. Even if a sponsor allows a PI to submit on their own, PIs must submit through OCG.
      3. If, for any reason, an internal winner will not submit a proposal to the sponsor, he/she is required to immediately contact ltdsubs@colorado.edu. Typically, other faculty members who have submitted applications for the internal competition will be invited to apply on behalf of the University of Colorado Boulder so the slot is utilized.
        1. For any instance where an internal winner does not apply and neglects to inform RIO, the dean/director of the internal winner’s respective unit will be notified and this will be taken into consideration for future limited submission opportunities.
      4. If an internal winner wishes to appoint another faculty member as PI before the application is submitted to the sponsor, the internal winner must request approval by sending an explanation to ltdsubs@colorado.edu. Changes in PI must be approved by RIO.
      5. For projects involving cost-share, it is incumbent upon the selected faculty to secure appropriate financial commitments. Cost-share commitments should be in place as part of the internal campus competition process. RIO typically only contributes matching funds for equipment and/or facilities for equipment. Typical matches total $50,000, with $25,000 from RIO and the remaining $25,000 from units or colleges.
      6. RIO expects applicants to send a copy of the submitted proposal to ltdsubs@colorado.edu and to keep RIO informed of the proposal status and if it is funded or not.
      7. As an internal winner, you agree to provide advice, feedback from the sponsor, etc. to the following year’s internal winner and RIO, upon RIO’s request. 

    Active Internal Competitions

    https://www.arts.gov/grants-organizations/research-art-works

    *** NEA ART WORKS grants cannot exceed 50% of the total cost of the project. All grants require a nonfederal match of at least 1 to 1***

    Program Summary

    The National Endowment for the Arts' Office of Research & Analysis makes awards to support research that investigates the value and/or impact of the arts, either as individual components of the U.S. arts ecology or as they interact with each other and/or with other domains of American life.

    In past years, the Research: Art Works category has invited researchers to propose studies that examine topics related to any area(s) on the How Art Works system map. These projects have used quantitative, qualitative, or mixed-methods approaches, and have relied on primary and/or secondary data for analysis. Examples of previously funded research can be found via the "Grant Search" engine or by viewing Research: Art Works Grants Study Findings. In December 2016, moreover, the NEA published a new research agenda covering FY 2017-2021, which included other research questions and topics of interest to the Arts Endowment.

    Research: Art Works offers support for projects in two areas:

    • Track One: Value and Impact. These are matching grants ranging from $10,000-$30,000 for research projects that aim to examine the value and/or impact of the arts in any topic area(s) by using data and methods appropriate to the proposed research questions. Projects relying primarily on experimental/quasi-experimental design methods should apply to Track Two.
    • Track Two: Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Designs. These are matching grants ranging from $30,000-$100,000 for research projects that aim to test the causal or inferred-causal impact of the arts on individual or cohort outcomes by using experimental or quasi-experimental design methods appropriate to the proposed research questions. This Track is only for projects relying primarily on experimental or quasi-experimental research methods. Projects that do not use experimental or quasi-experimental research methods will considered ineligible if submitted under this track.

    Deadlines

    CU Internal Deadline: 11:59pm MST February 1, 2018

    SF-424 to Grants.gov Deadline: 11:59pm EST February 15, 2018

    Materials Submission to Applicant Portal Deadline: 11:59pm EST February 27, 2018

    Internal Application Requirements (all in PDF format)

    Internal application requirements include:

    • 4,000 character (including spaces) Project Narrative
    • One-page project budget justification, including commitment of matching funds
    • One-page summary of team members with bio information

    To access the online application, visit: https://cuboulderovcr.secure-platform.com/a/solicitations/home/3168

    Eligibility

    Nonprofit, tax-exempt 501(c)(3), U.S. organizations; units of state or local government; or federally recognized tribal communities or tribes may apply. Applicants may be arts organizations, local arts agencies, arts service organizations, local education agencies (school districts), and other organizations that can help advance the goals of the National Endowment for the Arts

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    An organization may submit only one application under these FY 2019 Art Works guidelines, with few exceptions.

    Award Information and Duration

    Our grants cannot exceed 50% of the total cost of the project. All grants require a nonfederal match of at least 1 to 1. For example, if an organization receives a $10,000 grant, the total eligible project costs must be at least $20,000 and the organization must provide at least $10,000 toward the project from nonfederal sources.

    Grants generally will range from $10,000 to $100,000. No grant will be made below $10,000. Grants of $100,000 or more will be made only in rare instances, and only for projects that we determine demonstrate exceptional national or regional significance and impact.

    Active Calls for Interest

    Calls for interest are used to gauge campus interest in applying to certain limited programs. An expression of interest is a simple statement via email from a lead PI indicating interest in applying to a specific program. If there are multiple expressions of interest, an internal campus competition may be held with instructions for internal proposals to be sent out at a later time. If you are interested in a program below, please submit an expression of interest by the posted deadline to Ryan Reeves at ltdsubs@colorado.edu.

    NSF Inclusion across the Nation of Communities of Learners of Underrepresented Discoverers in Engineering and Science Alliances (NSF INCLUDES Alliances)

    ***All NSF INCLUDES Alliance proposals must be built upon a foundation developed by one or more NSF INCLUDES Design and Development Launch Pilot project(s).***

    Program Summary

    NSF INCLUDES (Inclusion across the Nation of Communities of Learners of Underrepresented Discoverers in Engineering and Science) is a comprehensive national initiative designed to enhance U.S. leadership in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) discoveries and innovations by focusing on broadening participation in these fields at scale. The vision of NSF INCLUDES is to catalyze the STEM enterprise to collaboratively work for inclusive change, which will result in a STEM workforce that reflects the population of the Nation. The initiative is developing a National Network composed of NSF INCLUDES Design and Development Launch Pilots, NSF INCLUDES Alliances, an NSF INCLUDES Coordination Hub, NSF-funded broadening participation projects, other relevant NSF-funded projects, scholars engaged in broadening participation research, and other organizations that support the development of talent from all sectors of society to build an inclusive STEM workforce. The successful implementation of NSF INCLUDES will result in substantial advances toward a diverse, innovative, and well-prepared STEM workforce to support our Nation’s economy and continued U.S. leadership in the global STEM enterprise. It is anticipated that NSF’s investment will contribute to new and improved STEM career pathways, policies, opportunities to learn, and practices for equity and inclusion. The initiative will be supported by the NSF INCLUDES Coordination Hub (NSF 17-591) that will provide a framework for communication and networking, network assistance and reinforcement, and visibility and expansion for the NSF INCLUDES National Network as a whole.

    This solicitation offers opportunities for NSF INCLUDES Alliances. The critical functions of each NSF INCLUDES Alliance are to:

    1. Develop a vision and strategy (e.g., problem statement and theory of change) for broadening participation in STEM along with relevant metrics of success and key milestones/goals to be achieved during the project’s lifecycle;
    2. Contribute to the knowledge base on broadening participation in STEM through broadening participation and implementation research, sharing project evaluations, data, new scientific findings/discoveries, and promising practices;
    3. Develop multi-stakeholder partnerships and build infrastructure among them to decrease social distance and achieve progress on common goals targeted by the Alliance;
    4. Establish a "backbone" or support organization that provides a framework for communication and networking, network assistance and reinforcement, visibility and expansion of the Alliance and its partners, that will collaborate with the NSF INCLUDES Coordination Hub;
    5. Advance a logic model or other heuristic that identifies Alliance outcomes that reflect implementation of change at scale and progress toward developing an inclusive STEM enterprises

    Deadlines

    CU Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: 11:59pm MST January 30, 2018

    NSF Full Proposal Deadline: 5:00pm MST April 4, 2018

    Eligibility

    An individual may serve as a PI or Co-PI on only two (2) NSF INCLUDES Alliance proposals. 

    All NSF INCLUDES Alliance proposals must be built upon a foundation developed by one or more NSF INCLUDES Design and Development Launch Pilot project(s).

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    An organization may serve as the lead institution on only one Alliance proposal. Organizations that serve as the lead institution on an Alliance proposal may still participate in other Alliance proposals as a collaborating institution.

    Award Information and Duration

    $8,500,000 is available to fund 1 to 3 new NSF INCLUDES Alliance awards.

    New Innovator in Food and Agriculture Research Award

    ***Nominations must be made by the nominee’s institution. Self-nominations are not accepted***

    ***One-to-one cash matching funds from non-federal source are required.***

    Program Summary 

    The Foundation for Food and Agricultural Research (FFAR) seeks nominations for its New Innovator in Food and Agriculture Research Award. With this program, FFAR intends to support and promote the future generation of exceptionally talented and creative new faculty who are conducting critical research and establishing research programs that will lead to expanded availability of food and facilitate the global practice of sustainable agriculture as the world’s population grows to more than 9 billion people by the year 2050. With this award, FFAR seeks to promote career advancement of highly creative and promising new scientists who intend to make a long-term career commitment to research in food and agriculture and bring innovative, ground-breaking research initiatives and thinking to bear on problems facing food and agriculture.

    U.S. institutions of higher education, U.S. nonprofit institutions other than institutions of higher education, and the US Department of Agriculture are invited to nominate up to two applicants for the 2018 New Innovator in Food and Agriculture Research Award.

    Within the scope of the New Innovator program, investigators will have the freedom to explore new avenues of inquiry that arise during the course of their research. Therefore, FFAR is interested in the program of research to be explored and its impact as opposed to a list of very specific aims. It is expected that through this program investigators will have the ability to pursue highly creative ideas, to firmly establish their early lines of research into important food and agriculture scientific areas and provide stability in funding during their critical early career years by reducing the time spent on writing applications.

    Deadlines

    Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: 11:59pm MST January 30, 2018

    FFAR Nomination Deadline: 4:59:59pm EST February 28, 2018

    FFAR Application Deadline: 4:59:59pm EST April 23, 2018

    Eligibility

    Faculty members at eligible institutions with the creative ideas, skills, knowledge, and resources necessary to carry out the proposed research program as Principal Investigator are invited to work with his/her organization to develop an application for support. Faculty member must have been hired on or after August 1, 2014, for his or her tenure-track or equivalent position and may work in any discipline or any department within the organization. Preference will be given to individuals near the onset of their independent research career and who are within eight years of receiving a Ph.D. or equivalent degree. Individuals with significant research experience prior to obtaining their faculty position will not be considered.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Institutions may submit up to two nominees to the 2018 New Innovator Award program.

    Nominations must be made by the nominee’s institution. Self-nominations are not accepted.

    Award Information and Duration

    FFAR anticipates funding no more than a total of ten awards between two categories—‘Target Areas of Research’ and ‘FFAR Challenge Areas’. More information about the award categories can be found on the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research’s website.

    Award amount can be up to $100,000 per year for 3 years with an additional required cash match of $100,000 from non-federal sources for a total award amount of up to 600,000.

    Matching must be from a non-federal source and may not come from funds already designated for other purposes (e.g., a startup package may not be redirected to cover the match). In-kind matching is not permissible for this Program.

    Challenge America Program Description

    ***If an organization applies to the Challenge America category, it may not submit another application to the Art Works category***

    ***NEA CHALLENGE AMERICA grants cannot exceed 50% of the total cost of the project. All grants require a nonfederal match of at least 1 to 1***

    Program Summary

    The Challenge America category offers support primarily to small and mid-sized organizations for projects that extend the reac of the arts to underserved populations -- those whose opportunities to experience the arts are limited by geography, ethnicity, economics, or disability. Age alone (e.g., youth, seniors) does not qualify a group as underserved; at least one of the underserved characteristics noted above also must be present. Please provide details about the underserved audience you select in your application. Grants are available for professional arts programming and for projects that emphasize the potential of the arts in community development.

    This category encourages and supports the following objective:

    • Engagement: Public engagement with, and access to, various forms of excellent art across the nation.

    Deadlines

    CU Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: 11:59pm MST February 14, 2018

    SF-424 to Grants.gov Deadline: April 12, 2018

    Materials Submission to Applicant Portal Deadline: April 24, 2018

    Eligibility

    Nonprofit, tax-exempt 501(c)(3), U.S. organizations; units of state or local government; or federally recognized tribal communities or tribes may apply. Applicants may be arts organizations, local arts agencies, arts service organizations, local education agencies (school districts), and other organizations that can help advance the goals of the National Endowment for the Arts.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    If an organization applies to the Challenge America category, it may not submit another application to the Art Works category.

    You may apply to other National Endowment for the Arts funding opportunities, including Our Townin addition to Challenge America. In each case, the request must be for a distinctly different project or a distinctly different phase of the same project, with a different period of performance and costs.

    Award Information and Duration

    Our grants cannot exceed 50% of the total cost of the project. All grants require a nonfederal match of at least 1 to 1. For example, if an organization receives a $10,000 grant, the total eligible project costs must be at least $20,000 and the organization must provide at least $10,000 toward the project from nonfederal sources.

    http://www.patagonia.com/grant-guidelines.html

    Program Summary

    Patagonia funds only environmental work. We are most interested in making grants to organizations that identify and work on the root causes of problems and that approach issues with a commitment to long-term change. Because we believe that the most direct path to real change is through building grassroots momentum, our funding focuses on organizations that create a strong base of citizen support.

    Patagonia supports small grassroots activist organizations with provocative direct-action agendas, working on multipronged campaigns to preserve and protect our environment. We think the individual battles to protect a specific stand of forest, stretch of river or indigenous wild species are the most effective in raising more complicated issues—particularly those of biodiversity and ecosystem protection—in the public mind. We help local groups working to protect local habitats and frontline communities through bold, original actions. We look for innovative groups that produce measurable results, and we like to support efforts that force the government to abide by its own—our own—laws.

    Because Patagonia is a privately held company, we have the freedom to fund groups off the beaten track, and that's where we believe our small grants are most effective.

    Deadlines

    CU Expression of Interest Deadline: 11:59pm MST February 26, 2018

    Patagonia’s Application Deadline: April 30, 2018

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    All organizations are eligible to apply for a Patagonia grant once in a 12-month period. 

    Award Information and Duration

    Grants range between $5,000 and $20,000 and can be awarded in one of the following categories:

    • Corporate Grants: work that is national scope or is not located near a U.S. retail store
    • Retail Grants: work that takes place near a Patagonia Retail store
    • International Grants: work that takes place outside of the U.S. in an approved country
    • Media Grants: uses media (mostly film) as a tool linked to direct-action campaigns
    • Native Fish Grants: efforts to restore and protect wild fish species within native range

    NIH ESTEEMED Solicitation

    Program Summary

    The NIH Research Education Program (R25) supports research educational activities that complement other formal training programs in the mission areas of the NIH Institutes and Centers. The over-arching goals of the NIH R25 program are to: (1) complement and/or enhance the training of a workforce to meet the nation’s biomedical, behavioral and clinical research needs; (2) enhance the diversity of the biomedical, behavioral and clinical research workforce; (3) help recruit individuals with specific specialty or disciplinary backgrounds to research careers in biomedical, behavioral and clinical sciences; and (4) foster a better understanding of biomedical, behavioral and clinical research and its implications.

    To accomplish the stated over-arching goal, this FOA will support creative educational activities with a primary focus on:

    • Research Experiencesfor undergraduate students to provide preparation for and hands-on exposure to research. At a minimum, this preparation should include a summer bridge program, summer research experience, and additional activities during the academic year, including, but not limited to seminars and/or workshops that enhance skills in the basic sciences, computation, and scientific communication as well as introduce students to the laboratory environment  
    • Mentoring Activitiesdedicated to providing not only technical expertise, but advice, individual coaching, professional development, and career guidance to the participants. Mentoring should occur at multiple levels ideally involving faculty, peers, alumni, and family. For institutions with graduate degree programs, Ph.D. candidates may also participate as mentors.

    Deadlines
    CU Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: 11:59pm MST February 28, 2018

    NIH Letter of Intent Deadline: April 24, 2018

    NIH Full Proposal Deadline: 5:00pm MST May 24, 2018

    Eligibility

    There are no eligibility requirements.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Only one application per institution is identified.

    Award Information and Duration

    The maximum project period is 5 years.

    https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17579/nsf17579.htm

    ***When submitting your expression of interest, please specify under which of the project types (Alliances; Louis Stokes Regional Centers of Excellence in Broadening Participation; Pre-Alliance Planning) you are interested in applying.***

    The Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation (LSAMP) program is an alliance-based program. The program's theory is based on the Tinto model for student retention1. The overall goal of the program is to assist universities and colleges in diversifying the nation's science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workforce by increasing the number of STEM baccalaureate and graduate degrees awarded to populations historically underrepresented in these disciplines: African Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, and Native Pacific Islanders.

    The LSAMP program takes a comprehensive approach to student development and retention. Particular emphasis is placed on transforming undergraduate STEM education through innovative, evidence-based recruitment and retention strategies, and relevant educational experiences in support of racial and ethnic groups historically underrepresented in STEM disciplines.

    The LSAMP program also supports knowledge generation, knowledge utilization, program impact and dissemination type activities. The program seeks new learning and immediate diffusion of scholarly research into the field. Under this program, funding for STEM educational and broadening participation research activities could include research to develop new models in STEM engagement, recruitment and retention practices for all critical pathways to STEM careers or research on interventions such as mentoring, successful learning practices and environments, STEM efficacy studies, and technology use.

    Overall, the LSAMP program provides funding to alliances that implement comprehensive, evidence-based, innovative, and sustained strategies that ultimately result in the graduation of well-prepared, highly-qualified students from underrepresented minority groups who pursue graduate studies or careers in STEM.

    Project types under this program include:

    1. Alliances. Alliances are consortia of multiple degree-granting institutions. Organizations from other sectors, including informal science organizations, may be participants. Projects focus on pre-college and undergraduate recruitment and retention activities. Types of LSAMP alliances are described as follows:

    A. STEM Pathways Implementation-Only Alliance projects are mainly focused on a particular STEM pathway, e.g., entry into college, first two years, or preparation for entry into graduate studies. Additionally, the project may focus on activities dedicated to diversifying a particular STEM discipline, e.g., production of mathematicians. These projects are targeted to newly-created alliances, reconstituted alliances or alliances that have received support by the program for less than 10 years. Projects are five years in duration.

    B. STEM Pathways and Research Alliances are projects that focus on the full STEM pathway and provide direct support for undergraduate students but also serve as a hub for the production of scholarly STEM research and evaluation to increase the knowledge-base and utilization in broadening participation. Both components must be addressed to be competitive for this project type. These are five-year projects.

    C. Bridge to the Baccalaureate (B2B) Alliances involve associate degree producing institutions for which the lead institution must be a community college. These are three-year projects focused on activities that provide effective educational preparation of community college students from underrepresented minority populations for successful transfer to four-year institutions in STEM degree programs.

    1. Louis Stokes Regional Centers of Excellence in Broadening Participation (LSRCE). These centers can serve as regional outreach and knowledge-diffusion centers of excellence for alliance and non-alliance organizations. LSRCE's are projects that have wide latitude for design with a focus on technical assistance in the broadening participation arena, for example, and are focused on increasing the knowledge base on broadening participation topics through research, evaluation and synthesis activities. Centers do not provide direct degree production interventions or student support activities. The projects may be three or five years in duration depending on the scope of activities.
    2. Pre-Alliance Planning: Pre-Alliance planning projects undertake planning activities necessary to form new alliances. Recipients of pre-alliance planning grants must commit to submission of an alliance or center proposal following the planning period. Projects are up to 18 months in duration.
    3. Conferences and other supplemental funding opportunities are supported for existing LSAMP alliances or LSAMP institutions. Examples include the NSF-Department of Energy collaboration to provide cutting-edge research experiences to students and faculty participants. These opportunities also may be announced under Dear Colleague Letters. Conference proposals may be submitted under NSF's general proposal guidelines as unsolicited proposals.

    Deadlines

    Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: N/A; email ltdsubs@colorado.edu if interested

    NSF New and Renewal LSAMP Pre-Alliance Planning, Bridge to the Baccalaureate (B2B), STEM Pathways Implementation-Only Projects Deadline: 5:00pm MST November 17, 2017

    NSF STEM Pathways and Research Alliances Deadline: 5:00pm MST January 26, 2018

    NSF Louis Stokes Regional Centers of Excellence in Broadening Participation Deadline: 5:00pm MST January 26, 2018

    Eligibility

    Proposals may only be submitted by the following:

    • The following may submit as lead and partner organization for all project types:
      • Universities and Colleges - Universities and two- and four-year colleges (including community colleges) accredited in, and having a campus located in, the US acting on behalf of their faculty members. Such organizations also are referred to as academic institutions.
    • The following may submit as lead or collaborating organization for the Lewis Stokes Regional Centers of Excellence in Broadening Participation project type:
      • Universities and Colleges - Universities and two- and four-year colleges (including community colleges) accredited in, and having a campus located in, the US acting on behalf of their faculty members. Such organizations also are referred to as academic institutions.
      • Non-profit, non-academic organizations: Independent museums, observatories, research labs, professional societies and similar organizations in the U.S. associated with educational or research activities.
      • For-profit organizations: U.S. commercial organizations, especially small businesses with strong capabilities in scientific or engineering research or education.

    The Principal Investigator (PI) for Alliances (including Bridge to the Baccalaureate) should be the President, Chancellor, or Provost of the lead institution and member of the alliance governing board. A full justification is needed for a PI designation at variance with this requirement. Co-principal investigators (Co-PIs) from partner institutions may be designated for the project.

    For STEM Pathways and Research Alliances one or more of the Co-PIs must be a social or data scientist, disciplinary/interdisciplinary education researcher or evaluator.

    The Principal Investigator for Louis Stokes Regional Center of Excellence in Broadening Participation proposals must be a senior organizational administrator. Project managers and STEM faculty members may be among the PI/Co-PI team. The PI/Co-PI team must also include a social or data scientist, disciplinary/interdisciplinary education researcher or evaluator.

    The Principal Investigator for Pre-Alliance Planning proposals should be the key personnel that will be responsible for organizing and implementing the planning activities. Institutional leadership support must be demonstrated by the participating institutions.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Alliances: Only one proposal may be submitted by an eligible (lead) institution. Alliances may hold only one active alliance award at a time. Institutions partnering in an alliance may not be a formal partner in more than one alliance at the same time. This eligibility applies to proposals for STEM Pathways Implementation-Only AlliancesBridge to the Baccalaureate Alliances, and Louis Stokes STEM Pathways and Research Alliances.

    Louis Stokes Regional Centers of Excellence in Broadening Participation (LSRCE): One proposal may be submitted by eligible lead institutions/organizations annually. Organizations may have only one active center award. All active alliances are eligible to submit LSRCE proposals as lead organizations.

    Pre-Alliance Planning: Only one proposal may be submitted by an eligible institution.

    Limit on Number of Proposals per PI or Co-PI:

    Alliances: New, existing and pre-alliance planning: 1

    Louis Stokes Regional Centers of Excellence in Broadening Participation: No limit

    Award Information and Duration

    Estimated Number of Awards: 25 to 40

    Up to 40 new awards from all funding tracks annually. Award sizes and durations vary for the different LSAMP award types.

    Anticipated Funding Amount: $22,300,000

    Annually for new awards from all LSAMP funding opportunities.

    Approximately $22.3 million annually, pending availability of funds, for new awards to support LSAMP funding opportunities in this solicitation.

    https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-17-051.html

    The NIH Research Education Program (R25) supports research educational activities that complement other formal training programs in the mission areas of the NIH Institutes and Centers. The over-arching goals of the NIH R25 program are to: (1) complement and/or enhance the training of a workforce to meet the nation’s biomedical, behavioral and clinical research needs; (2) enhance the diversity of the biomedical, behavioral and clinical research workforce; (3) help recruit individuals with specific specialty or disciplinary backgrounds to research careers in biomedical, behavioral and clinical sciences; and (4) foster a better understanding of biomedical, behavioral and clinical research and its implications.

    The over-arching goal of this NIGMS R25 program is to support educational activities that enhance the diversity of the biomedical research workforce.   Applications are encouraged from research-intensive institutions that propose to develop recent baccalaureate science graduates from underrepresented backgrounds so that they have the necessary knowledge and skills to pursue Ph.D. degrees in biomedical sciences. To accomplish the stated over-arching goal, this FOA will support creative educational activities with a primary focus on:

    • Research Experiences: For example, for postbaccalaureates: to provide hands-on exposure to research, to prepare them for graduate school admissions, successful completion of the Ph.D., and careers in research.  
    • Courses for Skills Development: For example, for postbaccalaureates: to provide advanced courses in a specific discipline or research area, courses or workshops to develop scholarly potential, and/or specialized research techniques, to prepare them for graduate school admissions, successful completion of the Ph.D., and careers in research.

    Deadlines

    Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: N/A; email ltdsubs@colorado.edu if interested

    NIH Deadline: 5:00pm MST January 24, 2018

    Eligibility

    Any individual(s) with the skills, knowledge, and resources necessary to carry out the proposed research as the Program Director(s)/Principal Investigator(s) (PD(s)/PI(s)) is invited to work with his/her organization to develop an application for support. Individuals from diverse backgrounds, including underrepresented racial and ethnic groups, individuals with disabilities, and women are always encouraged to apply for NIH support.

    For institutions/organizations proposing multiple PDs/PIs, visit the Multiple Program Director/Principal Investigator Policy and submission details in the Senior/Key Person Profile (Expanded) Component of the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide.

    The PD/PI should be an established investigator in the scientific area in which the application is targeted and capable of providing both administrative and scientific leadership to the development and implementation of the proposed program. The PD/PI will be expected to monitor and assess the program and submit all documents and reports as required.

    The PD(s)/PI(s) must have a regular full-time appointment (i.e., not adjunct, part-time, retired, or emeritus) at the applicant institution. The PD(s)/PI(s) is responsible for ensuring that the PREP participants are placed in highly productive laboratories with faculty mentors who will provide the proper guidance and instruction for the participants. In consultation with the advisory committee, if one is included, the PD(s)/PI(s) should oversee the preparation and development of an IDP for each participant, as well as design program activities that will further enhance the academic preparation and research skills of the participants. The PD(s)/PI(s) should ensure that other institutional programs will complement the PREP activities, and allow sufficient occasion for the participants to interact with Ph.D. candidates as peers.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Only one application per institution is allowed.

    Award Information and Duration

    The number of awards is contingent upon NIH appropriations and the submission of a sufficient number of meritorious applications. The total direct costs for each award are limited to $400,000 annually. The total project period may not exceed 5 years.

    https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-17-053.html

    The NIH Research Education Program (R25) supports research educational activities that complement other formal training programs in the mission areas of the NIH Institutes and Centers. The over-arching goals of the NIH R25 program are to: (1) complement and/or enhance the training of a workforce to meet the nation's biomedical, behavioral and clinical research needs; (2) enhance the diversity of the biomedical, behavioral and clinical research workforce; (3) help recruit individuals with specific specialty or disciplinary backgrounds to research careers in biomedical, behavioral and clinical sciences; and (4) foster a better understanding of biomedical, behavioral and clinical research and its implications.

    The over-arching goal of this NIGMS R25 program is to support educational activities that enhance the diversity of the biomedical research workforce.  To accomplish the stated over-arching goal, this FOA will support creative educational activities with a primary focus on:

    • Courses for Skills Development: For example, advanced courses in a specific discipline or research area, clinical procedures for research, or specialized research techniques.  
    • Research Experiences: For example, for undergraduate students: to provide hands-on exposure to research, to reinforce their intent to graduate with a cutting-edge science degree, and/or to prepare them for graduate school admissions and/or careers in research; for graduate students: to provide cutting-edge modern research experiences and related training and mentoring not available through formal NIH training mechanisms.  An integral part of the program will be to engage in unique, targeted recruitment of individuals from currently underrepresented groups in the biomedical sciences research enterprise to ensure a diverse student cohort.  

    Deadlines

    Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: N/A; email ltdsubs@colorado.edu if interested

    NIH Deadline: 5:00pm MST January 26, 2018

    Eligibility

    All PD(s)/PI(s) must have an eRA Commons account.  PD(s)/PI(s) should work with their organizational officials to either create a new account or to affiliate their existing account with the applicant organization in eRA Commons. If the PD/PI is also the organizational Signing Official, they must have two distinct eRA Commons accounts, one for each role. Obtaining an eRA Commons account can take up to 2 weeks.

    Any individual(s) with the skills, knowledge, and resources necessary to carry out the proposed research as the Program Director(s)/Principal Investigator(s) (PD(s)/PI(s)) is invited to work with his/her organization to develop an application for support. Individuals from diverse backgrounds, including underrepresented racial and ethnic groups, individuals with disabilities, and women are always encouraged to apply for NIH support.

    For institutions/organizations proposing multiple PDs/PIs, visit the Multiple Program Director/Principal Investigator Policy and submission details in the Senior/Key Person Profile (Expanded) Component of the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide.

    The PD/PI should be an established investigator in the scientific area in which the application is targeted and capable of providing both administrative and scientific leadership to the development and implementation of the proposed program. The PD/PI will be expected to monitor and assess the program and submit all documents and reports as required.

    The PD(s)/PI(s) must have a regular full-time appointment (i.e., not adjunct, part-time, retired, or emeritus) at the applicant institution.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Only one application per institution (normally identified by having a unique DUNS number or NIH IPF number) is allowed for the IMSD Program. The NIH will not accept duplicate or highly overlapping applications under review at the same time. This means that the NIH will not accept:

    • A new (A0) application that is submitted before issuance of the summary statement from the review of an overlapping new (A0) or resubmission (A1) application.
    • A resubmission (A1) application that is submitted before issuance of the summary statement from the review of the previous new (A0) application.
    • An application that has substantial overlap with another application pending appeal of initial peer review (see NOT-OD-11-101).

    Award Information and Duration

    The total amount to be awarded is approximately $5 million (total costs) per year. Awards issued under this FOA are contingent upon the availability of funds and the submission of a sufficient number of meritorious applications. Because the nature and scope of the proposed research education program will vary from application to application, it is anticipated that the size and duration of each award will also vary. The total amount awarded and the number of awards will depend upon the quality, duration and costs of the applications received.

    Although the size of award may vary with the scope of the research education program proposed and there are no specific budget limitations, the requested direct costs must be reasonable, well documented, fully justified and commensurate with the scope of the proposed program. All awards are subject to the availability of funds. The total project period for an application submitted in response to this funding opportunity may not exceed 5 years. 

    https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-ES-15-020.html

    Program Summary 

    ***When submitting your expression of interest, be sure to specify under which School or College you will be applying.***

    The Outstanding New Environmental Scientist (ONES) Award is intended to identify the most talented Early Stage Investigators (ESIs) who intend to make a long-term commitment to research in the Environmental Health Sciences and assist them in launching an innovative research program focused on the understanding of environmental exposure effects on people’s health.

    Deadlines

    Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: N/A; email ltdsubs@colorado.edu if interested

    NIH Letter of Intent Deadline: 5:00pm MST January 27, 2018

    NIH Application Deadline: 5:00pm MST February 27, 2018

    Eligibility

    Program Directors/Principal Investigators (PD(s)/PI(s))

    All PD(s)/PI(s) must have an eRA Commons account.  PD(s)/PI(s) should work with their organizational officials to either create a new account or to affiliate their existing account with the applicant organization in eRA Commons. If the PD/PI is also the organizational Signing Official, they must have two distinct eRA Commons accounts, one for each role. Obtaining an eRA Commons account can take up to 2 weeks.

    Eligible Individuals (Program Director/Principal Investigator)

    Any individual(s) with the skills, knowledge, and resources necessary to carry out the proposed research as the Program Director(s)/Principal Investigator(s) (PD(s)/PI(s)) is invited to work with his/her organization to develop an application for support. Individuals from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups as well as individuals with disabilities are always encouraged to apply for NIH support.

    For institutions/organizations proposing multiple PDs/PIs, visit the Multiple Program Director/Principal Investigator Policy and submission details in the Senior/Key Person Profile (Expanded) Component of the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide.

    To be eligible for this award, applicants must have a Ph.D., M.D., or equivalent graduate degree.  PD(s)/PI(s) must be NIH defined Early Stage Investigators. See https://grants.nih.gov/grants/new_investigators/index.htm

    In addition, PD/PIs must have faculty appointments which are tenure track or equivalent, generally at the level of Assistant Professor, or Research Assistant Professor, and have demonstrated outstanding abilities in basic, clinical or population-based research. Individuals must have established research independence from a mentor, and have dedicated, independent laboratory space or access to the clinical, population-based and/or public health research resources which will allow them to conduct the research proposed in the grant application as the lead, independent PD/PI.

    Applicants must have research focus and a long-term commitment to a career in environmental health research consistent with the core mission areas of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The NIEHS will decline applications not considered central to either the mission or the research priorities of the NIEHS as part of the initial evaluation for responsiveness.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Only one application per School or College within a University will be accepted.

    Award Information and Duration

    NIEHS intends to commit $3.0 million per year in fiscal years 2017, 2018, and 2019 to fund 5-6 awards each year.

    For most applications, the budget for direct costs should be limited to $250,000 per year, plus the portion of the additional $250,000 budget for career enhancement which will be distributed over a 5-year award period.  Note: the $250,000 career enhancement budget will be distributed over a 5-year period but does not have to be distributed evenly across each year. With strong justification, research projects which have inherently higher costs may request direct costs of up to $400,000 per year, plus career enhancement.  In no year may the total direct cost budget (research plus career enhancement) exceed $475,000 per year.

    The scope of the proposed project should determine the project period.  The maximum project period is 5 years.

    http://www.luiprize.org/en/nomination/the-lui-che-woo-prize-2018

    ***Please note that self-nominations are not allowed. Nominations must be submitted by someone other than the nominee. When submitting an expression of interest, please specify under which prize category you are interested in nominating.***

    Unlike other international prizes which have specific fields, the LUI Che Woo Prize is a new and prestigious international accolade awarded to individuals or organizations who have displayed remarkable achievements towards the three objectives of the Prize thereby contributing to world civilization. Thus, the coverage of the LUI Che Woo Prize is very broad, the recipients not being limited to academics and scientists. The LUI Che Woo Prize recognizes accomplishments beneficial to mankind and also encourages the continuation of that work for which its laureates have been chosen. It transcends all boundaries of nations, it promotes universal values and it sows seeds for the continuous development of a better and harmonious world.

    The LUI Che Woo Prize aims to recognize and honor individuals or organizations all over the world with outstanding achievements and contributions in respect of the following three objectives:

    • Prize Category 1: Sustainable development of the world
      • This objective is to recognize an outstanding achievement of an individual or an organization in maintaining a sustainable ecological balance and natural capital on the one hand and providing for the needs of future generations on the other.
    • Prize Category 2: Betterment of the welfare of mankind
      • This objective is to acknowledge an outstanding effort of an individual or an organization to enhance the well-being of the human race.
    • Prize Category 3: Promotion of positive life attitude and enhancement of positive energy
      • This objective is to honor a model which can be an individual or an organization of unwavering determination demonstrated in the adoption of a positive attitude and making constructive changes in the face of setbacks, hardship and adversity.

    Deadlines

    Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: N/A; email ltdsubs@colorado.edu if interested

    LUI Che Woo Prize Deadline: January 31, 2018

    Eligibility

    Individual nominees must be living on the date of their nomination. If an individual dies before he/she has received the LUI Che Woo Prize, then the LUI Che Woo Prize may be presented to posthumously to his/her estate.

    Each nomination will be considered, and each Prize will be awarded, regardless of an individual’s age, gender, race, sexual orientation, disability, nationality, religion or belief or, in the case of an organization, its place of establishment.

    Directors and officers of the Prize Company, members of its Prize Council, Prize Recommendation Committee and Selection Panels are not eligible to receive the LUI Che Woo Prize.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    There is a limit of one nomination for each of the three prizes, up to a maximum total of three nominations.

    Prize Information

    Each awardee will receive a cash award of HK$20 million (equivalent to approximately US$2.56 million), a certificate and a trophy.

    I-Corps Nodes Program

    Program Summary

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) seeks to further develop and nurture a national innovation ecosystem that builds upon fundamental research to guide the output of scientific discoveries closer to the development of technologies, products, processes and services that benefit society. The goal of the program is to dramatically reduce the period of time necessary to bring a promising idea from its inception to widespread implementation.

    Through this solicitation, NSF is seeking to expand and sustain the network of Innovation Corps (I-CorpsTM) (hereinafter I-Corps) Nodes that work cooperatively to support the development of innovations that will benefit society. NSF plans to build upon the established National Innovation Network (consisting of I-Corps Nodes and Sites) to further support the needs for innovation research, education and training. The interconnected nodes of the network are expected to be diverse in research areas, resources, tools, programs, capabilities, and geographic locations - providing the network with the flexibility to grow or reconfigure as needs arise.

    I-Corps Nodes will foster understanding on how to: 1) identify, develop and support promising ideas that can generate value, 2) create and implement tools, resources and training activities that enhance our nation's innovation capacity, 3) gather, analyze, evaluate and utilize the data and insight resulting from the experiences of those participating in regional programs and 4) share and leverage effective innovation practices on a national scale - to improve the quality of life for the U.S. citizenry. In addition, Nodes must identify and are expected to implement plans for sustainable scaling of their efforts beyond the duration of NSF support.

    Deadlines

    Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: N/A

    NSF Letter of Intent Deadline: February 8, 2018 5:00PM MST

    NSF Full Proposal Deadline: March 13, 2018 5:00PM MST

    Eligibility

    The PI must be an academic Administrative Lead at the level of Dean or higher, preferably at the level of a provost or vice-president.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Organizations may only be a participant in one proposal per deadline. In addition, organizations may only be associated with one I-Corps Node that is receiving funding from NSF at a given time.

    Award Information and Duration

    Track 1: I-Corps Node Development - new I-Corps Node awardees - to be supported at a level of up to:

    $1,200,000 (years 1 and 2)

    $900,000 (year 3)

    $600,000 (year 4)

    $300,000 (year 5)

    Track 2: I-Corps Node Renewal - previously funded I-Corps Nodes - to be supported at a level of up to:

    $900,000 (years 1 and 2)

    $750,000 (year 3)

    $600,000 (year 4)

    $300,000 (year 5)

    I-Corps Sites Program

    Program Summary

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) seeks to develop and nurture a national innovation ecosystem that builds upon research to guide the output of scientific discoveries closer to the development of technologies, products and processes that benefit society.

    In order to contribute to a national innovation ecosystem, NSF established the NSF Innovation Corps Sites Program (NSF I-Corps Sites). Sites are funded at academic institutions, having already existing innovation or entrepreneurial units, to enable them to:

    • Nurture students and/or faculty who are engaged in projects having the potential to be transitioned into the marketplace. I-Corps Sites will provide infrastructure, advice, resources, networking opportunities, training and modest funding to enable groups to transition their work into the marketplace or into becoming I-Corps Team applicants.
    • Develop formal, active, local innovation ecosystems that contribute to a larger, national network of mentors, researchers, entrepreneurs and investors. Networking is an essential component of all of NSF’s I-Corps activities – local and national networking activities help advance the goals of I-Corps and contribute to local and national ecosystems for innovation.

    The purpose of an I-Corps Site is to nurture and support multiple, local teams to transition their ideas, devices, processes or other intellectual activities into the marketplace.

    Deadlines

    Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: N/A

    NSF Full Proposal Deadline: February 8, 2018 5:00PM MST

    Eligibility

    There are no restrictions or limits.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Limit on Number of Proposals per Organization: 1

    Limit on Number of Proposals per PI or Co-PI: 1

    Award Information and Duration

    There are two types of I-Corps Site proposals:

    Type I - Type I proposals are submitted by institutions that have not had prior funding as an I-Corps Site. These proposals may request $100,000 per year for up to five years.

    Type II - Type II proposals are submitted by institutions that have had prior funding as an I-Corps Site. These proposals may request up to $100,000 per year for up to three years.

    https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/nsf15528/nsf15528.htm

    Cultivating Cultures for Ethical STEM (CCE STEM) funds research projects that identify factors that are efficacious in the formation of ethical STEM researchers in all the fields of science and engineering that NSF supports. CCE STEM solicits proposals for research that explores the following: ‘What constitutes ethical STEM research and practice, and which cultural and institutional contexts promote ethical STEM research and practice and why?' Factors one might consider include: honor codes, professional ethics codes and licensing requirements, an ethic of service and/or service learning, life-long learning requirements, curricula or memberships in organizations (e.g. Engineers without Borders) that stress social responsibility and humanitarian goals, institutions that serve under-represented groups, institutions where academic and research integrity are cultivated at multiple levels, institutions that cultivate ethics across the curriculum, or programs that promote group work, or do not grade. Do certain labs have a ‘culture of academic integrity'? What practices contribute to the establishment and maintenance of ethical cultures and how can these practices be transferred, extended to, and integrated into other research and learning settings?

    Successful proposals typically have a comparative dimension, either between or within institutional settings that differ along these or other factors.

    CCE STEM research projects will use basic research to produce knowledge about what constitutes responsible or irresponsible, just or unjust scientific practices and sociotechnical systems, and how to best instill students with this knowledge.

    Proposals for awards from minority-serving institutions (e.g. Tribal Colleges and Universities, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Hispanic-Serving Institutions, Alaska Native or Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions), women's colleges, and institutions primarily serving persons with disabilities are strongly encouraged. Proposals including international collaborations are encouraged when those efforts enhance the merit of the proposed work by incorporating unique resources, expertise, facilities or sites of international partners. The U.S. team's international counterparts generally should have support or obtain funding through other sources.

    Deadlines

    Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: N/A; email ltdsubs@colorado.edu if interested

    NSF Deadline: 5:00pm MST February 15, 2018

    Eligibility

    Proposals may only be submitted by the following:

    • Universities and Colleges - Universities and two- and four-year colleges (including community colleges) accredited in, and having a campus located in, the US acting on behalf of their faculty members. Such organizations also are referred to as academic institutions.
    • Non-profit, non-academic organizations: Independent museums, observatories, research labs, professional societies and similar organizations in the U.S. associated with educational or research activities.

    Who May Serve as PI:

    NSF expects project teams to include persons with appropriate expertise. This might include expertise in the domain or domains of science or engineering on which the project focuses, in ethics, values, evaluation, and pedagogy. For Institutional Transformation Research Grant proposals, it is highly recommended that one or more senior members of the administration (e.g. Provost, VP, and/or President) serves as a PI.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Only one proposal may be submitted by an eligible organization, as defined above, in which a member of their organization serves as the PI. Potential PIs are advised to contact their institutional office of research regarding processes used to select proposals for submission. Organizations submitting more than one proposal will be notified and given one week from notification to select one proposal for consideration. If one is not selected in that time period, all of those proposals will be returned without review. There is no limit on the number of proposals under which an organization may be included as a non-lead collaborator or sub-awardee.

    There are no restrictions or limits on the number of proposals per PI or co-PI.

    Award Information and Duration

    Estimated Number of Awards: 6 to 8

    Anticipated Funding Amount: $3,150,000

    Estimated total annual funding amount is $3,150,000 - subject to the availability of funds. The maximum amount for 5-year awards is $600,000 and the maximum amount for 3-year awards is $400,000. The average award is $275,000.

    https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-17-159.html

    Program Summary

    The National Library of Medicine seeks applications for novel data science/informatics approaches that can help individuals gather, manage and use data and information about their personal health.

    Increasingly, consumers and patients have access to a broad and complex array of personal health information that is relevant to the state of their health. Health-related information can come from diverse sources, such as mass media and social networks, health care organizations, government agencies, clinicians, family members and friends. Health-related information also comes in many different formats, such as data from an individual’s electronic medical record, family histories and genealogies, data streams from activity trackers, personal genome sequences, articles, videos about diseases and treatments, and public research data sets. It is well known that, while patients discuss personal health decisions and health information with the clinicians from whom they receive care, they also seek health information from other sources that are increasingly digital, and are constantly changing, enriched with new streams of data and new types of data. National biomedical research initiatives are emerging, such as the Precision Medicine Initiative Cohort Program (“All of Us SM” https://www.nih.gov/research-training/allofus-research-program) and the Million Veteran Program (http://www.research.va.gov/MVP/ ), that invite citizens to share personal digital health data and biospecimens with researchers. There are also collaborative initiatives such as Patients Like Me © (https://www.patientslikeme.com/) wherein patients contribute personal health data for citizen science projects.

    Whether a person wants to participate in one of these research initiatives, or just play an active role in staying healthy, she/he faces a challenge in deciding what personal health information is important enough to collect, store, manage and share. A patient with a chronic condition might want an easy way to monitor his/her progress between visits to a clinic. A parent caring for a family member with a debilitating condition might want to stay current about treatment options and clinical trials in that area. Either might be faced with test results or treatment options that they don’t understand. Someone who participated in a clinical trial might want to annotate records of his/her own results, to look for patterns. These examples are meant to highlight the scope and scale of the health information-related activities that an individual might wish to undertake. The individual must decide what kinds of data and information should be kept, and bring them together such that the combination serves as a trustworthy, usable, useful library of personal health information.

    Vast stores of digital data about health and disease, genetics, environment and behavior are the basis of keen scientific interest about what new insights into health and disease can be gained by combining and 'mining' these datasets together. The phrase 'big data' is often used to characterize this rich, multi-dimensional, heterogenous research resource. Much of the early research in big data methods and approaches for health has centered on needs of researchers in biomedical, behavioral and social science fields. For example, research supported by the National Institutes of Health through its Big Data to Knowledge Initiative (BD2K) is developing novel methods to find and visualize trends in very large data sets, using computational intelligence to integrate data from disparate sources, matching genetic defects to health manifestations, designing tools that protect privacy while using person-level data, and developing techniques to bring together all of the health information about a single patient, to name just a few areas (https://datascience.nih.gov/bd2k/funded-programs). Many of the use cases for these approaches mirror information problems an individual faces when trying to gather all of her health information from all possible sources and use it for improving and maintaining her health.

    To bring the benefits of big data research to consumers and patients, new biomedical informatics and data science approaches are needed, shaped to meet the needs of consumers and patients, whose health literacy, language skills, technical sophistication, education and cultural traditions affect how they find, understand and use personal health information.  Novel data science approaches are needed to help individuals at every step, from harvesting to storing to using data and information in a personal health library. Areas of development suggested below are not meant to limit the scope or creativity of proposed projects.

    • Constructing a personal health library: informatics approaches that help a person gather together different types of health data/information/knowledge into a single, searchable resource for personal use, including intelligent mapping tools for vocabulary used to describe elements of the library.
    • Managing a personal health information library: novel informatics approaches that make it easy for an average user to expand or remove entries, make notes or corrections, including intelligent tools that alert the user to new information about topics covered in a personal health information library.
    • Using a personal health library: data science and informatics approaches that make it easy to find and use the information stored there, including visual tagging, text summarization, graphics translation, knowledge mapping, suggestions for tutorials, analytic and visualization techniques that make the information understandable based on characteristics of the individual user or group.
    • Digital librarian/assistant for personal health library: data science and informatics approaches that bring machine intelligence to the management and use of a personal health information library through personalized alerts and suggestions, literacy aids, translators or other approaches, taking into account characteristics of the individual user or group.

    Applicants must base their proposed work on an informed profile of the intended users, and, the work should be developed through interaction with the user. The strongest projects will provide approaches that incorporate health data and information from more than one source, such as diagnostic images and links to full-text articles or genome sequence data linked to a family health history. An application should be centered on the problem area being addressed and the intended audience, propose a possible solution that employs novel data science or informatics, and undertake a pilot that will result in evidence of the degree of success and/or needed next steps. Applicants should expect to involve the intended users in their work.

    Applicants may propose new tools or extensions to the capabilities of existing open source tools such as personal health record systems, by adding new features or extending capabilities of the tool. In either case, scientific innovation is key. Applicants are encouraged to take advantage of freely available public information resources available from NLM and others, such as MedLINEPlusGenetics Home ReferencePUBMED Central, Online courses and tutorials.

    Applicants should plan to undertake one or more pilots to test their ideas with the intended user group. If pilots focus on a single disease or health condition, applicants should provide assurance that their approach is generalizable to others. Awardees are expected to share the results of their work through publication, and through open source mechanisms for data or resource sharing. The plan for data/resource sharing will be discussed during the initial scientific merit review.

    Projects that propose the following outcomes would not be appropriate for this FOA:

    • A tool that requires the user to purchase a commercial off-the-shelf product.
    • An information resource that requires payment for access to information.
    • A tool that supports management of only a single kind of health data or information.
    • An approach that does not allow the user to expand or update the contents.
    • An approach that doesn't allow the user to update, annotate or add/delete data.
    • An approach that limits the user's ability to share information from her/his personal health library with another person or organization.

    Potential applicants are urged to discuss their proposed project with the Research Contact listed in Section VII Agency Contacts, for advice about the suitability of their idea for this funding initiative. 

    Deadlines

    CU Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: N/A; email ltdsubs@colorado.edu if interested

    NIH Letter of Intent Deadline (Optional): February 16, 2018

    NIH Application Deadline: 5:00pm MST March 19, 2018

    Eligibility

    Any individual(s) with the skills, knowledge, and resources necessary to carry out the proposed research as the Program Director(s)/Principal Investigator(s) (PD(s)/PI(s)) is invited to work with his/her organization to develop an application for support. Individuals from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups as well as individuals with disabilities are always encouraged to apply for NIH support.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Only one application per institution (normally identified by having a unique DUNS number or NIH IPF number) is allowed.

    Award Information and Duration

    Up to $250,000 per year for up to 4 years.

    https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2018/nsf18519/nsf18519.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT...

    Program Summary

    The Political Science Program in the Directorate for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences invites investigators who possess the theoretical, methodological, measurement, and managerial skills, as well as the institutional resources, to submit proposals to conduct the American National Elections Study (ANES) in one of two modes, face-to-face or web. The ANES is a personal interview survey, national in scope, that collects data on voting, public opinion, and political participation. The basic ANES design is a repeated, cross-sectional survey of a nationally representative sample of adults. The ANES interview conducts two 75 minute interviews with each respondent. One interview occurs prior to the presidential election while the other occurs after the election. Part of that time is devoted to core items and the remainder is devoted to new or relatively new items. The “core” consists of questions that regularly appear on the ANES, allowing for long-term comparisons. Traditionally, the ANES has been conducted using a face-to-face mode. In the last two cycles, the survey has been supplemented with a web mode. The participants in the web mode were separate from those of the face-to-face mode and were selected using random sampling.

    Content of the surveys come from a variety of sources. As mentioned above, some of the content comes from past surveys. While some items may stay the same, others may change over time with an eye to improving the items using the latest knowledge in survey methodology. Some items may be suggested by the principal investigators or the members of their Board of Overseers (see below). Other items may be provided by the public through the Online Commons or its equivalent. These items are vetted by the principal investigators and/or the members of the Board.

    Project oversight is provided by the ANES Board of Overseers that consists of prominent scholars with expertise in survey research, other social and behavioral methodologies, and a range of substantive areas. Board members review items, submissions from the Online Commons or its equivalent, and provide the principal investigators with advice when needed. This advice may come from discussions held in Board meetings or from technical reports or white papers written by members of the Board. The membership of the ANES Board will be selected jointly by the two awardees in coordination with the cognizant NSF program officer. The cognizant program officer has final approval of the membership of the Board and can suggest additional members as needed.

    The ANES awards will fund the following activities:

    ANES Face to Face award

    • Data collection for the ANES around the 2020 presidential election
    • Pre- and Post-election face to face interviews
    • Sample based on a random probability based sample
    • Survey instrument development for the ANES
    • Survey design, innovations, and continual enhancement of the survey and survey items
    • Participation in the Cooperative Study of Electoral Systems in the post-election survey
    • Post data collection editing, processing, and generation of constructed variables, data files and codebooks
    • Data dissemination through a cutting-edge web-based data archive
    • Support for the Board
    • Interaction with the principal investigators of the GSS and PSID
    • Interaction and coordination with the principal investigators of the ANES Web to create common content across the two modes

    ANES Web

    • Data collection for the ANES around the 2020 presidential election
    • Pre- and Post-election web interviews
    • Sample based on a random probability based sample
    • Survey instrument development for the ANES
    • Survey design, innovations, and continual enhancement of the survey and survey items
    • Develop the survey to act as a true mode comparison with the Face to Face instrument
    • Post data collection editing, processing, and generation of constructed variables, data files and codebooks
    • Data dissemination through a cutting-edge web-based data archive
    • Support for the Board
    • Interaction with the principal investigators of the GSS and PSID
    • Interaction and coordination with the principal investigators of the ANES Face to Face award to create common content across the two modes

    While the ANES Face-to-Face and the ANES Web awards will be made independently, the principal investigators will be expected to work together to develop the items and the instrument. This means the principal investigators or their proxies should be regularly interacting with each other. Also, they will share one Board of Overseers to govern both enterprises. It is expected that the principal investigators will consult in the construction of that Board and will coordinate in the calling and hosting of Board meetings. The Board will be expected to meet at least twice a year prior to the Presidential election and meet at least once post president election. To ensure the cooperation on the use of the Board and simplify the application process, the Political Science program plans to provide supplemental support for these meetings. The potential membership of the Board should not be discussed in either proposal.

    Project descriptions should address the Principal Investigator’s ability and capacity to meet the following scientific infrastructure objectives:

    • Scientific and methodological expertise and resources for survey sample and survey instrument development and innovation
    • Continued development and refinement of the ANES instrument including the core
    • Collection for the pre and post presidential election surveys
    • Maintain continuity and high quality of the ANES data set
    • Process, edit, and release raw data, generated variables, and code books in a timely manner
    • Maintain cyberinfrastructure to disseminate/share data documentation with expansions and innovations in data sharing tools as technology develops
    • Develop educational and research outreach activities illustrating the use of the data to a variety of audiences
    • Maintain sensitive data dissemination
    • Coordinate with the principal investigators of the other ANES award

    Deadlines

    Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: N/A; email ltdsubs@colorado.edu if interested

    NSF Letter of Intent Deadline: 5:00pm MST February 21, 2018

    NSF Full Proposal Target Date: 5:00pm MST April 20, 2018

    Eligibility

    If a project is being undertaken by researchers at multiple institutions, a single organization must be identified as the lead organization. A single proposal describing the entire project must be submitted by the organization with funds distributed among partner organizations via subawards from the lead organization. Direct submission of linked collaborative sets of proposals by multiple organizations is not permitted.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Institutions are restricted to submitting only one proposal for this solicitation. The one proposal can be for either the ANES Face-to-Face Competition or for the ANES WEB Competition.

    Principal Investigators and co-principal investigators are restricted to submitting only one proposal for this solicitation. The one proposal can be for either the ANES Face-to-Face Competition or for the ANES WEB Competition.

    Award Information and Duration

    The ANES Face-to-Face Award may be supported by a cooperative agreement up to $7,250,000 over the duration of the project.

    The ANES Web Award may be supported by a cooperative agreement up to $4,250,000 over the duration of the project.

    https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-ES-18-003.html

    Program Summary 

    The NIEHS Environmental Health Sciences Core Centers (EHS CC) Program is intended to bring together investigators currently funded by NIH or other Federal or non-Federal sources to enhance the effectiveness of existing research and extend the focus of research for the environmental health sciences. An EHS CC should support innovation and be on the cutting edge of science.  It is expected that research activities will cross a variety of disciplines to bring multiple perspectives and approaches to bear on significant problems. It is expected that the interdisciplinary nature of an EHS CC will have a synergistic effect that results in greater depth, breadth, quality, innovation and productivity beyond what individual scientists would be likely to attain by working independently. As intellectual hubs for environmental health research, the membership of EHS CC's is expected to be the thought leaders for the field as well as advance the goals of the NIEHS Strategic Plan (http://www.niehs.nih.gov/about/strategicplan/.)

    The overall goals for the EHS CC Program are to enhance the capabilities of existing programs in environmental health sciences, assist with building programmatic and scientific capacity, lead in the development of novel research directions, recruit and groom future leaders in the field, and pioneer efforts in community engagement. The EHS CC grant provides facilities and resources to accelerate research along the spectrum from basic mechanistic and toxicological science to population and public health and dissemination. It should create a structure and flexibility that allow center members with different expertise to come together to answer complex and/or emerging questions and capitalize on the latest scientific trends leading to improved strategies towards preventing environmentally-induced disorders. While the EHS CC grant provides support for core resources and facilities, it does not provide direct funding for research projects, although limited funds are provided for pilot projects.

    NIEHS considers community engagement and multi-directional communication as essential activities to advance the goals and relevance of an EHS CC. Therefore, the structure of the Center should facilitate multi-directional interaction with communities and EHS CC members through the required Community Engagement Core.  In addition, EHS Cores are expected to attract established and promising investigators into environmental health research and provide opportunities for career enhancement.

    To qualify for an EHS CC, the applicant institution must have a base of ongoing, independently supported, peer-reviewed research projects clearly dedicated to the study of environmental health sciences or environmental medicine, a substantial portion of which should be supported by NIEHS.  The research base must exist prior to the submission of an application and will be considered by program staff to determine eligibility.  See Section III.1 Eligible Applicants for more detailed description of EHS base support calculation.

    Deadlines

    Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: N/A; email ldtsubs@colorado.edu if interested

    NIH Letter of Intent Deadline: March 17, 2018 (Optional)

    Application Due Date: 5:00pm MST April 17, 2018

    Eligibility

    Any individual(s) with the skills, knowledge, and resources necessary to carry out the proposed research as the Program Director(s)/Principal Investigator(s) (PD(s)/PI(s)) is invited to work with his/her organization to develop an application for support. Individuals from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups as well as individuals with disabilities are always encouraged to apply for NIH support.

    For institutions/organizations proposing multiple PDs/PIs, visit the Multiple Program Director/Principal Investigator Policy and submission details in the Senior/Key Person Profile (Expanded) Component of the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Only one application per institution.

    Award Information and Duration

    The NIEHS intends to fund an estimate of 3-4 awards, corresponding to a total of $6.0M, for fiscal years 2019 and 2020.

    Application budgets are limited to $0.7M, $1.0M or $1.3M Direct Costs per year as determined by direct costs of NIH research grants that are relevant to the environmental health sciences and for which an EHS CC member is designated as the PD/PI. See the Budget instructions for the Administrative Core to determine the applicable direct cost limit for the application.

    The project period if limited to 5 years.

    Funding Restrictions

    NIH grants policies as described in the NIH Grants Policy Statement will apply to the applications submitted and awards made from this FOA.