Our Colloquia Series presents engaging research from around the world. Guest presenters cover varied topics from all aspects of Geography. This page lists abstracts from past and future colloquia.

Geography Colloquium Series

Business and Belief among Han Chinese Practitioners of Tibetan Buddhism in the People's Republic of China

April 22, 2016

Abstract: In the context of a perceived spiritual and moral crisis in Chinese society, growing numbers of Han Chinese are turning to Tibetan Buddhism for ethical guidance. This talk is based on an ethnographic study of a group of wealthy, urban Han Chinese who have become followers of Tibetan Buddhism...

Geography Colloquium Series

Tree-mendously important? Defining and quantifying relationships between people and forests

April 15, 2016

Abstract: The relationship between forests and people is of substantial interest to peoples and agencies that govern and use them, private sector actors that seek to manage and profit from them, NGOs who support and implement conservation and development projects, and researchers who study these relationships and others. The term...

Geography Colloquium Series

The contested geopolitics of US drone warfare

March 11, 2016

Abstract: This paper argues that drone warfare is transforming the security logics of U.S. geopolitics. Crucial to this argument is the idea that technologies like drones can bend, distort, and fold their surrounding environment, producing hybrid “technogeographies” that lock uneven power relations into the planet. While geopolitics may have long...

Geography Colloquium Series

Sowing New Seeds: Prisoner Reentry and Restorative Food Justice

Feb. 19, 2016

Abstract: The current system of mass incarceration entrenches inequality and segregation. Before, within, and after people enter prison, they experience a range of structural barriers and institutional biases that make it difficult to break out of the prison pipeline. This talk investigates a network of food justice and restorative justice...

Geography Colloquium Series

Changes to the Global Value of Ecosystem Services: A Market Failure?

Feb. 12, 2016

Abstract: In 1997, the global value of ecosystem services was estimated to average $33 trillion/yr in 1995 $US ($46 trillion/yr in 2007 $US). An updated estimate based on updated unit ecosystem service values and land use change estimates between 1997 and 2011 is presented. Some critiques of the 1997 paper...

Geography Colloquium Series

A Land Made From Water: Appropriation and the Evolution of Colorado's Landscape, Ditches, and Water Institutions

Feb. 5, 2016

Former water resources administrator for the city of Boulder's open space program, Robert R. Crifasi has written a deeply researched, deftly written guide that is both informative and entertaining, even for lay readers. Widely regarded as one of the area's bona fide water experts, Crifasi sat on the boards of...

Geography Colloquium Series

Global records of lake surface temperature reveal a century of warming

Jan. 22, 2016

Abstract: Recent studies have shown significant warming of inland water bodies throughout the world. To better understand the patterns, mechanisms, and ecological implications of global lake warming, an initiative known as the "Global Lake Temperature Collaboration" (GLTC) was started in 2010, with the objective of compiling and analyzing lake temperature...

Geography Colloquium Series

Facing the North Slope's future: Indigenous experts and scientists co-assess a changing environment

Dec. 11, 2015

Abstract: The climate, sea ice, and coastal regime of Alaska’s North Slope has substantially changed over the last few decades as coastal temperatures have increased and sea ice concentration in the adjacent seas has decreased. Indigenous users of sea ice and local planners increasingly must interpret and respond to change...

Geography Colloquium Series

Segmented Re/integration: Divergent Post-Deportation Trajectories in the US-El Salvador Transnation

Dec. 4, 2015

Abstract: The U.S. is in the midst of a Great Expulsion. Record rates of non-citizens are forcibly expelled from the country each year, but little is known about their post-deportation experiences. This project draws from life history narratives of 100 persons deported to El Salvador since the mid-1990s. After outlining...

Geography Colloquium Series

Too big, too hot, too soon: Testing for fire-catalyzed changes to forest resilience in a warming climate

Nov. 6, 2015

Abstract: Fire is the dominant natural disturbance that shapes many temperate and boreal forest ecosystems, but climate warming and associated increased wildfire activity have led to widespread concern that forests may be less resilient now and in the future. How big can forest fires get before forests are slow to...

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