NSF General Social Survey (GSS) Competition

Please see the full solicitation for complete information about the funding opportunity. Below is a summary assembled by the Research & Innovation Office (RIO).

Program Summary

The General Social Survey (GSS) is a nationally representative personal interview survey of the United States adult population that collects data on a wide range of topics: behavioral items such as group membership and participation; personal psychological evaluations including measures of well-being, misanthropy, and life satisfaction; attitudinal questions on such public issues as crime and punishment, race relations, gender roles, and spending priorities; and demographic characteristics of respondents and their parents.

The Sociology Program in the Directorate for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences invites investigators who possess the theoretical, methodological, measurement, and managerial skills, as well as institutional resources, to undertake a largescale survey data collection project to submit proposals to conduct the General Social Survey (GSS) and the International Social Survey Program (ISSP) United States surveys. The (GSS) is a personal interview survey that collects data on a wide range of topics: behavioral items such as group membership and voting; personal psychological evaluations, including measures of happiness, misanthropy, and life satisfaction; attitudinal questions on such public issues as abortion, crime and punishment, race relations, gender roles, and spending priorities; demographic characteristics of respondents and their parents. The basic GSS design is a repeated cross-sectional survey of a nationally representative sample of noninstitutionalized adults who speak either English or Spanish. The GSS is a 90-120-minute in-person interview, with forty-five minutes devoted to the core items, 15 minutes to questions selected as part of the ISSP, and 30 minutes allocated to topical modules. The “core” consists of questions that regularly appear on the GSS, allowing long-term comparisons. The topical modules are used to introduce new topics not previously investigated by the GSS and to cover existing topics in greater detail. The topical modules are currently supported by additional funding secured by the principal investigators (PIs) who propose them.

Beginning in 2006, the GSS core (questions that appear regularly on surveys) was translated into Spanish and administered in either English or Spanish, as preferred, beginning with the 2006 administration. This practice will need to continue in future surveys.

Innovations in the data collection process that fall within the parameters outlined in this solicitation are welcome.

Deadlines

CU Internal Deadline: 11:59pm MST April 13, 2020

Sponsor Letter of Intent Deadline: 5:00pm MST June 1, 2020

Sponsor Application Deadline: 5:00pm MST August 17, 2020

Internal Application Requirements (all in PDF format)

  • Project Summary (2-3 pages maximum): Please include the following: 1) management plan describing qualifications of senior personnel and their expected contributions to the project; and 2) the significance of the project including intellectual merit and broader impacts.
  • PI Curriculum Vitae
  • Budget Overview (1 page maximum): A basic budget outlining project costs is sufficient; detailed OCG budgets are not required.

To access the online application, visit: https://cuboulderovcr.secure-platform.com/a/solicitations/6480/home

Eligibility

There are no special eligibility requirements.

Limited Submission Guidelines

Only one application per institution is allowed. Principal Investigators and co-principal investigators are restricted to submitting only one proposal for this solicitation.

Award Information

Award Amount: $16,000,000

Expected Number of Awards: 1

Review Criteria

In addition to the standard NSF criteria of intellectual merit and broader impacts, please note the solicitation specific criteria below. These criteria apply to the scientific infrastructure objectives listed in Section II of the solicitation.

  • Possession of the scientific expertise and resources needed for survey instrument and sample development and innovation;
  • Capacity to develop and implement modules to meet the needs of the social science research community, other government agencies, and potential funders;
  • Cost-effectiveness;
  • Ability to continue collecting high-quality data from the cross-sectional sample of 2,500 new respondents while maintaining the target response rate of at least 55%;
  • Ability to process, edit, and release data, variables and codebooks within the target timeframe of 12 months after collection;
  • Ability to maintain and develop survey data infrastructure;
  • Ability to generate tutorials illustrating the use of the data;
  • Ability to maintain a sensitive data archive, user assistance, and bibliographic and award archive; and
  • Quality of oversight and management plan.