Undergraduate Internships in Linguistics

Each semester, faculty members in the Department of Linguistics may offer internships to undergraduate students in projects that they are working on. This is a great opportunity for students to work closely with a faculty member (and in some cases graduate students) and to contribute to a faculty-led research program at a Research 1 institution. Below is a list of the internships that are currently available.

Faculty members occasionally have small funds available to offer students as compensation for time spent on the project. In some cases, students may also be able to earn independent study credit, with approval from the overseeing faculty member. Please ask the faculty member who is supervising the project about these opportunities. Students are also encouraged to consult faculty members about the possibility of applying for UROP funding to support the internship.

(1) Arapaho Lexical Database:

Work with Prof. Andrew Cowell on doing labeling, data entry, planning and analysis of an on-line lexical database of the Arapaho language, to eventually become a dictionary as well. This will involve some understanding of database structure and interdependencies, database planning in relation to potential computational or curricular uses, and best practices in lexical analysis. No computational expertise needed. Work is flexible, during the semester or the summer. If interested, please contact Andy Cowell at cowellj@colorado.edu.

(2) Colorado Language Trends (http://www.colorado.edu/clasp/research-projects.html)

Work with Prof. Kira Hall and Prof. Chase Raymond on a new research survey of language trends in Colorado. We are looking for motivated and responsible students to lead data collection projects (both online and in the field) on language diversity and language change across the state—from the Front Range to the Eastern Plains, from the southern region to the Colorado Western Slope, from mountain towns to Denver suburbs, and even among University of Colorado college students. The first stages of this project will involve online bibliographic and sociohistorical work on Colorado languages, dialects, names, vocabularies, sound changes, and speech communities, with the goal of mapping out sites of linguistic interest across the state for future research. Speakers from bilingual backgrounds are needed, as are students who know a lot about specific regions of Colorado or have taken a course in sociocultural linguistics (Ling 1000, Ling 2400, Ling 3220, Ling 3545, Ling 4800). Work is flexible, during the semester or the summer. If interested, please contact Kira Hall at kira.hall@colorado.edu or Chase Raymond at chase.raymond@colorado.edu.

(3) English assessments and prosody

Work with Prof. Laura Michaelis on English assessments and prosody. This project requires some proficiency with Praat and corpus methods. You will help extract instances of an English dialog act type, the assessment pattern (illustrated by THAT's good and That’s TRUE) from the Fisher corpus of spoken English, including all sound files, placing each instance in a Praat text grid for annotation. The project concerns variation in the stress patterns of assessments, deceptively simple creatures that help us learn about general linguistic patterns, just as fruit flies help geneticists! If interested, please contact Laura Michaelis at laura.michaelis@colorado.edu.

(4) Research projects in the Language, Development, and Cognition (LDC) Lab (https://sites.google.com/a/colorado.edu/ldclab/current-projects)

Work with Prof. Bhuvana Narasimhan and her lab members on research in Linguistics and Cognitive Science. Ongoing projects investigate the development of spatial prepositions in English, word order choices in monolingual and bilingual speakers of English, Spanish, and Mandarin, and the use of grammatical agreement in adult speakers of English, among others. We are looking for 1-2 motivated, conscientious students with excellent organizational skills to collect, transcribe, or analyze data and conduct literature surveys. Native speakers of any language are welcome (note: if you are a native speaker of Hindi or Tamil, you will also have the opportunity to transcribe and conduct research on Hindi or Tamil language corpora). Work is flexible, during the semester or the summer. If interested, please contact our lab coordinator, Norielle Adricula, at our lab email address: ldclab.boulder@gmail.com.

(5) Research projects in the Phonetics Lab

Work with Prof. Rebecca Scarborough and her lab members on research on the production and perception of spoken language. Ongoing projects investigate different listener-directed clear speech strategies, word-specific phonetic variation, and the use of low-level pronunciation details (like vowel nasality) in perceiving words. We are currently focusing on English, French, and Portuguese, but are interested in exploring the languages you know too. We are looking for responsible and motivated students to help run experiments, develop stimuli, make acoustic measurements, and help with analysis. Students who have taken Ling 3100 and/or who have experience with Praat are especially encouraged to apply, as are students with less experience who are willing to learn. We are also interested in students with programming experience to help script experiments. Work is flexible, during the semester or the summer. If interested, please contact Rebecca Scarborough at rebecca.scarborough@colorado.edu.