Limited Campus Competitions

Throughout the year, RIO coordinates numerous Limited Campus Competitions. These internal competitions are required because many private foundations and federal government programs only allow a limited number of applicants from invited institutions, like the University of Colorado Boulder. The goal is to identify the strongest projects with the highest likelihood of getting funded. Any interested applicant should review the campus procedures below for limited campus competitions.

To sign up for our limited submission bulletin, or if you are aware of a limited program not listed, please email Ryan Reeves at ltdsubs@colorado.edu.

    Anticipated Opportunities and Previous Winners

    Procedures for Limited Campus Competitions

    1. Publicizing Opportunities
      1. Website: RIO maintains a webpage that lists active internal campus competitions; active “Calls for Interest,” which are used to determine if there is sufficient interest on campus to hold an internal competition; and a forecast of anticipated opportunities, based on previous competitions and program cycles.
      2. Email: RIO publishes a bi-weekly "bulletin" via email to campus stakeholders who are interested in receiving notices when limited campus competitions are announced. To subscribe, click here and enter your information. RIO will send "alerts" when we are made aware of opportunities with imminent deadlines that cannot wait on the bi-weekly bulletin. RIO may also notify specific units and stakeholders via email about opportunities that are focused on certain disciplines or research areas.
      3. If individual faculty or staff become aware of limited submission opportunities not posted through the above sources, they should inform RIO by sending information via email to: ltdsubs@colorado.edu
    2. Internal Application Process
      1. RIO determines a reasonable deadline for expressions of interest for funding opportunities in order to determine if a campus-wide competition is needed. Once this deadline has passed and if there is sufficient interest on campus, an internal competition may be held to determine the strongest application(s) to submit to the sponsor on behalf of the University of Colorado Boulder. If no interest is received by the deadline, the university's slot to apply will be granted on a first come, first serve basis. 
      2. The limited campus competitions site lists details of the internal application process, including deadlines and proposal requirements. Requirements are based on sponsor guidelines and will vary. Applicants will submit proposals through an online portal with a unique hyperlink, which will be provided on the limited campus competitions site and via email notices.
      3. RIO does not provide any advice or feedback during the internal application process.
      4. If there is insufficient time to administer an internal competition, RIO may render a decision as to whom applies on behalf of the University of Colorado Boulder.
    3. Review Process
      1. Applications are reviewed by the RIO Advisory Board and faculty who have expertise in the relevant subject area(s). The RIO Advisory Board is comprised of faculty members, who are invited by the Vice Chancellor for Research & Innovation, and come from a wide range of disciplines. Based on the evaluations, applicants are selected to submit proposals to sponsors on behalf of the University of Colorado Boulder.
    4. Notification to Applicants
      1. RIO will notify all applicants via email. All applicants will receive comments and feedback on their proposals to help strengthen applications to sponsors.
      2. Internal winners will be provided with instructions on how to proceed with submission of a full proposal to the sponsor, working in conjunction with the Office of Contracts and Grants (OCG).
    5. Expectations for Internal Winners
      1. Faculty selected to move forward with a limited submission proposal on behalf of the University of Colorado Boulder are required to do so. RIO expects selected faculty to make contact with their OCG Proposal Analyst within one-week of being notified by RIO. This one-week window may be shorter depending on the program deadline. 
      2. Even if a sponsor allows a PI to submit on their own, PIs must submit through OCG.
      3. If, for any reason, an internal winner will not submit a proposal to the sponsor, he/she is required to immediately contact ltdsubs@colorado.edu. Typically, other faculty members who have submitted applications for the internal competition will be invited to apply on behalf of the University of Colorado Boulder so the slot is utilized.
        1. For any instance where an internal winner does not apply and neglects to inform RIO, the dean of the internal winner’s respective college will be notified and this will be taken into consideration for future limited submission opportunities.
      4. If an internal winner wishes to appoint another faculty member as PI before the application is submitted to the sponsor, the internal winner must request approval by sending an explanation to ltdsubs@colorado.edu. Changes in PI must be approved by RIO.
      5. For projects involving cost-share, it is incumbent upon the selected faculty to secure appropriate financial commitments. Cost-share commitments should be in place as part of the internal campus competition process. RIO typically only contributes matching funds for equipment and/or facilities for equipment. Typical matches total $50,000, with $25,000 from RIO and the remaining $25,000 from units or colleges.
      6. RIO expects applicants to send a copy of the submitted proposal to ltdsubs@colorado.edu and to keep RIO informed of the proposal status and if it is funded or not.
      7. As an internal winner, you agree to provide advice, feedback from the sponsor, etc. to the following year’s internal winner and RIO, upon RIO’s request. 

    Active Internal Competitions

    https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17574/nsf17574.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT...

    A well-prepared, innovative science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workforce is crucial to the Nation's health and economy. Indeed, recent policy actions and reports have drawn attention to the opportunities and challenges inherent in increasing the number of highly qualified STEM graduates, including STEM teachers. Priorities include educating students to be leaders and innovators in emerging and rapidly changing STEM fields as well as educating a scientifically literate populace. Both of these priorities depend on the nature and quality of the undergraduate education experience. In addressing these STEM challenges and priorities, the National Science Foundation invests in evidence-based and evidence-generating approaches to understanding STEM learning; to designing, testing, and studying instruction and curricular change; to wide dissemination and implementation of best practices; and to broadening participation of individuals and institutions in STEM fields. The goals of these investments include: increasing the number and diversity of STEM students; preparing students well to participate in science for tomorrow; and improving students' STEM learning outcomes.

    NSF's Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (IUSE) initiative, launched in Fiscal Year 2014, supports a coherent set of investments to address immediate challenges and opportunities that are facing undergraduate STEM education, as well as those that anticipate new structures (e.g. organizational changes, new methods for certification or credentialing, course re-conception, cyberlearning, etc.) and new functions of the undergraduate learning and teaching enterprise. The NSF-wide IUSE initiative acknowledges the variety of discipline-specific challenges and opportunities facing STEM faculty as they strive to incorporate results from educational research into classroom practice and work with education research colleagues and social science learning scholars to advance our understanding of effective teaching and learning.

    The Directorate for Geosciences (GEO) contributes to the IUSE initiative through the Improving Undergraduate STEM Education: Pathways into Geoscience (IUSE: GEOPATHS) funding opportunity. IUSE: GEOPATHS invites proposals that specifically address the current needs and opportunities related to undergraduate education within the geosciences community. The primary goal of the IUSE: GEOPATHS funding opportunity is to increase the number of undergraduate students interested in pursuing undergraduate degrees and/or post-graduate degrees in geoscience through the design and testing of novel approaches for engaging students in authentic, career-relevant experiences in geoscience. In order to broaden participation in the geosciences, engaging undergraduate students from traditionally underrepresented groups or from non-geoscience degree programs is a priority. The IUSE: GEOPATHS solicitation features two funding tracks: (1) Engaging students in the geosciences through extra-curricular experiences and training activities (GEOPATHS-EXTRA), and (2) Improving pathways into the geosciences through institutional collaborations and transfer (GEOPATHS-IMPACT).

    Deadlines

    Internal CU Deadline: 11:59pm MST July 24, 2017

    NSF Letter of Intent Deadline: 5:00pm MST August 18, 2017

    NSF Full Proposal Deadline: 5:00pm MST October 10, 2017

    Internal Application Requirements (all in PDF format)

    • Up to 2-page proposal

    To access the online application, visit: https://cuboulderovcr.secure-platform.com/a/solicitations/home/3129

    Eligibility

    Proposals may only be submitted by the following:

    • Universities and Colleges - Universities and two- and four-year colleges (including community colleges) accredited in, and having a campus located in, the US acting on behalf of their faculty members. Such organizations also are referred to as academic institutions. 

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    An organization may serve as sole submitting institution or as lead institution of a collaborative project on only one submission per competition, regardless of track, but may serve as the non-lead institution of a collaborative project more than once per competition. Additional eligibility requirements are described later in the solicitation.

    Potential PIs are advised to contact their institutional office of research regarding processes used to select proposals for submission.

    A Principal Investigator may serve in the role of PI or Co-PI on only one proposal per competition if they are at the sole-submitting institution or the lead institution of a collaborative project, but may serve as the Co-PI for a non-lead institution of a collaborative project more than once per competition.

    Award Information and Duration

    Regardless of which track is selected, the program expects to offer approximately 16 awards, with the average total award size expected to be in the $300,000 to $350,000 range. The duration of awards for both tracks will be up to 36 months. Estimated program budget, number of awards and average award size/duration are subject to the availability of funds.

    https://www.neh.gov/grants/research/summer-stipends

    Program Summary 

    Summer Stipends support individuals pursuing advanced research that is of value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both.

    Eligible projects usually result in articles, monographs, books, digital materials and publications, archaeological site reports, translations, or editions. Projects must not result solely in the collection of data; instead they must also incorporate analysis and interpretation.

    Summer Stipends support continuous full-time work on a humanities project for a period of two consecutive months. Summer Stipends support projects at any stage of development.

    Deadlines

    Internal CU Deadline: 11:59pm MST August 1, 2017

    NEH Deadline: September 27, 2017

    Internal Application Requirements (all in PDF format)

    • Up to 2-page proposal
    • Up to 2-page curriculum vitae

    To access the online application, visit: https://cuboulderovcr.secure-platform.com/a/solicitations/home/3123

    Eligibility

    The Summer Stipends program accepts applications from individual researchers, teachers, and scholars, whether they have an institutional affiliation or not. Applicants with college or university affiliations must, however, be nominated by their institutions.

    Organizations are not eligible to apply for Summer Stipends.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Each college and university in the United States and its jurisdictions may nominate two faculty members.

    Award Information and Duration

    Summer Stipends provide $6,000 for two consecutive months of research and writing. Recipients must work full-time on their projects for these two months and may hold other research grants supporting the same project during this time. Summer Stipends normally support work carried out during the summer months, but arrangements can be made for other times of the year.

    http://blavatnikawards.org/awards/national-awards/nomination-guidelines/

    Program Summary 

    ***Note that the programmatic information below is from last year and will be updated once the Blavatnik Family Foundation publishes the 2018 guidance.***

    The Blavatnik National Awards for Young Scientists recognize the country’s most promising faculty-rank researchers in Life Sciences, Physical Sciences & Engineering, and Chemistry. One Blavatnik Laureate in each disciplinary category will receive $250,000 in unrestricted funds.

    Deadlines

    Internal CU Deadline: 11:59pm MST September 5, 2017

    Blavatnik Family Foundation Deadline: TBD

    Internal Application Requirements (all in PDF format)

    • Up to 2-page proposal: provide the nominee's research summary (maximum 1,000 words);
    • Up to 2-page curriculum vitae (CV);
    • (2) 1 page letters of support: letters should be from someone familiar with the nominee's scientific contributions and a maximum of two pages, single-spaced; letters should describe the nominee’s most significant research contributions according to the quality, impact, novelty, and promise criteria and explain their importance for the nominee’s research area; assess the nominee’s accomplishments in comparison with those of his or her peers at the same career stage; and focus on the nominee’s scientific accomplishments during his/her independent career and omit the details of the graduate and postdoctoral work or information typically included in the CV, such as positions and awards;
    • Identify the 1 category under which the application is being submitted: Life Sciences, Physical Sciences & Engineering, or Chemistry.

    To access the online application, visit: https://cuboulderovcr.secure-platform.com/a/solicitations/home/3127

    Eligibility

    The nominee must:

    • Have been born in or after 1976.
    • Hold a doctoral degree (PhD, DPhil, MD, DDS, DVM, etc.).
    • Currently hold a faculty position at an invited institution in the United States.
    • Currently conduct research as a principal investigator in one of the disciplinary categories in Life Sciences, Physical Sciences & Engineering, or Chemistry.

    Previously nominated individuals who were not selected as Laureates in past Awards cycles may be nominated again. The Blavatnik Awards welcomes nominations from underrepresented groups in science and engineering.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Candidates for the Blavatnik National Awards must be nominated by their institutions. Each institution may submit up to three nominations, one in each disciplinary category of Life Sciences, Physical Sciences & Engineering, and Chemistry.

    Institutional nominations must be submitted by the institution’s President (or equivalent), Provost, or their official designee. Institutions must send a brief statement to blavatnikawards@nyas.org naming the official designees as nominators before submitting nominations.

    Self-nominations are not allowed. Nominees do not submit their own nomination materials and should direct all questions to their institution’s official nominator.

    Award Information

    One Blavatnik Laureate in each disciplinary category will receive $250,000 in unrestricted funds.

    https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/nsf15504/nsf15504.htm

    Program Summary 

    ***For the internal campus competition, RIO will select one acquisition or development application with a budget over $1 million. This application should be regional in focus with a large scope of work. RIO encourages applications of all types, but will select one acquisition or development project with high impact potential.

    Per NSF, “Proposals requesting over $1 million should address the potential impact of the instrument on the research community of interest and at the regional or national level when appropriate. For large multi-user instruments that provide service beyond a single institution, concrete plans for enabling access by external users (including those from non-Ph.D. and/or minority-serving institutions) through physical or virtual access should be presented, and the uniqueness of the requested instrument should also be described.”***

    The Major Research Instrumentation Program (MRI) serves to increase access to shared scientific and engineering instruments for research and research training in our Nation's institutions of higher education, not-for-profit museums, science centers and scientific/engineering research organizations. The program provides organizations with opportunities to acquire major instrumentation that supports the research and research training goals of the organization and that may be used by other researchers regionally or nationally.

    Each MRI proposal may request support for the acquisition (Track 1) or development (Track 2) of a single research instrument for shared inter- and/or intra-organizational use. Development efforts that leverage the strengths of private sector partners to build instrument development capacity at MRI submission-eligible organizations are encouraged.

    The MRI program assists with the acquisition or development of a shared research instrument that is, in general, too costly and/or not appropriate for support through other NSF programs. The program does not fund research projects or provide ongoing support for operating or maintaining facilities or centers.

    The instrument acquired or developed is expected to be operational for regular research use by the end of the award period. For the purposes of the MRI program, a proposal must be for either acquisition (Track 1) or development (Track 2) of a single, well-integrated instrument. The MRI program does not support the acquisition or development of a suite of instruments to outfit research laboratories or facilities, or that can be used to conduct independent research activities simultaneously.

    Instrument acquisition or development proposals that request funds from NSF in the range $100,000-$4 million may be accepted from any MRI-eligible organization. Proposals that request funds from NSF less than $100,000 may also be accepted from any MRI-eligible organization for the disciplines of mathematics or social, behavioral and economic sciences and from non-Ph.D.-granting institutions of higher education for all NSF-supported disciplines.

    Cost-sharing of precisely 30% of the total project cost is required for Ph.D.-granting institutions of higher education and for non-degree-granting organizations. Non-Ph.D.-granting institutions of higher education are exempt from cost-sharing and cannot include it. National Science Board policy is that voluntary committed cost sharing is prohibited.

    Please see the solicitation text for definitions of organizational types used by the MRI program.

    Deadlines

    Internal CU Deadline: 11:59pm MST September 27, 2017

    NSF Deadline: January 10, 2018

    Internal Application Requirements (all in PDF format)

    • Up to 3-page proposal
      • Instrument Acquisition Proposals should attest to:
        • The extent of shared use of the instrumentation for research and/or research training.
        • Whether the management plan includes sufficient infrastructure and technical expertise to allow effective usage of the instrument.
        • The organization's commitment to ensuring successful operations and maintenance over the expected lifetime of the instrument.
        • Whether the request is justified and reasonable in magnitude. If student involvement is included, reviewers will be asked to evaluate the involvement in terms of both instrument needs and training the next generation of instrumentalists.
        • Plans for using the new or enhanced capability in research or research training.
        • For instrument acquisition proposals of $1 million or above, the potential impact of the instrument on the research community of interest at the regional or national level, when appropriate.
          • ***Note that for the internal campus competition, RIO will select one acquisition application with a budget over $1 million. This application should be regional in focus with a large scope of work. RIO encourages applications of all types, but will select one acquisition project with high impact potential.***
      • Instrument Development Proposals should attest to:
        • The appropriateness of submission as a development (Track 2) proposal.
        • The adequacy of the management plan. Does the plan have a realistic, detailed schedule? Are mechanisms in place to deal with potential risks?
        • The availability of appropriate technical expertise to design and construct the instrument. If direct support for student involvement in development efforts is requested, reviewers will be asked to evaluate the involvement in terms of both project needs and training the next generation of instrumentalists.
        • The appropriateness of the cost of the new technology.
        • The need for development of a new instrument. Will the proposed instrument enable enhanced performance over existing instruments, or new types of measurement or information gathering? Is there a strong need for the new instrument in the larger user community?
    • Up to 2-page Curriculum Vitae of PI(s)
      • If your project involves more than one PI, please upload one attachment that includes the CVs for all partnering PIs. Each PI's CV should be no more than 2-pages.
    • Up to 2-page Production/Use Plan
      • Describe what data will be produced during the equipment use or development and how this will be managed.
    • 1-page Post-Grant Support Plan
      • Describe support plans for the end of the grant period.
    • Matching Support
      • Provide a signed letter from chairs/deans/directors, indicating which units will provide the required matching, with amounts, and a commitment that they will provide the stated share of the match.

    To access the online application, visit: https://cuboulderovcr.secure-platform.com/a/solicitations/home/3124

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Three (3) as described below. Potential PIs are advised to contact their institutional office of research regarding processes used to select proposals for submission.

    If three proposals are submitted, at least one of the proposals must be for instrument development (i.e., no more than two proposals may be for instrument acquisition).

    To ensure a balanced instrumentation award portfolio at diverse organizations, across varied research topics, and in support of a broadly inclusive science and engineering workforce across the entire Nation, the MRI program requires that an MRI-eligible organization may, as a performing organization, submit or be included as a significantly funded subawardee in no more than three MRI proposals. To promote instrumentation development, the program requires that if an organization submits or is included as a significantly funded subawardee in three MRI proposals, at least one of the three proposals must be for (Track 2) instrument development.

    NSF reserves the right to carefully examine development (Track 2) proposals to ensure that they meet the requirements for this proposal type (see Section II). If a proposal submitted as development is deemed to be an acquisition proposal either before or during the review, the proposal is subject to return without review or decline.

    An unfunded collaboration does not count against the submission limit. Inclusion as a funded subawardee on a development (Track 2) proposal at a level in excess of 20% of the total budget requested from NSF, or as a funded subawardee on any acquisition (Track 1) proposal, will be counted against an organization's proposal submission limit. Separately submitted linked collaborative proposals of either type (Track 1 or Track 2) count against the submission limit of each of the submitting organizations. However, if a subaward to an organization in a development (Track 2) proposal is 20% or less of the proposal's total budget request from NSF, the subawardee's submission limit will not be affected. For subawards within a linked collaborative proposal, the 20% threshold applies to the budget request from NSF in the proposal containing the subaward(s), not to the combined budget request from NSF for the collaborative project.

    Note: The 30% cost-sharing requirement applies to only the portion of the total project cost budgeted to non-exempt organizations, including those participating through subawards. When required, cost-sharing must be precisely 30%. Cost sharing is required for Ph.D.-granting institutions of higher education and for non-degree-granting organizations. Non-Ph.D.-granting institutions of higher education are exempt from cost-sharing and cannot provide it. National Science Board policy is that voluntary committed cost sharing is prohibited. See section V.B. for specific information on cost-sharing calculations and the solicitation text for definitions of organizational types used for the MRI program.

    Award Information and Duration

    Proposals submitted in response to this program solicitation will be competing for about $75 million, depending on availability of funds and quality of proposals.

    Proposals that request funds from NSF in the range $100,000-$4 million will be accepted from all eligible organizations. Proposals that request funds from NSF less than $100,000 will also be accepted from all eligible organizations for the disciplines of mathematics or social, behavioral and economic sciences and from non-Ph.D.-granting institutions of higher education for all NSF-supported disciplines.

    Proposers may request an award period up to three years for acquisition proposals and up to five years for development proposals. The anticipated earliest starting date is August 01 in the year of the proposal's submission.

    Active Calls for Interest

    Calls for interest are used to gauge campus interest in applying to certain limited programs. An expression of interest is a simple statement via email from a lead PI indicating interest in applying to a specific program. If there are multiple expressions of interest, an internal campus competition may be held with instructions for internal proposals to be sent out at a later time. If you are interested in a program below, please submit an expression of interest by the posted deadline to Ryan Reeves at ltdsubs@colorado.edu.

    https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17575/nsf17575.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT...

    NSF's Directorate for Engineering (ENG) and the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) have joined to support the Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) in Engineering and Computer Science program. This program supports active long-term collaborative partnerships between K-12 Science, Technology, Engineering, Computer and Information Science, and Mathematics (STEM) in-service and pre-service teachers, full-time community college faculty, and university faculty and students to enhance the scientific disciplinary knowledge and capacity of the STEM teachers and/or community college faculty through participation in authentic summer research experiences with engineering and computer science faculty researchers. The research projects and experiences all revolve around a focused research area related to engineering and/or computer science that will provide a common cohort experience to the participating educators. The K-12 STEM teachers and/or full-time community college faculty also translate their research experiences and new scientific knowledge into their classroom activities and curricula. The university team will include faculty, graduate and undergraduate students as well as industrial advisors. Involvement of graduate students in support of academic-year classroom activities is particularly encouraged. Partnerships with inner city, rural or other high needs schools are especially encouraged, as is participation by underrepresented minorities, women, veterans, and persons with disabilities.

    As part of the long-term partnership arrangements, university undergraduate/graduate students will partner with pre-college/community college faculty in their classrooms during the academic year to support the integration of the RET curricular materials into classroom activities.

    This announcement features two mechanisms for support of in-service and pre-service K-12 STEM teachers and full-time community college faculty: (1) RET supplements to ongoing ENG and CISE awards and (2) new RET Site awards. RET supplements may be included outside this solicitation in proposals for new or renewed ENG and CISE grants or as supplements to ongoing ENG- and CISE-funded projects. RET in Engineering and Computer Science Sites, through this solicitation, are based on independent proposals from engineering and/or computer and/or information science departments, schools or colleges to initiate and conduct research participation projects for K-12 STEM teachers and/or full-time community college faculty.

    Deadlines

    Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: 11:59pm MST July 26, 2017

    NSF Deadline: 5:00pm MST October 10, 2017

    Eligibility

    Proposals may only be submitted by the following:

    • Universities and Colleges - Universities and two- and four-year colleges (including community colleges) accredited in, and having a campus located in, the US acting on behalf of their faculty members. Such organizations also are referred to as academic institutions.

    The principal investigator of a RET in Engineering and Computer Science Site proposal must have a full-time, tenured or tenure-track faculty appointment within a College/Department of Engineering or Engineering Technology or a College/Department of Computer and/or Information Science broadly defined [including e.g., Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), Software Engineering, Networking Science, Informatics] within the submitting U.S. academic institution. The PI must be a full-time Engineering and/or Computer Science faculty member whose primary job responsibilities are research and teaching and not a faculty member who is involved in an administrative capacity such as a dean or outreach coordinator.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Limit on Number of Proposals per Organization: 3

    Three Site proposals may be submitted per competition by a U.S. academic institution, including a College/Department of Engineering, Engineering Technology, or Computer and/or Information Science as the lead institution. No more than two of the three proposals may have an engineering focus and only one of the three proposals may have a computer and/or information science focus.

    Potential PIs are advised to contact their institutional office of research regarding processes used to select proposals for submission.

    Limit on Number of Proposals per PI or Co-PI: 1

    Award Information and Duration

    Estimated Number of Awards: 9

    Anticipated Funding Amount: $5,800,000

    The total anticipated funding in FY 2018, FY 2019 and FY 2020 for both Sites and Supplements is approximately $5,800,000 per year, subject to the availability of funds. It is anticipated that approximately 9 Site awards will be made per year. The maximum total request for a Site is $600,000 for a duration of up to three years. Supplements are limited to a maximum of $10,000 per teacher and/or community college faculty for a duration of one year subject to the availability of funds. 

    http://pac-12.com/conference/sahwbgp

    The aim of research projects should be to improve the health, general well-being, and safety of student-athletes at all Pac-12 member institutions. The Grant Program’s primary focus areas are listed below. Although this is not an exclusive Grant Program focus list, priority will be given to those research projects targeted at the focus areas below. Priority also will be given to research projects that are the result of collaboration amongst multiple Pac-12 member institutions and/or organizations that are directly affiliated with Pac-12 member institutions. Proposals that are applicable to translational basic science will be considered. Projects should not duplicate other work funded by the Pac-12 Grants Program. Prior grant awardees and their research projects may be found at: http://pac-12.com/conference/sahwbgp/prior-grant-awardees

    • Head Trauma
    • Mental Health
    • Cardiac
    • Overuse Injuries / Injury Prevention
    • Temperature matters (heat/cold) / Hydration
    • Emergency Care – Planning / Prevention of Emergent Medical Events
    • Nutrition

    Deadlines

    Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: 11:59pm MST July 27, 2017

    PAC-12 Letter of Intent Deadline: 6:00pm MST September 15, 2017

    PAC-12 Full Proposal Deadline: 6:00pm MST October 2, 2017

    Eligibility

    Principal Investigators (“PIs”) and Co-Investigators (“Co-PIs”) must be employed by a current Pac-12 member institution or an organization that is directly affiliated with a Pac-12 member institution, and must meet their employer’s requirements for such status. Third-party entities/partners are eligible to receive Grant Program funding provided that its submission is sponsored by, and the research is coordinated with, a Pac-12 member institution(s) involving only Pac- 12 athletes. Third-party entities/partners that are interested in collaborating in Pac-12 supported research projects should contact Pac-12 member institutions directly or the Pac-12 to find possible research partners.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Each Pac-12 institution will be limited to three submissions. All submissions must come through the institution’s grant office and be endorsed by the institution’s Pac-12 Student Athlete Health and Well-Being Board representative.

    Award Information

    Since 2015, the Pac-12 has made approximately $3,500,000 available on an annual basis for the Pac12 Student-Athlete Health and Well-Being Grant Program (the “Grant Program”) awards and direct institutional athletic department support. Any unused funds from one fiscal year of the Grant Program will roll over to the next Grant Program cycle. Multi-year projects will be considered. The Pac-12 funds institutional grants and direct institutional athletic department funding for proposed projects. Appendix A, Part 3 Budget and Justification, sets forth the requirements for direct institutional athletic department funding.

    https://simonsfoundation.s3.amazonaws.com/share/mps/rfns/2018/Simons_Inv...

    ***When submitting your expression of interest, please specify which of the three programs (Mathematics, Physics, Astrophysics, or Computer Science) under which you are making a nomination.***

    The Simons Investigators in Mathematics, (Theoretical) Physics, (Theoretical) Astrophysics and Theoretical Computer Science program aims to provide a stable base of support for outstanding scientists, enabling them to undertake longterm investigations of fundamental questions in their fields. The intent of the program is to support these scientists in their most productive years, when they are establishing new research directions, providing leadership in the field and effectively mentoring junior scientists.

    The Simons Foundation requests that nominations for the Investigators in Mathematics, Physics, Astrophysics and Theoretical Computer Science programs be treated confidentially — the nominees should not know they are being nominated, if possible.

    Deadlines

    Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: 11:59pm MST July 31, 2017

    Simons Foundation Deadline: 9:59pm MST October 31, 2017

    Eligibility

    To be eligible to be nominated for an Investigator award, a scientist must be engaged in theoretical research in mathematics, physics, astrophysics or computer science and must not have previously been a Simons Investigator. He/she must have a primary appointment as a faculty member at an educational institution in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, or Ireland, on a campus within these countries and the primary department affiliation must have a Ph.D. program (note that the appointment need not be in a mathematics, physics or computer science department). At the time of the appointment start date, an Investigator must be tenured.

    The foundation reserves the right to determine eligibility, but, generally, a ‘primary appointment’ is defined as one where the Investigator is a full-time employee of an academic institution with a teaching load that is comparable to that of other faculty members in the same department. Investigators may transfer their awards to new educational institutions within the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, or Ireland, subject to approval from the foundation and the old and new institutions. The award will be interrupted or terminated, at the foundation’s discretion, if an Investigator (i) takes up a primary long-term position at a research institute, national laboratory or other institution outside the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, or Ireland or another campus of their current institution, which falls outside the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, or Ireland; (ii) at a for-profit organization; or (iii) accepts a major administrative responsibility that significantly reduces the time available for research.

    Investigators are not eligible to hold a Simons Fellowship or another Simons Investigator award for the duration of the Simons Investigator award.

    Investigators are expected to attend annual meetings, held at the Simons Foundation each fall, to discuss their activities. Costs associated with attending this meeting will be covered by the foundation.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    The foundation asks each university to submit nominations confidentially, up to two nominees in each of Mathematics, Physics, Astrophysics and Theoretical Computer Science programs.

    Award Information and Duration

    Investigators are appointed for an initial period of five years. Renewal for an additional five years may be considered, contingent upon the evaluation of scientific impact of the Investigator. Renewal beyond the ten-year period will not be considered. Appointments will begin August 1, 2018.

    An Investigator award provides $100,000 per year in research support for the Investigator and $10,000 per year to the Investigator’s department. The award will be administered through the Investigator’s institution, which will receive an additional 20 percent per year in indirect costs.

    An Investigator position may be interrupted and resumed for reasons that would normally justify a leave from a university, such as illness, the need to care for family members or time off for national service. Periods of sabbatical or research leave do not count as interrupting the Investigator position. Support may be withdrawn at any time at the discretion of the foundation, but it is expected that termination of the award at times other than five or ten years would occur only in rare cases.

    In 2018, the foundation expects to appoint up to three Investigators in mathematics, up to five in physics, up to two in astrophysics and up to two in theoretical computer science.

    https://simonsfoundation.s3.amazonaws.com/share/mps/rfns/2018/Simons_Inv...

    The Simons Foundation invites nominations for Simons Investigators in the Mathematical Modeling of Living Systems (MMLS), a joint program of the Mathematics and Physical Sciences and Life Sciences divisions of the Simons Foundation. Investigators in MMLS are outstanding scientists, often with mathematics or theoretical physics backgrounds, now engaged in research based on mathematical modeling in the life sciences.

    New approaches in mathematically based modeling are making increasingly important contributions to the life sciences. The MMLS program aims to support such approaches and foster a scientific culture of theory-experiment collaborations similar to that prevailing in the physical sciences. To encourage young researchers to pursue this endeavor, the MMLS program will provide a long-term, stable base of support, enabling a focus on model-based approaches to important issues in the life sciences.

    A broad spectrum of research areas within the life sciences will be considered, ranging from cellular-level issues of organization, regulation, signaling and morphogenic dynamics to the properties of organisms and ecology, as well as neuroscience and evolution; however, preference will be given to areas in which modeling approaches are less established and, for this reason, bioinformatics- and genomics-related proposals fall outside the scope of the program. In all cases, preference will be given to work that relates closely to experiment, developing mathematical models that can explain data, suggest new classes of experiments and introduce important, new concepts.

    The intent of the program is to help launch the research careers of outstanding scientists in the early stages of their research career. Nominees to the program should be within the first eight years of their first faculty appointments. Nominations will be evaluated on the basis of nominees’ potential for scientific accomplishments.

    Deadlines

    Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: 11:59pm MST July 31, 2017

    Simons Foundation Deadline: 9:59pm MST October 31, 2017

    Eligibility

    To be eligible to be nominated for a Simons Investigator in MMLS award, a scientist must be engaged in research related to the MMLS program and must not previously have been a Simons Investigator. He/she must have a primary appointment as a faculty member at an educational institution in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, or Ireland, on a campus within these countries, and the primary department affiliation must have a Ph.D. program. At the time of appointment, an Investigator should be in the early stages of an academic career and must be within eight years of the start of his/her first faculty position.

    The foundation reserves the right to determine eligibility, but, generally, a ‘primary appointment’ is defined as one where the Investigator is a full-time employee of an academic institution with a teaching load that is comparable to that of other faculty members in the same department. Investigators may transfer their awards to new educational institutions within the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, or Ireland, subject to approval from the foundation and the old and new institutions. The award will be interrupted or terminated, at the foundation’s discretion, if an Investigator (i) takes up a primary long-term position at a research institute, national laboratory or other institution outside the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, or Ireland or another campus of their current institution, which falls outside the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, or Ireland; (ii) at a for-profit organization; or (iii) accepts a major administrative responsibility that significantly reduces the time available for research.

    Investigators are not eligible to hold a Simons Fellowship or another Simons Investigator award for the duration of the Investigator award.

    Investigators are expected to attend annual meetings, held at the Simons Foundation each fall, to discuss their activities. Costs associated with attending these meetings will be covered by the foundation.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    The foundation asks each university to submit a maximum of two nominations to the MMLS Investigator program.

    Award Information and Duration

    A Simons Investigator in MMLS is appointed for a period of five years. Appointments will begin August 1, 2018.

    An Investigator will receive research support in the amount of $100,000 per year. An additional $10,000 per year will be provided to the Investigator’s department. The award will be administered through the Investigator’s institution, which will receive an additional 20 percent per year in indirect costs. 

    An Investigator position may be interrupted and resumed for reasons that would normally justify a leave from a university, such as illness, the need to care for family members or time off for national service. Periods of sabbatical or research leave do not count as interrupting the Investigator position. Support may be withdrawn at any time at the discretion of the foundation, but it is expected that termination of the award at times other than five years would occur only rarely.

    In 2018, the foundation expects to appoint up to seven Simons Investigators in MMLS.

    https://simonsfoundation.s3.amazonaws.com/share/mps/rfns/2018/Math_X_Inv...

    This program is designed to encourage novel collaborations between mathematics and other fields in science or engineering by providing funds to professors at universities in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, or Ireland to establish programs at the interface between mathematics and other fields of science or engineering.

    Deadlines

    Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: 11:59pm MST July 31, 2017

    Simons Foundation Deadline: 9:59pm MST October 31, 2017

    Eligibility

    Mathematics and X Partner Departments: The X partner should be a department or institute of science or engineering at the Investigator’s university that will engage in significant collaboration with the mathematics department in an area where such collaboration is not the norm. Both departments must have doctoral programs. The foundation will accept proposals for Applied Math+X but not Statistics+X. X partners in finance and business will not be considered. Proposals involving connections to areas where there are already well-established links with mathematics, such as economics, string theory or computational complexity, will also not be considered unless the proposal involves particularly unique collaborations.

    Math+X Investigators: To be eligible to be nominated for a Math+X Investigator award, a scientist must be a current tenured faculty member with a primary appointment in the mathematics department at an institution in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, or Ireland, on a campus within these countries, and currently employed at the institution submitting the nomination. A person with a primary appointment in the statistics department is not eligible. The Investigator will be expected to teach both in the mathematics and the X partner departments and be appointed in both departments by the award’s start date (courtesy appointments will be allowed). There are no citizenship requirements.

    The foundation reserves the right to determine eligibility, but, typically, a ‘primary appointment’ is defined as one where the Investigator is a full-time employee of an academic institution with a teaching load that is comparable to that of other faculty members in the same department. Investigators may transfer their awards to new educational institutions within the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, or Ireland, subject to approval from the foundation and the old and new institutions. The award will be interrupted or terminated, at the foundation’s discretion, if an Investigator (i) takes up a primary long-term position at a research institute, national laboratory or other institution outside the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, or Ireland or another campus of their current institution, which falls outside the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, or Ireland; (ii) at a for-profit organization; or (iii) accepts a major administrative responsibility that significantly reduces the time available for research.

    Investigators are not eligible to hold a Simons Fellowship or another Simons Investigator award for the duration of the Math+X Investigator award.

    Investigators are expected to attend annual meetings, held at the Simons Foundation each fall, to discuss their activities. Costs associated with attending these meetings will be covered by the foundation.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    The foundation asks that universities submit no more than one nomination to the Math+X Investigator program.

    Award Information and Duration

    A Math+X Investigator is appointed for a period of five years and will receive support in the amount of $300,000 per year, which includes up to 20 percent in indirect costs to the Investigator’s institution. Renewal for an additional five years is contingent upon the evaluation of the scientific impact of the Investigator. Renewal beyond the ten-year period will not be considered. Appointments will begin July 1, 2018.

    A Math+X Investigator position may be interrupted and resumed for reasons that would normally justify a leave from a university, such as illness, the need to care for family members or time off for national service. Periods of sabbatical or research leave do not count as interrupting the Investigator position. Support may be withdrawn at any time at the discretion of the foundation, but it is expected that termination of the award at times other than five or ten years would occur only rarely.

    The foundation expects to award up to two Math+X Investigator awards per year.

    https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/nsf15576/nsf15576.htm

    This program seeks to enhance and expand the national resource of digital data documenting existing vouchered biological and paleontological collections and to advance scientific knowledge by improving access to digitized information (including images) residing in vouchered scientific collections across the United States. The information associated with various collections of organisms, such as geographic, paleogeographic and stratigraphic distribution, environmental habitat data, phenology, information about associated organisms, collector field notes, and tissues and molecular data extracted from the specimens, is a rich resource providing the baseline from which to further biodiversity research and provide critical information about existing gaps in our knowledge of life on earth. The national resource is structured at three levels: a central coordinating organization, a series of thematic networks based on an important research theme, and the physical collections. The national resource builds upon a sizable existing national investment in curation of the physical objects in scientific collections and contributes vitally to scientific research and technology interests in the United States. It will become an invaluable tool in understanding contemporary biological issues and challenges.

    Deadlines

    Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: 11:59pm MST August 9, 2017

    NSF Deadline: 5:00pm MST October 13, 2017

    Eligibility

    Proposals may only be submitted by the following:

    • Universities and Colleges - Universities and two- and four-year colleges (including community colleges) accredited in, and having a campus located in, the US acting on behalf of their faculty members. Such organizations also are referred to as academic institutions.
    • Non-profit, non-academic organizations: Independent museums, observatories, research labs, professional societies and similar organizations in the U.S. associated with educational or research activities.
    • State and Local Governments: State educational offices or organizations and local school districts.

    There are no restrictions or limits on who may serve as PI.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Only one Thematic Collections Networks (TCN) proposal may be submitted by any one organization as the lead organization. Organizations may be involved in more than one collaborative effort as a non-lead proposal.

    An individual may appear as PI or co-PI on no more than one ADBC proposal submitted to any annual ADBC competition.

    It is expected that TCN projects will be collaborative efforts among several institutions. Please refer to Chapter II.D.3 of the Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG) for guidance about the submission of collaborative proposals.

    Federally-owned collections are excluded from this solicitation. Partnerships with federal agencies are encouraged.

    Eligibility criteria also apply to all subawards, i.e., organizations ineligible to submit to this program may not receive subawards.

    https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17573/nsf17573.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT...

    The Advancing Informal STEM Learning (AISL) program seeks to advance new approaches to and evidence-based understanding of the design and development of STEM learning opportunities for the public in informal environments; provide multiple pathways for broadening access to and engagement in STEM learning experiences; advance innovative research on and assessment of STEM learning in informal environments; and engage the public of all ages in learning STEM in informal environments.

    The AISL program supports six types of projects: (1) Pilots and Feasibility Studies, (2) Research in Service to Practice, (3) Innovations in Development, (4) Broad Implementation, (5) Literature Reviews, Syntheses, or Meta-Analyses, and (6) Conferences.

    Deadlines

    Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: 11:59pm MST August 9, 2017

    NSF Deadline: 11:59pm MST November 6, 2017

    Eligibility

    The categories of proposers eligible to submit proposals to the National Science Foundation are identified in the NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG), Chapter I.E.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Limit on Number of Proposals per Organization: 3

    An institution or organization may serve as lead on no more than three (3) proposals submitted to the November deadline. However, an institution or organization may partner as a subaward on other proposals submitted.

    Limit on Number of Proposals per PI or Co-PI: 3

    An individual may be included as a Principal Investigator (PI) /Co-PI on no more than three (3) proposals submitted to the November deadline.

    Award Information and Duration

    Estimated Number of Awards: 60 to 85

    Pending availability of funds, it is anticipated that about 15-20 Pilots and Feasibility Studies awards, 8-10 Research in Service To Practice awards, 10-15 Innovations in Development awards, 4-6 Broad Implementation awards, 8-10 Literature Reviews, Syntheses, and/or Meta-analyses awards, and 12-18 Conference awards will be made. AISL will also fund 8-10 awards made through the EAGER, RAPID, Research Coordination Networks (RCN) mechanisms and 2-4 each CAREER awards and REU supplements.

    Anticipated Funding Amount: $33,000,000 to $44,000,000

    Limits for funding requests of AISL proposals are as follows: (1) Pilots and Feasibility projects: up to $300,000 with durations up to two years; (2) Research in Service to Practice projects: from $300,000 to $2,000,000 with durations from two to five years; (3) Innovations in Development projects: $500,000 to $3,000,000 with durations from two to five years; (4) Broad Implementation projects from $1,000,000 to $3,000,000 with durations from three to five years; (5) Literature Reviews, Syntheses, or Meta-analyses projects up to $250,000 with durations of up to two years; and (6) Conferences up to $250,000 with durations of up to two years.

    https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-17-008.html 

    The NIH Director’s Early Independence Awards provide an opportunity for exceptional junior scientists to accelerate their entry into an independent research career by forgoing the traditional post-doctoral training period. Though most newly graduated doctoral-level researchers would benefit by post-doctoral training, a small number of outstanding junior investigators would benefit instead by launching directly into an independent research career. For these select investigators, who have established a record of scientific innovation and research productivity and who have demonstrated unusual leadership, drive, and maturity, post-doctoral training would unnecessarily delay their entry into performing independent research. By the end of the award period, the Early Independence investigator is expected to be competitive for continued funding of his/her research program and for a permanent research-oriented position. The NIH Director’s Early Independence Awards also provide an opportunity for institutions to invigorate their research programs by bringing in the fresh perspectives of the awardees that they host.

    The NIH recognizes a unique and compelling need to promote diversity in the biomedical, behavioral, clinical and social sciences research workforce. The NIH expects all of its efforts to diversify the workforce to lead to the recruitment of the most talented researchers from all groups; to improve the quality of the educational and training environment; to balance and broaden the perspective in setting research priorities; to improve the ability to recruit subjects from diverse backgrounds into clinical research protocols; and to improve the Nation's capacity to address and eliminate health disparities.  Applicant institutions are always encouraged to consider talented researchers from diverse backgrounds underrepresented in biomedical research, including underrepresented racial and ethnic groups, persons with disabilities and women for participation in all NIH-funded research opportunities.

    Deadlines

    Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: N/A; email ltdsubs@colorado.edu if interested

    NIH Letter of Intent Deadline: August 22, 2017

    NIH Application Deadline: September 22, 2017

    Eligibility

    Any individual(s) with the skills, knowledge, and resources necessary to carry out the proposed research as the Program Director(s)/Principal Investigator(s) (PD(s)/PI(s)) is invited to work with his/her organization to develop an application for support. Individuals from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups as well as individuals with disabilities are always encouraged to apply for NIH support. Only single PD/PI applications will be accepted. Applications with multiple PDs/PIs will not be accepted. Only the PD/PI may be listed as a Senior/Key Person and provide a Biographical Sketch.

    Time window for eligibility: Given the focus on early research independence, the date of receipt of the terminal doctoral degree or completion of clinical residency of the PD/PI must be between June 1, 2016 and September 30, 2018.  The clinical fellowship period is NOT included in the clinical residency or equivalent training period. The date of degree receipt is that which appears on the official transcript for the degree. In addition, at the time of application, the PD/PI must not have served as a post-doctoral fellow following a previous doctoral degree for more than twelve months.

    At the time of award, either 1) the Early Independence investigator must have received a PhD, MD, DO, DC, DDS, DVM, OD, DPM, ScD, EngD, Dr PH, DNSc, ND (Doctor of Naturopathy), PharmD, DSW, PsyD, or equivalent doctoral degree from an accredited domestic or foreign institution (it is the responsibility of the sponsoring institution to determine if a foreign doctoral degree is equivalent), or 2) an authorized official of the degree-granting institution must certify that all degree requirements have been met and that the date of degree receipt as appearing on the transcript will be before September 30, 2018.

    Level of effort: Individuals must commit at least 9.6 person-months (i.e., 80% effort of a 12 month appointment) during the first two years of the project period to research supported by the Early Independence Award. In the final three years of the project period, awardees may reduce effort toward the Early Independence Award, but the total effort towards independent research must remain at least 9.6 person-months (i.e., 80% effort of a 12 month appointment).

    Research independence at time of application: Individuals are eligible only if they, at the time of application submission, do not have research independence. Lack of research independence is defined functionally rather than by position title. Eligible individuals must have all the following characteristics:

    • The PD's/PI's current research agenda is set through concurrence with mentors.
    • The PD's/PI's research is funded primarily through support to other investigators (mentored fellowships such as NIH F31 or F32 Fellowships or NSF Graduate Research Fellowships do not preclude eligibility).
    • The PD/PI does not have any space assigned directly by the institution for the conduct of his or her research.
    • The PD/PI, according to institutional policy, cannot apply for an NIH R01 grant without special waiver or exemption from the institution.

    Though PD/PI must not be functionally independent at the time of application submission, they may become functionally independent prior to time of award and still retain eligibility for the award.

    Prospective PDs/PIs should contact appropriate Institutional leaders to seek an appointment in an independent research position.  Alternatively, Institutions may actively recruit eligible junior scientists to apply for support through this program. In either event, the Institution will be expected to provide substantial support for the junior scientist as detailed below. To foster independence, it may behoove PDs/PIs to be hosted by institutions other than the ones at which they trained. 

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Only up to two applications per institution are allowed.

    Procedures for Limited Campus Competitions

    Award Information and Duration

    The NIH Common Fund intends to commit approximately $4,000,000 to support approximately 10 awards in FY 2018, contingent upon availability of funds and receipt of a sufficient number of meritorious applications. Future year amounts will depend on annual appropriations and satisfactory progress.

    Awards will be for up to $250,000 in direct costs per year, plus applicable Facilities and Administrative (F&A) costs. The project period is limited to five years.

    https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-17-312.html

    Program Summary 

    The NIH Research Education Program (R25) supports research education activities in the mission areas of the NIH.  The over-arching goal of this NINDS Neuroscience Development for Advancing the Careers of a Diverse Research Workforce R25 program is to support educational activities that enhance the diversity of the biomedical, behavioral and clinical research workforce by (1) increasing the pool of current and future Ph.D.-level research scientists from diverse backgrounds underrepresented in biomedical neuroscience research; and (2) facilitating the career advancement/transition of the participants to the next step of their neuroscience careers.

    To accomplish the stated over-arching goal, this FOA will support creative educational activities with a primary focus on NINDS relevant research experiences, mentoring activities that enhance competencies or leadership education and courses on skills development.  Programs that target transitions and/or more than one career stage for neuroscience career advancement and progression are strongly encouraged. NINDS support for this R25 program relies equally on scientific merit and programmatic considerations. Consequently, we recommend that potential applicants contact Scientific/Research staff at NINDS before preparing an application. NINDS will not support projects if they do not fulfill current programmatic priorities at NINDS.

    Deadlines

    Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: N/A; email ltdsubs@colorado.edu if interested

    NIH Letter of Intent Deadline: 5:00pm MST August 25, 2017

    NIH Application Deadline: 5:00pm MST September 25, 2017

    Eligibility

    Any individual(s) with the skills, knowledge, and resources necessary to carry out the proposed research as the Program Director(s)/Principal Investigator(s) (PD(s)/PI(s)) is invited to work with his/her organization to develop an application for support. Individuals from diverse backgrounds, including underrepresented racial and ethnic groups, individuals with disabilities, and women are always encouraged to apply for NIH support.

    For institutions/organizations proposing multiple PDs/PIs, visit the Multiple Program Director/Principal Investigator Policy and submission details in the Senior/Key Person Profile (Expanded) Component of the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide.

    The PD/PI should be an established investigator in the scientific area in which the application is targeted and capable of providing both administrative and scientific leadership to the development and implementation of the proposed program. The PD/PI will be expected to monitor and assess the program and submit all documents and reports as required.

    The proposed PD/PI should hold a basic or health professional degree (e.g., Ph.D., M.D., or equivalent), and have clearly demonstrated training/mentoring credentials. The PD/PI must have a regular, full-time appointment (i.e., not adjunct, part-time, retired, or emeritus) at the applicant institution and should have research, teaching, and/or academic administrative experience.

    If a scientific society is identified as the applicant organization, the advisory board of the given scientific society or organization should identify an affiliated member to serve as PD/PI and work with them to develop an application for support.

    The NIH will not accept duplicate or highly overlapping applications under review at the same time.  This means that the NIH will not accept:

    • A new (A0) application that is submitted before issuance of the summary statement from the review of an overlapping new (A0) or resubmission (A1) application.
    • A resubmission (A1) application that is submitted before issuance of the summary statement from the review of the previous new (A0) application.
    • An application that has substantial overlap with another application pending appeal of initial peer review (see NOT-OD-11-101).

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Only one application per institution is allowed.

    Award Information and Duration

    The number of awards is contingent upon NIH appropriations and the submission of a sufficient number of meritorious applications. Application budgets are limited to a maximum of $250,000 direct cost per year, and must reflect the actual needs of the proposed project. The scope of the proposed project should determine the project period. The maximum project period is 5 years.

    https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-17-210.html

    The NIH Research Education Program (R25) supports research education activities in the mission areas of the NIH. The over-arching goal of this National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) R25 program is to support educational activities that enhance the diversity of the biomedical research workforce.

    To accomplish the stated over-arching goal, this FOA will support creative educational activities with a primary focus on Courses for Skills Development, Research Experiences, and Curriculum or Methods Development. A program application must include each activity, and describe how they will be synergized to make a comprehensive program.

    The Bridges to Baccalaureate Program is intended to provide these activities to community college students to increase transition to and completion of Bachelor's degree in biomedical sciences. 

    This program requires partnerships between community colleges or other two-year post-secondary educational institutions granting the associate degree with colleges or universities that offer the baccalaureate degree. 

    Additionally, recruitment and retention plans are required as part of the application.

    Deadlines

    Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: N/A; email ltdsubs@colorado.edu if interested

    NIH Deadline: 5:00pm MST September 25, 2017

    Eligibility

    Program Directors/Principal Investigators (PD(s)/PI(s))

    All PD(s)/PI(s) must have an eRA Commons account. PD(s)/PI(s) should work with their organizational officials to either create a new account or to affiliate their existing account with the applicant organization in eRA Commons. If the PD/PI is also the organizational Signing Official, they must have two distinct eRA Commons accounts, one for each role. Obtaining an eRA Commons account can take up to 2 weeks.

    Eligible Individuals (Program Director/Principal Investigator)

    Any individual(s) with the skills, knowledge, and resources necessary to carry out the proposed research as the Program Director(s)/Principal Investigator(s) (PD(s)/PI(s)) is invited to work with his/her organization to develop an application for support. Individuals from diverse backgrounds, including underrepresented racial and ethnic groups, individuals with disabilities, and women are always encouraged to apply for NIH support.

    For institutions/organizations proposing multiple PDs/PIs, visit the Multiple Program Director/Principal Investigator Policy and submission details in the Senior/Key Person Profile (Expanded) Component of the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide.

    The PD/PI should be an established investigator in the scientific area in which the application is targeted and capable of providing both administrative and scientific leadership to the development and implementation of the proposed program. The PD/PI will be expected to monitor and assess the program and submit all documents and reports as required.

    Applicants must designate a PD/PI from each participating institution (lead/grantee and partner institutions). The PD/PI of the Lead Institution must be designated as the Contact PD/PI. The PDs/PIs must have a regular full-time appointment (i.e., not adjunct, part-time, retired, or emeritus) at their respective institutions, and should have student counseling, academic administrative and/or scientific research experience. The PDs/PIs will be expected to monitor and assess the program and submit all documents and reports as required.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Applicant organizations may not submit more than one application as the Lead Institution. 

    Procedures for Limited Campus Competitions

    Award Information and Duration

    Application budgets are limited to $300,000 direct costs per year. The scope of the proposed project should determine the project period. The maximum project period is 5 years.

    https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-17-209.html

    The NIH Research Education Program (R25) supports research education activities in the mission areas of the NIH.  The over-arching goal of this National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) R25 program is to support educational activities that enhance the diversity of the biomedical research workforce.

    To accomplish the stated over-arching goal, this FOA will support creative educational activities with a primary focus on Courses for Skills Development and Research Experiences

    The Bridges to Doctorate Program is intended to provide these educational activities to Master's level students to increase transition to and completion of Ph.D.'s in biomedical sciences. A program application must include each educational activity, and describe how they will be synergized to make a comprehensive program.

    This program requires partnerships between master's degree-granting institutions with doctorate degree-granting institutions.

    Additionally, recruitment and retention plans are required as part of the application.

    Deadlines

    Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: N/A; email ltdsubs@colorado.edu if interested

    NIH Deadline: 5:00pm MST September 25, 2017

    Eligibility

    Program Directors/Principal Investigators (PD(s)/PI(s))

    All PD(s)/PI(s) must have an eRA Commons account.  PD(s)/PI(s) should work with their organizational officials to either create a new account or to affiliate their existing account with the applicant organization in eRA Commons. If the PD/PI is also the organizational Signing Official, they must have two distinct eRA Commons accounts, one for each role. Obtaining an eRA Commons account can take up to 2 weeks.

    Eligible Individuals (Program Director/Principal Investigator)

    Any individual(s) with the skills, knowledge, and resources necessary to carry out the proposed research as the Program Director(s)/Principal Investigator(s) (PD(s)/PI(s)) is invited to work with his/her organization to develop an application for support. Individuals from diverse backgrounds, including underrepresented racial and ethnic groups, individuals with disabilities, and women are always encouraged to apply for NIH support.

    For institutions/organizations proposing multiple PDs/PIs, visit the Multiple Program Director/Principal Investigator Policy and submission details in the Senior/Key Person Profile (Expanded) Component of the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide.

    The PD/PI should be an established investigator in the scientific area in which the application is targeted and capable of providing both administrative and scientific leadership to the development and implementation of the proposed program. The PD/PI will be expected to monitor and assess the program and submit all documents and reports as required.

    Applicants must designate a PD/PI from each participating institution (lead/grantee and partner institutions). The PD/PI of the Lead Institution must be designated as the Contact PD/PI.  The PDs/PIs must have a regular full-time appointment (i.e., not adjunct, part-time, retired, or emeritus) at their respective institutions, and should have student counseling, academic administrative and/or scientific research experience. The PDs/PIs will be expected to monitor and assess the program and submit all documents and reports as required.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Applicant organizations may not submit more than one application as the Lead Institution. 

    Procedures for Limited Campus Competitions

    Award Information and Duration

    Application budgets are limited to $300,000 direct costs per year. The scope of the proposed project should determine the project period. The maximum project period is 5 years.

    https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-16-103.html

    Program Summary 

    The purpose of the Institutional Research and Academic Career Development Award (IRACDA) Program is to develop a group of highly trained biomedical scientists to address the Nation’s biomedical workforce needs. The strategy is to promote effective partnerships between research-intensive institutions (RII) and partner institutions that have a historical mission or a demonstrated commitment to educating students from backgrounds underrepresented in the biomedical research enterprise of the nation. The IRACDA program provides support for a traditional mentored postdoctoral research experience at an RII combined with an opportunity for these fellows to develop critical academic skills, including teaching, through workshops and mentored teaching assignments at a partner institution. The primary goals of the IRACDA program are to (1) develop a group of highly trained biomedical scientists who have the necessary knowledge and skills to pursue independent research and teaching careers in academia; and (2) enhance science educational offerings at partner institutions, and promote links between RII and the partner institution(s) through research and teaching collaborations.

    Deadlines

    Internal Expression of Interest Deadline:  N/A; email ltdsubs@colorado.edu if interested

    NIH Deadline: 5:00pm MST September 19, 2017

    Eligibility

    An IRACDA program involves a consortium of multiple institutions. The lead applicant institution must be an RII, and it must serve as the primary site of the postdoctoral research experience.

    Partner Institutions

    The consortium must include one or more partners that are institutions which, for the purposes of this FOA, are defined as public or private nonprofit universities, two-year or four-year colleges or universities, offering associate and/or baccalaureate degrees with a historical mission or a demonstrated commitment to educating students from diverse backgrounds underrepresented in biomedical research as defined in NOT-OD-15-053.

    The sponsoring institution must assure support for the proposed program.

    The applicant institution must have a strong and high-quality research program in the area(s) proposed under this FOA and must have the requisite faculty and facilities on site to conduct the proposed institutional program. In many cases, it is anticipated that the proposed program will complement other ongoing career development programs occurring at the applicant institution and that a substantial number of program faculty will have active research projects in which participating scholars may gain relevant experiences consistent with their research interests and goals.

    Program Directors/Principal Investigators (PD(s)/PI(s))

    All PD(s)/PI(s) must have an eRA Commons account.  PD(s)/PI(s) should work with their organizational officials to either create a new account or to affiliate their existing account with the applicant organization in eRA Commons.If the PD/PI is also the organizational Signing Official, they must have two distinct eRA Commons accounts, one for each role. Obtaining an eRA Commons account can take up to 2 weeks.

    Eligible Individuals (Program Director/Principal Investigator)

    Any individual(s) with the skills, knowledge, and resources necessary to carry out the proposed research training program as the Training Program Director/Principal Investigator (Training PD/PI) is invited to work with his/her organization to develop an application for support. Individuals from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups as well as individuals with disabilities are always encouraged to apply for NIH support.

    For institutions/organizations proposing multiple PDs/PIs, visit the Multiple Program Director/Principal Investigator Policy and submission details in the Senior/Key Person Profile (Expanded) Component of the SF 424 (R&R) Application Guide.

    The PD/PI should be an established investigator in the scientific area in which the application is targeted and capable of providing both administrative and scientific leadership to the development and implementation of the proposed program. The PD/PI will be expected to monitor and assess the program and submit all documents and reports as required.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Only one application per institution is allowed.

    Award Information and Duration

    Application budgets are not limited, but need to reflect the actual needs of the proposed project.

    The scope of the proposed project should determine the project period. The maximum project period is 5 years.