Limited Campus Competitions

Throughout the year, RIO coordinates numerous Limited Campus Competitions. These competitions are required because many private foundations and federal government programs only allow a limited number of applicants from invited institutions, like CU Boulder.

The review process is conducted by a group of faculty who are invited by the Vice Chancellor for Research & Innovation to serve on the RIO Advisory Board. Based on their evaluations, nominees are selected to compete for these limited awards. To sign up for our limited submission newsletter or if you are aware of a limited program not listed, please email Ryan Reeves at ltdsubs@colorado.edu.

    Anticipated Opportunities and Previous Winners

    Procedures for Limited Campus Competitions

    1. Publicizing Opportunities
      1. Website: RIO maintains a webpage that lists active internal campus competitions (hyperlink); active “Calls for Interest,” which are used to determine if there is sufficient interest on campus to hold an internal competition; and a forecast of anticipated opportunities(hyperlink), based on previous competitions and program cycles.
      2. Email: RIO maintains a “limited submission subscriber listserv” of campus stakeholders who are interested in receiving notices when limited campus competitions are announced. To join this listserv, click here. RIO also notifies specific units and stakeholders via email about opportunities that are focused on certain disciplines or research areas.
      3. If individual faculty or staff become aware of limited submission opportunities not posted through the above sources, they should inform RIO by sending information via email to: ltdsubs@colorado.edu
    2. Internal Application Process
      1. If there is sufficient interest on campus, an internal competition may be held to determine the strongest application(s) to submit to the sponsor on behalf of the University of Colorado Boulder.
      2. The limited campus competitions site (hyperlink) lists details of the internal application process, including deadlines and proposal requirements. Requirements are based on sponsor guidelines and will vary. Applicants will submit proposals through an online portal with a unique hyperlink, which will be provided on the limited campus competitions site and via email notices.
      3. RIO does not provide any advice or feedback during the internal application process.
      4. If there is insufficient time to administer an internal competition, RIO may render a decision as to whom applies on behalf of the University of Colorado Boulder.
      5. Some funding opportunities are strictly focused on disciplines pertinent to specific colleges or departments. In these instances, RIO may delegate its authority and internal competitions may be held at the college/department level. It is incumbent upon colleges/departments to inform RIO of the internal winner(s).
    3. Review Process
      1. Applications are reviewed by the RIO Advisory Board and faculty who have expertise in the relevant subject area(s). The RIO Advisory Board is comprised of faculty members, who are invited by the Vice Chancellor for Research and Innovation, and come from a wide range of disciplines. Based on the evaluations, applicants are selected to submit proposals to sponsors on behalf of the University of Colorado Boulder.
    4. Notification to Applicants
      1. The Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research and Innovation will notify all applicants via email. All applicants will receive comments and feedback on their proposals to help strengthen applications to sponsors.
      2. Internal winners will be provided with instructions on how to proceed with submission of a full proposal to the sponsor, working in conjunction with the Office of Contracts and Grants (OCG).
    5. Expectations for Internal Winners
      1. Faculty selected to move forward with a limited submission proposal on behalf of the University of Colorado Boulder are required to do so. RIO expects selected faculty to make contact with their OCG Proposal Analyst within one-week of being notified by RIO. This one-week window may be shorter depending on the program deadline.
      2. If, for any reason, an internal winner will not submit a proposal to the sponsor, he/she is required to immediately contact ltdsubs@colorado.edu. Typically, other faculty members who have submitted applications for the internal competition will be invited to apply on behalf of the University of Colorado Boulder.
        1. For any instance where a faculty member does not apply and neglects to inform RIO, this will be taken into consideration for future limited submission opportunities.
      3. For projects involving cost share, it is incumbent upon the selected faculty to secure appropriate financial commitments.
      4. RIO expects applicants to keep ltdsubs@colorado.edu informed of the proposal status and if it is funded or not.

    Active Internal Competitions

    https://www.packard.org/what-we-fund/conservation-and-science/science/pa...

    Packard is expected to release the 2017 guidelines in mid-December and applications are typically due to Packard in April. The information below is from last year’s cycle and will guide the internal campus competition process. The internal application link below details what documents are needed for the internal competition. Questions should be sent to Ryan Reeves at ltdsubs@colorado.edu.

    Deadlines and Internal Application

    Internal CU Deadline and Application Link: 11:59pm MST December 8, 2016

    https://cuboulderovcr.secure-platform.com/a/solicitations/home/3086

    Packard Deadline: TBD

    Program Summary

    Each year, the David and Lucile Packard Foundation invites the presidents of 50 universities to nominate two early-career professors each from their institutions in the following disciplines: physics, chemistry, mathematics, biology, astronomy, computer science, earth science, ocean science, and all branches of engineering. An Advisory Panel of distinguished scientists and engineers carefully reviews the nominations and selects 18 Fellows to receive individual grants of $875,000, distributed over five years.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Up to two nominations may be made by the University of Colorado Boulder.

    Funding Restrictions

    Recognizing that certain areas of contemporary science and engineering already have access to relatively generous funding (for example, clinical research, research associated with the design and construction of large national facilities such as accelerators and space stations, and applied research of direct relevance to national security), the Packard Fellowships are directed to other, less generously supported fields. The Fellowship Program provides support for highly creative researchers early in their careers; faculty members who are well-established and well‐funded are less likely to receive the award.

    https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/nsf15528/nsf15528.htm

    Program Summary

    Cultivating Cultures for Ethical STEM (CCE STEM) funds research projects that identify factors that are efficacious in the formation of ethical STEM researchers in all the fields of science and engineering that NSF supports. CCE STEM solicits proposals for research that explores the following: ‘What constitutes ethical STEM research and practice, and which cultural and institutional contexts promote ethical STEM research and practice and why?' Factors one might consider include: honor codes, professional ethics codes and licensing requirements, an ethic of service and/or service learning, life-long learning requirements, curricula or memberships in organizations (e.g. Engineers without Borders) that stress social responsibility and humanitarian goals, institutions that serve under-represented groups, institutions where academic and research integrity are cultivated at multiple levels, institutions that cultivate ethics across the curriculum, or programs that promote group work, or do not grade. Do certain labs have a ‘culture of academic integrity'? What practices contribute to the establishment and maintenance of ethical cultures and how can these practices be transferred, extended to, and integrated into other research and learning settings?

    Successful proposals typically have a comparative dimension, either between or within institutional settings that differ along these or other factors.

    CCE STEM research projects will use basic research to produce knowledge about what constitutes responsible or irresponsible, just or unjust scientific practices and sociotechnical systems, and how to best instill students with this knowledge.

    Proposals for awards from minority-serving institutions (e.g. Tribal Colleges and Universities, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Hispanic-Serving Institutions, Alaska Native or Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions), women's colleges, and institutions primarily serving persons with disabilities are strongly encouraged. Proposals including international collaborations are encouraged when those efforts enhance the merit of the proposed work by incorporating unique resources, expertise, facilities or sites of international partners. The U.S. team's international counterparts generally should have support or obtain funding through other sources.

    Deadlines

    Internal CU Deadline: 11:59pm MST December 12, 2016

    NSF Deadline: 5:00pm MST February 15, 2017

    Internal Application Requirements (all in PDF format)

    • 2-page project description
    • 1-page impact statement describing how the project will benefit CU Boulder
    • 1-page statement of work and team composition 
    • 1-page budget estimate and data management plan

    To access the online application, visit: https://cuboulderovcr.secure-platform.com/a/solicitations/home/3093

    Eligibility

    Proposals may only be submitted by the following:

    • Universities and Colleges - Universities and two- and four-year colleges (including community colleges) accredited in, and having a campus located in, the US acting on behalf of their faculty members. Such organizations also are referred to as academic institutions.
    • Non-profit, non-academic organizations: Independent museums, observatories, research labs, professional societies and similar organizations in the U.S. associated with educational or research activities.

    Who May Serve as PI:

    NSF expects project teams to include persons with appropriate expertise. This might include expertise in the domain or domains of science or engineering on which the project focuses, in ethics, values, evaluation, and pedagogy. For Institutional Transformation Research Grant proposals, it is highly recommended that one or more senior members of the administration (e.g. Provost, VP, and/or President) serves as a PI.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Only one proposal may be submitted by an eligible organization, as defined above, in which a member of their organization serves as the PI. Potential PIs are advised to contact their institutional office of research regarding processes used to select proposals for submission. Organizations submitting more than one proposal will be notified and given one week from notification to select one proposal for consideration. If one is not selected in that time period, all of those proposals will be returned without review. There is no limit on the number of proposals under which an organization may be included as a non-lead collaborator or sub-awardee.

    There are no restrictions or limits on the number of proposals per PI or co-PI.

    Award Information and Duration

    Estimated Number of Awards: 6 to 8

    Anticipated Funding Amount: $3,150,000

    Estimated total annual funding amount is $3,150,000 - subject to the availability of funds. The maximum amount for 5-year awards is $600,000 and the maximum amount for 3-year awards is $400,000. The average award is $275,000.

    http://www.honda.com/community/applying-for-a-grant

    Program Summary

    The American Honda Foundation engages in grant making that reflects the basic tenets, beliefs and philosophies of Honda companies, which are characterized by the following qualities: imaginative, creative, youthful, forward-thinking, scientific, humanistic and innovative. We support youth education with a specific focus on the STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) subjects in addition to the environment, job training and literacy. Our aim is to seek out those programs and organizations with a well-defined sense of purpose, demonstrated commitment to making the best use of available resources and a reputation for accomplishing their objectives. In addition, programs should be:

    • Innovative and creative that propose untried methods which ultimately may result in providing solutions to the complex educational concerns currently facing the American society.
    • Broad in scope, intent, impact and outreach.
    • Possess a high potential for success with a relatively low incidence of duplication of effort (i.e. other organizations administering the same programs).
    • Dedicated to improving the human condition of all mankind.
    • Operate from a position of financial and administrative soundness.
    • In urgent need of funding from a priority basis (not necessarily financial need); i.e., the relative importance of the program or project to the public.

    Deadlines

    Internal CU Deadline: 11:59pm MST December 12, 2016

    American Honda Foundation Deadline: February 1, 2017

    Internal Application Requirements

    Before developing or submitting your internal proposal, complete the eligibility questionnaire from the American Honda Foundation to ensure your project is eligible for funding.

    Internal application requirements include:

    • 2-page proposal describing activities planned (PDF format)
    • Budget narrative for the requested funds (PDF format)

    To access the online application, visit: https://cuboulderovcr.secure-platform.com/a/solicitations/home/3094

    Eligibility

    Nonprofit charitable organizations classified as a 501(c) (3) public charity by the Internal Revenue Service, or a public school district, private/public elementary and secondary schools as listed by the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) are eligible for funding.

    To be considered for funding organizations MUST have two years of audited financial statements examined by an independent CPA for the purpose of expressing an opinion if gross revenue is $500,000 or more. If gross revenue is less than $500,000, and the organization does not have audited financial statements, it may submit two years of financial statements accompanied by an independent CPA's review report instead.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    The University of Colorado Boulder is limited to one request in a 12-month period.

    Award Information and Duration

    The grant range is from $20,000 to $75,000 over a one-year period. Applicants requesting less than $20,000 will not be considered for funding and all requests exceeding the maximum amount of $75,000 will automatically be declined. The average size of AHF's grants is $45,000 for a one-year funding cycle. The Foundation's funding is awarded on a year to year basis and average 27 grants annually.

    There will be an informational workshop on November 30, 2016 from 12-2pm in UMC 247. Dr. Prashant Nagpal, a 2014 Keck grantee, will highlight how to succeed with Keck and attendees will have an opportunity to ask questions. Click here to RSVP. Lunch will be served.

    http://www.wmkeck.org/grant-programs/research

    Deadlines and Internal Application

    Internal CU Deadline and Application Link: 11:59pm MST January 5, 2017

    https://cuboulderovcr.secure-platform.com/a/solicitations/home/3087

    Keck Phase I Application Deadline: 5:30pm MST May 1, 2017

    Keck Full Proposal Deadline: 5:30pm MST August 15, 2017

    Program Summary

    The Research Program seeks to benefit humanity by supporting projects in two specific areas (1) medical research and (2) science and engineering, that are distinctive and novel in their approach, question the prevailing paradigm, or have the potential to break open new territory in their field. Past grants have been awarded to major universities, independent research institutions, and medical schools to support pioneering biological and physical science research and engineering, including the development of promising new technologies, instrumentation or methodologies.

    Funding is awarded to universities and institutions nationwide for projects in research that:

    • Focus on important and emerging areas of research
    • Have the potential to develop breakthrough technologies, instrumentation or methodologies
    • Are innovative, distinctive and interdisciplinary
    • Demonstrate a high level of risk due to unconventional approaches, or by challenging the prevailing paradigm
    • Have the potential for transformative impact, such as the founding of a new field of research, the enabling of observations not previously possible, or the altered perception of a previously intractable problem
    • Does not focus on clinical or translational research, treatment trials or research for the sole purpose of drug development
    • Fall outside the mission of public funding agencies
    • Demonstrate that private philanthropy generally, and the W. M. Keck Foundation in particular, is essential to the project’s success.

    Keck Foundation’s Limited Submission Guidelines

    One proposal per each category:

    1. Medical Research
    2. Science and Engineering

    Award Information

    Historically, grants range from $500,000 to $5 million, but are typically $1 million or less.

    Active Calls for Interest

    A call for interest is a simple statement via email indicating interest in applying to specific program. If there are multiple expressions of interest, an internal campus competition may be held with instructions for internal proposals to be sent out at a later time. If you are interested in a program below, please submit an expression of interest to Ryan Reeves at ltdsubs@colorado.edu.

    http://www.dreyfus.org/awards/camille_dreyfus_teacher_award.shtml

    Program Summary 

    The Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program supports the research and teaching careers of talented young faculty in the chemical sciences. Based on institutional nominations, the program provides discretionary funding to faculty at an early stage in their careers. Criteria for selection include an independent body of scholarship attained in the early years of their appointment (see below), and a demonstrated commitment to education, signaling the promise of continuing outstanding contributions to both research and teaching. The Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program provides an unrestricted research grant of $75,000.

    Deadlines

    Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: 11:59pm MST December 7, 2016

    Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation Deadline: February 10, 2017

    Eligibility

    The Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program is open to academic institutions in the States, Districts, and Territories of the United States of America that grant a bachelor's or higher degree in the chemical sciences, including biochemistry, materials chemistry, and chemical engineering. Nominees must hold a full-time tenure-track academic appointment, and are normally expected to have been appointed no earlier than mid-year 2011. Awardees are from Ph.D. granting departments in which scholarly research is a principal activity. Undergraduate education is an important component. Institutions may submit only one Camille Dreyfus nomination annually. Re-nominations are accepted.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Institutions may make only one nomination annually for the Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program.

    Award Information and Restrictions

    The Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award provides a $75,000 unrestricted research grant. Of the total amount, $7,500 is for departmental expenses associated with research and education. Charges associated with indirect costs or institutional overhead are not allowed. Defrayal of academic-year salary is not permitted. Funds are normally expended over a period of five years. Foundation approval is not required for budgetary changes after an award is made. If the awardee leaves the institution, the transfer of the remaining funds requires prior Foundation approval.

    https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2016/nsf16547/nsf16547.htm

    Program Summary

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) seeks to develop and nurture a national innovation ecosystem that builds upon research to guide the output of scientific discoveries closer to the development of technologies, products and processes that benefit society. In order to contribute to a national innovation ecosystem, NSF established the NSF Innovation Corps Sites Program (NSF I-Corps Sites). Sites are funded at academic institutions, having already existing innovation or entrepreneurial units, to enable them to:

    • Nurture students and/or faculty who are engaged in projects having the potential to be transitioned into the marketplace. I-Corps Sites will provide infrastructure, advice, resources, networking opportunities, training and modest funding to enable groups to transition their work into the marketplace or into becoming I-Corps Team applicants.
    • Develop formal, active, local innovation ecosystems that contribute to a larger, national network of mentors, researchers, entrepreneurs and investors. Networking is an essential component of all of NSF's I-Corps activities – local and national networking activities help advance the goals of I-Corps and contribute to local and national ecosystems for innovation.

    The purpose of an I-Corps Site is to nurture and support multiple, local teams to transition their ideas, devices, processes or other intellectual activities into the marketplace.

    Deadlines

    Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: 11:59pm MST December 14, 2016

    NSF Deadline: 5:00pm MST February 9, 2017

    Eligibility

    Proposals may only be submitted by the following:

    • Universities and Colleges - Universities and two- and four-year colleges (including community colleges) accredited in, and having a campus located in, the US acting on behalf of their faculty members. Such organizations also are referred to as academic institutions.
    • A competitive proposal for an I-Corps Site will be led by an institution having an already existing unit whose goal is to assist faculty, students and other academic personnel to engage in entrepreneurial activities and transition scientific and technological innovations. Such units are typically called: innovation centers, entrepreneurial centers, technology incubators, etc. Their mission is to provide resources to individuals and teams in the form of space, seed funding, entrepreneurial mentoring, curriculum, or other assets needed to transition technology into the marketplace.
    • Collaborative proposals from multiple institutions are discouraged. Exceptions can be made, with the approval of the NSF I-Corps Management Team, for institutions that have collaborative entrepreneurial centers already in place. I-Corps Sites are awarded to single institutions and Sites fund teams from their own institution. In exceptional cases, a Site may also fund teams from branch campuses or other institutions in the Site's geographical region. However, a Site must obtain permission from a cognizant program officer before proposing this model.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Limit on Number of Proposals per Organization: 1

    Limit on Number of Proposals per PI or Co-PI: 1

    Award Information

    Estimated Number of Awards: 15 to 25

    Up to 25 I-Corps Sites awards annually, pending availability of funds.

    Anticipated Funding Amount: $2,500,000 for Type I and Type II Sites

    https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17522/nsf17522.htm

    Program Summary

    Inclusion across the Nation of Communities of Learners of Underrepresented Discoverers in Engineering and Science (NSF INCLUDES) is a comprehensive national initiative designed to enhance U.S. leadership in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) discoveries and innovations focused on NSF's commitment to diversity, inclusion, and broadening participation in these fields. NSF INCLUDES supports efforts to create networked relationships among organizations whose goals include developing talent from all sectors of society to build the STEM workforce. This initiative seeks to improve collaborative efforts aimed at enhancing the preparation, increasing the participation, and ensuring the contributions of individuals from groups that have traditionally been underrepresented and underserved in the STEM enterprise: women, persons with disabilities, African Americans/Blacks, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, Native Pacific Islanders, and persons from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. Significant advancement in the inclusion of these groups will result in a new generation of STEM talent and leadership to secure our nation’s future and long-term economic competitiveness.

    The grand challenge of broadening participation in STEM is to transform the STEM enterprise at all levels in order to fully engage the nation’s talent for the ultimate improvement of the STEM enterprise. As a comprehensive national initiative, NSF INCLUDES aims to address the various complex equity and inclusion-related challenges and opportunities that characterize the nation’s cultural and linguistic diversity, with a specific emphasis on the aforementioned groups. The goal is to achieve impact at the national level. Viewing inclusion as an asset and opportunity for social innovation, NSF is particularly interested in using approaches to scaling and growth, such as collective impact, networked improvement communities, and strategic partnerships. The objective is to develop networks that involve representative organizations and consortia from different sectors that are committed to a common agenda that comprehensively solves a specific STEM-inclusion problem. The long-term goal of NSF INCLUDES is to support innovative models, networks, partnerships, technical capabilities and research that will enable the U.S. science and engineering workforce to thrive by ensuring that traditionally underrepresented and underserved groups are represented in percentages comparable to their representation in the U.S. population. Researchers and practitioners at minority serving institutions are strongly encouraged to participate in this activity given their experience and expertise in broadening participation.

    NSF INCLUDES is a multi-year program with three essential components currently under development:

    • NSF INCLUDES Design and Development Launch Pilots: Two-year pilot projects that explore the feasibility of bold, innovative ways for solving a broadening participation challenge in STEM. Successful pilots will deliver models or prototypes, which incorporate data and measurement infrastructures, supporting collective efforts aimed at increasing the active participation of those who have been traditionally underserved and underrepresented in all STEM fields.
    • NSF INCLUDES Alliances: NSF INCLUDES Alliances will leverage existing Design and Development Launch Pilots, programs, people, organizations, technologies, and institutions to catalyze NSF’s broadening participation investments, with each Alliance committed to collectively solving a specific set of objectives.
    • NSF INCLUDES Backbone Organization: The Backbone Organization will drive the following activities for all NSF INCLUDES Alliances over the lifecycle of the initiative: (a) providing a guiding vision and strategy; (b) developing a collaborative infrastructure to align NSF INCLUDES activities; (c) establishing shared models, measurement practices, and evaluation criteria; (d) building public will; (e) advancing policy; and (f) mobilizing funding.

    Deadlines

    Internal Expression of Interest Deadline: 11:59pm MST December 14, 2016

    NSF Deadline: 5:00pm MST February 14, 2017

    Eligibility

    The categories of proposers eligible to submit proposals to the National Science Foundation are identified in the Grant Proposal Guide, Chapter I, Section E.

    Submission of a preliminary proposal is required for Design and Development Launch Pilots. Full Design and Development Launch Pilot proposals may be submitted by invitation only after the review of the preliminary proposal is completed.

    Proposals should include diverse teams of stakeholders and justify the role of each partner. Partnering institutions may include academic institutions, professional organizations, businesses, industry groups, government organizations, non-profit companies, community-based organizations, and science or industry-focused organizations. Institutions should show high levels of institutional commitment and support.

    Limited Submission Guidelines

    Limit on Number of Proposals per Organization: 1

    An organization may serve as the lead institution on only one Design and Development Launch Pilot preliminary or full proposal, although it may serve as a collaborating partner on other proposals.

    Limit on Number of Proposals per PI or Co-PI: 2

    An individual may serve as a PI or Co-PI on only two (2) Design and Development Launch Pilot preliminary or full proposals.

    Award Information and Duration

    Number of awards: up to 25

    Project duration: Two years

    Award size: Up to $300,000

    Grant Administration: Design and Development Launch Pilot projects will be managed by NSF as standard grants