Friday Forum & Workshops

GTP logoGraduate Teacher Program Friday Forum & Workshop Series
All workshops count toward GTP certificate requirements.
All graduate students, undergraduate teaching & learning assistants, postdoctoral fellows, faculty, and staff are welcome at GTP events and activities.
For further information, please call 303-492-4902.

Friday Forum Workshop Archives

Fall:  2014,   2013,  20122011

Spring:  2014,  20132012,   20112010

Fridays 11:00-Noon, ATLAS 200

Focus on the Humanities

Follow us on Twitter for future workshop details coming this Fall 2014

Fall 2014 Schedule

September 19 Workshop: "Teaching Contentious Topics"

Anthony Kelley, Doctoral Candidate, Philosophy

Contentious topics are those that are likely to cause conflict or otherwise create an unhealthy and unproductive learning environment. This workshop will train educators to better anticipate and to better respond to the challenges faced when teaching such topics to create a more viable and sustainable community of learners.

September 26 Faculty Forum: "What's Research Got To Do With It?"

Greg Johnson, Professor, Religious Studies

Professor Johnson discusses how to incorporate unfolding research experiences and findings in large undergraduate classes, (1) to motivate students about topics at hand through providing on-the-ground accounts of real-time issues and (2) through using research findings and publications to push students to engage issues at the highest possible level of detail and theory. Johnson will argue that teachers can connect with and lead students to exciting insights while also gaining from the experience in a research capacity by means of students' frequently profound and often unexpected insights.

October 3 Faculty Forum: "Understanding Art & Literature from a Cross Cultural Perspective is Foundational to Critical Thinking"

Claire Farago, Professor, Art & Art History

Professor Farago discusses how and why she developed an introductory course in art history that focuses on cultural exchange to introduce students to the role of art in society. Her presentation raises the issue of why the arts and humanities are important to a liberal arts education and will help graduates land jobs and further their education, no matter what field of study or careers they pursue. Come join the discussion and conversation.

October 10 Faculty Forum: "Aesthetics of Flow Visualization: Art in Engineering"

Jean Hertzberg, Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering

Flow visualization contributes strong messages of science content within the community of fluid dynamicists, but outside such a specialized community, the aesthetics of fluid flows carries the most weight. As I present examples of four aesthetics – beauty, power, destruction, and oddness – each is illustrated with examples drawn from flow visualizations from both the Flow Visualization course (MCEN 4151) and sources on the web.

October 17 Faculty Forum: "Education in 'Root Fields'—the Benefits of Humane Learning in a Scientological World"

Noel Lenski, Professor, Classics

Professor Lenski will explore the ongoing importance of the study of humanities and the arts in a world that has become obsessed with science and technology. He will focus on three primary areas: the ongoing importance of language learning and language use in a world that is and will remain linguistically mediated; the importance of a connection to shared culture and shared methods of cultural understanding for human fulfillment; and the ongoing superiority of humanistic learning and research as a hermeneutic tool for success in our society.

October 24 Workshop: "Writing an Effective Teaching Portfolio in the Humanities"

Laura L. B. Border, Director, Graduate Teacher Program

When you write your portfolio what should you take into account? Style, format, evidence? How can your portfolio stand out from others? This workshop is for humanists who are on the job market.

November 7 Faculty Forum: "Lessons for Life Through Art"

George Rivera, Associate Professor, Art & Art History

Presentation is about how art reflects life and what we might learn from it, especially for those who will join academia.