Jackson Barnett is the editor-in-chief of CU Independent, CU’s student newspaper. He studies Asian studies, with a minor in Hindi and Urdu. He has studied abroad in India, Hong Kong and on a Semester at Sea. His independent travels and freelance work have taken him from North Dakota to India. He currently interns for Threshold, an environmental podcast and radio show, He also covers social issues in Colorado, including addiction, race and social justice. He hopes to put his Urdu to use by reporting on international politics and climate change in South Asia. His work has appeared in CU Independent, Westword, Off Assignment, Colorado Daily and the Denver Post “Hey Reverb! section.

"Balloon" by Jackson Barnett Balloon  – “Outside the tin-roof school room a young boy, who did not have the means to attend school, played with a balloon while I was photographing. I knew the thin-armed boy and asked to take some photos of him; the resulting image captures the hope of him, and so many other children in India, to reach for more despite considerable challenges.”

"Best Dress" by Jackson Barnett Best Dress  – “In-between working on freelance assignments in the slums of Delhi, I found that the children who lived there would line up to have their photo taken. Many would put on the few clothes they had and form a long, pushy line. This young girl not only put on her best dress, she put on her best smile.”

"Cleaning" by Jackson BarnettCleaning was taken after the second day of cleaning my house on the Hill. When I first opened the door, the house that would become my home for the semester looked like a ‘flop house.’ There was more dirt inside, on the walls and even on the ceiling than on my scrap of grass-less front yard. On my hands and knees I scrubbed every inch of that house, and the dirt running off my sponge after washing it in my sink was too interesting of a scene not to take a photograph of.”

"Flipping Over Trash" by Jackson Barnett Flipping Over Trash  – “A small non-governmental organization (NGO) runs dance classes in the Masoodpur Slum. Young people are given the opportunity to learn how to flip, dance and shake. Many of the images made of poverty revolve around the photographer's preconceived notion of abject sadness. While poverty is an oppressive, and for many inescapable, state, there are still moments of joy. This community found many of those moments through dance.”

 

 

 

 

 

See more of Jackson’s work at Jackson-Barnett.com
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