People protesting in Washington, D.C.

Editor’s choice podcast remix: Our best on politics, concussions and impeachment

Nov. 13, 2019

We’re going on a break. On this episode of the Brainwaves podcast, we take a look back at interviews we’ve done on politics, concussions and impeachment. We plan to be back early next year with fresh, big ideas!

Sens. Orrin Hatch, left, and Chuck Grassley, right, seen during a U.S. Senate hearing.

In congressional hearings, some are more equal than others

Nov. 12, 2019

An analysis by CU Boulder linguist Chase Raymond and others has found that U.S. Senate chairpersons can add bias to hearings through how much they speak during hearings.

Capitol building

Shifting political sands: What we can learn from swing states, history and a diverse candidate field

Nov. 6, 2019

What do changing demographics look like for swing states in 2020? How about candidate demographics? We’ll take a look at that, and a look back at the history of impeachment, in this episode of the Brainwaves podcast.

Stock image of Telluride

For better US foreign policy, report looks to Colorado’s middle class

Nov. 5, 2019

U.S. foreign policy professionals should pay more attention to income inequality and rising costs for housing and childcare in states like Colorado, according to a new Carnegie Endowment for International Peace report prepared in part by the Leeds School of Business.

Shot of someone's hands using a mobile phone

Colorado voters signal support for sports betting, impeachment, CU Boulder survey finds

Nov. 3, 2019

You can expect sports betting to become legal and taxable in Colorado, but the jury is still out on a push at the ballot box this week to overturn the Taxpayer Bill of Rights (TABOR) Amendment, according to this year's Colorado Political Climate Survey.

Supreme Court building

New book examines powers, limits of government speech

Oct. 29, 2019

Government speech—the term elicits concerns of the government regulating our expression, but what about the constitutional issues raised when the government itself is doing the talking?

U.S. Passports

More than 700,000 citizenship applications backlogged as application wait times double, report finds

Sept. 13, 2019

People applying for U.S. citizenship have seen application wait times double since 2016, according to a new report prepared in part by University of Colorado Law School faculty and students.

White House

How Nixon's resignation changed us: Impeachment 45 years later

July 30, 2019

On this episode of the Brainwaves podcast, what were some of the long-term impacts of Nixon's resignation, did America ever truly heal, and given the state of politics, could Congress ever carry out impeachment in a bipartisan way ever again?

Photo of Colorado Law's Wolf Law building

Netflix docuseries 'When They See Us' shines international spotlight on Colorado Law’s Korey Wise Innocence Project

July 1, 2019

The Korey Wise Innocence Project at Colorado Law has seen a dramatic uptick in international attention since the May 31 release of Ava DuVernay’s Netflix docuseries "When They See Us," based on the wrongful convictions of five teenagers who became known as the "Central Park Five."

Flag on side of barn

Election 2020: Fake news, Russian trolling and primary chaos

May 15, 2019

In this week’s Brainwaves podcast, we look at the new rules for how the Democratic nominee is chosen, concerns about Russian interference and fake news.

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