A pregnant woman with a flower in her hand

Prenatal exposure to ‘good bacteria’ prevents autism-like syndrome

May 27, 2020

Inoculating mothers with a beneficial microbe during the equivalent of the third trimester of pregnancy prevents an autism-like disorder in their offspring, according to a new study. The paper suggests that exposure to good bacteria during pregnancy may positively impact brain development.

Construction workers

'Nature’s antifreeze' provides formula for more durable concrete

May 27, 2020

CU Boulder researchers have discovered that a synthetic molecule based on natural antifreeze proteins minimizes freeze-thaw damage and increases the strength and durability of concrete, improving the longevity of new infrastructure and decreasing carbon emissions over its lifetime.

A brain image on a screen

$11 million, 7-year NIH grant to help unravel mysteries of the teen brain

May 20, 2020

The National Institutes of Health has awarded CU Boulder $11 million to continue a study measuring how drugs, screens, concussions and more impact development, offering insight into why teenagers do the things they do.

voles and their babies

We’re hard-wired for longing, new study suggests

May 11, 2020

A new brain imaging study of prairie voles—which are among only about 5% of mammalian species besides humans who are monogamous—found that when it comes to forming bonds, longing may be as important as being together. The study also sheds light on why it's so hard to social distance, and could lead to new therapies for conditions like autism and depression.

Graduate student Marina Nieto Caballero and visiting virology scholar Eddie Fuques Villalba, preparing to assess the infection potential of murine Coronavirus in CU Boulder SEEL-based environmental engineering laboratory.

Environmental engineering researchers study airborne coronavirus disinfection

May 8, 2020

Professor Mark Hernandez’s team will be testing how well common air disinfectants—including the “foggers” that spray peroxides, chlorine derivatives and surfactants—work against viruses closely related to COVID-19.

Mosquito biting a person.

Scientists develop tool to improve disease model accuracy

May 5, 2020

What can researchers do when their mathematical models of the spread of infectious diseases don’t match real-world data?

The ATLAS Building

ATLAS research helps define the future of human-computer interaction

May 4, 2020

At a time when the field of human-computer interaction is becoming more important than ever, ATLAS researchers are making substantial contributions, recently contributing nine papers and two workshops to the world's leading conference for HCI.

Obama signing the affordable care act

Affordable Care Act lived up to promise of buffering bankruptcy risk, study shows

April 30, 2020

A decade after President Barack Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, more people are fully insured, fewer are uninsured and people who lose their insurance intermittently are no longer at greater risk of bankruptcy, according to a new CU Boulder study.

An image showing the Freezer Refrigerator Incubator Device for Galley and Experimentation, or FRIDGE

New FRIDGE could bring real ice cream to space

April 28, 2020

Astronaut ice cream—the crunchy, freeze-dried, pale imitation of the real thing—may have met its match: The International Space Station is getting a real freezer.

A hiker walks past one site of the Great Unconformity near the town of Manitou Springs, Colorado.

Geologists work to piece together Earth’s missing memories

April 27, 2020

A team of geologists is digging into what may be Earth’s most famous case of geologic amnesia.

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