Researchers drilling into Alaskan permafrost

Alaska is getting wetter; that’s bad news for permafrost and the climate

July 31, 2020

Alaska is getting wetter. A new study spells out what that means for the permafrost that underlies about 85 percent of the state, and the consequences for Earth’s global climate.

ATLAS graduate student Fiona Bell

ATLAS graduate student assists Accenture Labs with development of self-cleaning textiles

July 31, 2020

Imagine a textile that cleans itself, killing viruses and bacteria and dissolving flecks of embedded organic material. Such a fabric could transform the safety of seating in planes, buses and other public spaces—a particularly appealing prospect in current times.

National Snow and Ice Data Center director Mark Serreze conducted research on the St. Patrick Bay ice caps as a graduate student with the University of Massachusetts in 1982. (Photo credit: Ray Bradley)

Canadian ice caps disappear, confirming 2017 scientific prediction

July 29, 2020

The St. Patrick Bay ice caps on the Hazen Plateau of northeastern Ellesmere Island in Nunavut, Canada, have completely disappeared, according to NASA satellite imagery.

A stock image of a neon sign that says "Code of Ethical Behavior"

New study shows brands advertising with more moral reasoning

July 22, 2020

Consumers are demanding that companies act more ethically. The good news: a new study shows moral reasoning is on the rise among advertising pros.

A component in an extreme ultraviolet laser.

Scientists open new window into the nanoworld

July 15, 2020

Physicists at JILA achieve new feats of wafer-thinness in a study published this week.

Woman sits in an airport while wearing a mask.

Experts weigh in on airborne transmission of COVID-19

July 9, 2020

After 239 scientists signed on to a letter arguing that the coronavirus can go airborne, the World Health Organization updated its public health guidelines.

A graphic showing the orbits of dark, icy bodies that tilt out of the plane of the solar system

The collective power of the solar system’s dark, icy bodies

July 7, 2020

Two new studies by researchers at CU Boulder may help to solve one of space’s biggest mysteries: why the solar system’s “detached objects” don’t circle the sun the way they should.

Reddit logo cracking down the middle

As the coronavirus spread, 2 social media communities drifted apart

July 2, 2020

Researchers are exploring the tale of two online communities and their response to COVID-19: the r/Coronavirus and r/China_flu discussion boards on the social media site Reddit.

Ancestral cliff dwellings

Ancient societies hold lessons for modern cities

June 19, 2020

Today’s modern cities, from Denver to Dubai, could learn a thing or two from the ancestral Pueblo communities that once stretched across the southwestern United States. For starters, the more people live together, the better the living standards.

Sona Dimidjian of CU Boulder’s Renée Crown Wellness Institute and C. Neill Epperson of the Department of Psychiatry at CU Anschutz.

CU Boulder researchers contributing to CU Anschutz podcasts starting June 30

June 19, 2020

Starting on June 30, five CU Boulder researchers will be featured in the University of Colorado Anschutz-led Mind the Brain podcast series.

Pages