A researcher spits in a tube

Frequent, rapid testing could turn national COVID-19 tide within weeks

Nov. 20, 2020

New research shows that broad, national dissemination of frequent, rapid COVID-19 tests could turn the tide on the pandemic within weeks, without shutting down schools and businesses. For curbing infection, test turnaround time is more important than test sensitivity.

An image of a microscope

Researchers scale up tiny actuator inspired by muscle

Nov. 18, 2020

New research may one day enable soft machines to fully integrate with our bodies to deliver drugs, target tumors, or repair aging or dysfunctional tissue.

Two boys on their smartphones

Parental restrictions on childhood tech use have few lasting effects

Nov. 17, 2020

New research shows parental restrictions have few lasting effects on a child's tech use in young adulthood. Also, college students use more tech than they ever have in their lives or ever want to again.

Bike lanes

How the COVID-19 pandemic can reshape our streets and relationship to cars

Nov. 17, 2020

In the spring of 2020, once-busy streets became quiet and empty. In many cities, pedestrians and bicycles filled city streets instead of cars. What could this mean for the future of our cities and transportation systems?

Breast cancer cells as seen under a microscope.

New insights on a common protein could lead to novel cancer treatments

Nov. 4, 2020

Findings could lead to new therapies for hard-to-treat cancers and even neurological diseases and rare developmental disorders.

Blake Leeper

Court ruling barring ‘blade runner’ from Olympics is scientifically unfounded, studies suggest

Oct. 28, 2020

The highest court in sports ruled that Blake Leeper cannot compete in the Olympic Games in Tokyo because his prostheses give him a competitive advantage. CU Boulder studies suggest otherwise, and the researchers who conducted those studies say the ruling is discriminatory.

Acousto Thermal Shift Assay devices being assembled

New technology diagnoses sickle cell disease in record time

Oct. 19, 2020

Diseases of the blood, like sickle cell disease, have traditionally taken at least a full day, tedious lab work and expensive equipment to diagnose, but researchers have developed a way to diagnose these conditions with greater precision in only one minute.

Ed Chuong with a student

Remnants of ancient viruses could be shaping coronavirus response, says new Packard Fellow

Oct. 15, 2020

Ed Chuong, an assistant professor in the Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, has been awarded a prestigious $875,000 Packard Fellowship to study how remnants of ancient viruses shape modern-day immune response.

Family in a park

Children heavily influenced by time in nature, social and emotional support

Oct. 1, 2020

CU Boulder Today spoke with Louise Chawla about how children are happier and more likely to protect the natural world when they have a greater connection to it, and the important role of social and emotional support from parents, peers and community in creating hope around issues like climate change.

Daniela Vergara

Cannabis data lacking, but machine learning could help fill the gap

Sept. 28, 2020

An array of little-known chemicals present in marijuana can interact to influence the taste, smell and effect of each unique strain. But, according to new research, the cannabis industry seldom tests for those compounds and knows little about them.

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