Pointed tool made from elephant bones seen from both sides

Ancient humans turned elephant remains into a surprising array of bone tools

Aug. 30, 2021

Humans living about 400,000 years ago produced an unprecedented diversity of elephant bone tools, including pointed tools for carving meat and wedge-shaped tools for cracking open large femurs and other long bones.

An aerial image of Norlin Quad

2 professors tapped to give Distinguished Research Lectures

Aug. 30, 2021

Rebecca Maloy of the School of Music and Roy Parker of Biochemistry and the BioFrontiers Institute have been selected to receive 2021-22 Distinguished Research Lectureships.

Women of Afghanistan stand outside the U.S. Embassy in Kabul, Wednesday, March 1, 2006. President George W. Bush and Laura Bush made a surprise visit to the city and presided over a ceremonial ribbon-cutting at the embassy. (Staff Sgt. Russell Lee Klika, US Army National Guard; Source: Wikimedia Commons)

What the pullout of U.S. troops from Afghanistan means for the nation’s women

Aug. 19, 2021

Geography professor Jennifer Fluri discusses what has changed for women in Afghanistan in the past 20 years and what’s at stake for women's education, as well as women's roles in politics, public life and the economy in light of current events.

A collage of diverse women

The 'shecession': How the pandemic is impacting women’s careers

Aug. 18, 2021

Some fear the effects of the pandemic could have lasting impacts on everything from homeownership to wealth accumulation for women. They could even affect the kinds of people who end up in boardrooms and the scientific discoveries that are made in years to come.

An illustration of a lullaby

Colorado Lullaby Project bridges mental health, parenting

Aug. 6, 2021

Under a project started in 2020, CU music students help parents write music, while the Reneé Crown Wellness Institute studies the effects of the lullabies on the parents’ mental health, wellness and social connections.

A person receiving a COVID-19 vaccination at SEEC

7 common questions about the delta variant: What the research says

Aug. 5, 2021

Experts answer your questions about the delta variant of the coronavirus—from whether vaccines lose their efficacy over time to how common breakthrough cases are among the vaccinated.

A person using a spray paint can

Particles from paints, pesticides can have deadly impact

July 30, 2021

Air pollution triggered by use of common chemicals and fuels may kill 10 times more people than previously recognized.

A clock

A blood test for your body clock? It’s on the horizon

July 27, 2021

CU Boulder sleep researchers have found it's possible to determine the timing of a person's internal biological clock via a single blood draw. Ultimately, the findings could lead to personalized recommendations for when people should eat, sleep, exercise and take medications.

A mobile COVID-19 vaccination bus parks at the Williams Village residence complex at CU Boulder

As delta variant threatens Colorado, vaccines can stop its spread

July 26, 2021

A new variant of the virus that causes COVID-19 is now behind nearly 90% of the cases in the state. Researchers from CU Boulder talk about this new player in the pandemic and whether vaccinated people should continue to wear masks in public.

Hyena licking her cub

Early-life social connections influence gene expression, stress resilience

July 22, 2021

Having friends may not only be good for the health of your social life, but also for your actual health—if you’re a hyena, that is. Strong social connections and greater maternal care early in life can influence molecular markers and future stress response, researchers found.

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