Bacteria under the microscope

We're not so different: Bacterial weapons could help fight human diseases

Feb. 8, 2023

A new study in the journal Nature reveals that bacteria and people share the same core machinery for fighting off viruses and sheds light on how that ancient machinery works. The discovery could lead to novel treatments for human diseases, much like the gene-editing tool CRISPR— also modeled after a bacterial weapon —has.

Holocaust memorial site marked with a Jewish star

Holocaust Remembrance Day: How trauma persists

Jan. 26, 2023

Seventy-eight years ago on Jan. 27, the Auschwitz concentration camp closed after liberation by the Soviet army. Professor Janet Jacobs, who researches genocide, trauma and collective memory, discusses the ways in which the experiences and trauma of Holocaust survivors are passed down through generations.

Image of a brain in multiple colorshttps://www.colorado.edu/today/node/50032/edit?content_lock_token=UPQnzvYtDrbPs5NIUro83GgtRdpkPatWbrZ50U1TyZo#

CU research team moves one step closer to printing models of life-like 3D organs

Jan. 26, 2023

A model of your very own kidney made entirely from soft and pliable polymers? Researchers at two CU campuses are on the cusp of 3D printing realistic replicas of human anatomy.

Cannabis

‘Gateway drug’ no more: Study shows legalizing recreational cannabis does not increase substance abuse

Jan. 24, 2023

Legalizing recreational cannabis does not increase substance use disorders or use of other illicit drugs in adults and may reduce alcohol-related problems, according to new research. The study also found no link between cannabis legalization and increases in cognitive, psychological, social, relationship or financial problems.

A pregnant belly

Prenatal pollution exposure linked to lower cognitive scores in early life

Jan. 24, 2023

Toddlers whose moms were exposed to higher levels of air pollution during mid- to late-pregnancy tend to score lower on measures of cognition, motor coordination and language skills, according to new CU Boulder research.

A gavel in the courtroom

1 in 10 minors seeking abortions must pursue court approval, many are denied

Jan. 13, 2023

Twenty-two states, including Colorado, that have not banned abortion still do require minors to involve their parents before terminating a pregnancy—or take their case to the courts via judicial bypass. New research sheds light on how often teens choose judicial bypass and how often they are denied.

Professor Jill Litt checks on a plant with colleagues Evan Coringrato, Erin Decker and Angel Villalobos

The scientific reasons you should resolve to start gardening in 2023

Jan. 5, 2023

The first-ever randomized controlled trial of community gardening shows it boosts fiber intake and physical activity while decreasing stress and anxiety. It could even reduce risk of cancer and chronic illness. And that’s all in the first season of getting your hands dirty.

Researchers conduct water sampling.

Ongoing CU research explores impacts, solutions after Marshall Fire

Dec. 21, 2022

The Marshall Fire spurred researchers—many of them personally affected by the fire—to pivot and apply their expertise to the aftermath. One year later, dozens of ongoing research projects continue to explore the science behind what happened that day, the widespread impacts on people, pets and the environment and how we can mitigate future catastrophes amid a changing climate.

A cat

‘To save our pets, we need to know our neighbors.’ Lessons from the Marshall Fire

Dec. 21, 2022

A new CU Boulder study estimates more than 1,000 house pets perished in the Marshall Fire. With the one-year anniversary approaching, the study authors encourage guardians to have a pet evacuation plan in place. They're also helping to develop a new pet rescue app.

Graduates toss their caps in the air

Access to IUDs, other long-acting contraception boosts college graduation rates

Dec. 15, 2022

Women with easier access to the full range of contraceptive methods, including intrauterine devices and implants, are as much as 12% more likely to obtain a four-year college degree than those with more limited access, according to new research. The study comes amid growing concerns that access to certain forms of contraception is under threat in some areas of the country.

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