Acousto Thermal Shift Assay devices being assembled

New technology diagnoses sickle cell disease in record time

Oct. 19, 2020

Diseases of the blood, like sickle cell disease, have traditionally taken at least a full day, tedious lab work and expensive equipment to diagnose, but researchers have developed a way to diagnose these conditions with greater precision in only one minute.

Ed Chuong with a student

Remnants of ancient viruses could be shaping coronavirus response, says new Packard Fellow

Oct. 15, 2020

Ed Chuong, an assistant professor in the Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, has been awarded a prestigious $875,000 Packard Fellowship to study how remnants of ancient viruses shape modern-day immune response.

Women discussing the Colorado Theatre Standards

Now showing: New guidelines to ensure safety of theater performers

Oct. 9, 2020

Two CU Boulder theater professors created guidelines for dealing with conflicts, reporting sexual harassment, handling violence and stage intimacy and maintaining basic health and safety for all artists.

The town of Yanhuitlan with ancient mountaintop city of Cerro Jazmin in background (Oaxaca Highlands)

Scholars aim to unlock mystery of the Mesoamerican collapse

Oct. 8, 2020

A global team of researchers led by a CU Boulder professor has received a $1.5 million National Science Foundation grant to study the classic-period collapse in Mesoamerica.

Tom cech and Jennifer doudna

Former CU Boulder postdoc Jennifer Doudna smashes glass ceiling with historic Nobel win

Oct. 7, 2020

Thirty years after beginning her training as a postdoctoral scholar in the CU Boulder lab of Nobel laureate Thomas Cech, biochemist Jennifer Doudna won her own Nobel Prize for Chemistry for the co-development of the revolutionary genome-editing tool CRISPR-Cas9.

Family in a park

Children heavily influenced by time in nature, social and emotional support

Oct. 1, 2020

CU Boulder Today spoke with Louise Chawla about how children are happier and more likely to protect the natural world when they have a greater connection to it, and the important role of social and emotional support from parents, peers and community in creating hope around issues like climate change.

Daniela Vergara

Cannabis data lacking, but machine learning could help fill the gap

Sept. 28, 2020

An array of little-known chemicals present in marijuana can interact to influence the taste, smell and effect of each unique strain. But, according to new research, the cannabis industry seldom tests for those compounds and knows little about them.

An illustration of a puppet reacting to fake news

The truth about fake news

Sept. 25, 2020

A trio of researchers at the College of Media, Communication and Information have spent several years trying to unravel who shares fake news, what makes people click on it and what we can do about it.

An intestinal organoid

Microscopic scaffolding gives lab cells structure, then disappears under UV light

Sept. 18, 2020

Max Yavitt, a graduate student in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, is the first author on a new paper in advanced materials focusing on organoid development.

Choral performance

Singing unmasked, indoors spreads COVID-19 through aerosols, new study confirms

Sept. 17, 2020

Singing indoors, unmasked, can swiftly spread COVID-19 via microscopic airborne particles known as aerosols, confirms a new peer-reviewed study of a March choir rehearsal that became one of the nation’s first superspreading events.

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