Four CU-Boulder faculty members elected American Geophysical Union Fellows in 2012

Feb. 29, 2012

Four University of Colorado Boulder faculty members have been elected American Geophysical Union Fellows for 2012, the most from any institution in the world.

Two CU-Boulder faculty win National Science Foundation CAREER Awards

Feb. 16, 2012

Two University of Colorado Boulder faculty members, both from the ecology and evolutionary biology department, have received prestigious National Science Foundation Early Career Development, or CAREER, awards. The awards, which went to assistant professors Pieter Johnson and Rebecca Safran, are made to outstanding faculty in the early stages of their careers who effectively integrate innovative research and educational outreach.

CU-Boulder professor elected to National Academy of Engineering

Feb. 9, 2012

Diane McKnight, professor of civil, environmental and architectural engineering and a fellow of the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research at the University of Colorado Boulder, has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering. McKnight is among 66 new members and 10 foreign associates of the academy announced today. She joins 16 other faculty from the campus who have been elected since the academy’s formation in 1962.

CU-Boulder study shows global glaciers, ice caps shedding billions of tons of mass annually

Feb. 8, 2012

Earth’s glaciers and ice caps outside of the regions of Greenland and Antarctica are shedding roughly 150 billion tons of ice annually, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder.

New CU-led study may answer long-standing questions about enigmatic Little Ice Age

Jan. 30, 2012

A new University of Colorado Boulder-led study appears to answer contentious questions about the onset and cause of Earth’s Little Ice Age, a period of cooling temperatures that began after the Middle Ages and lasted into the late 19th century.

CU-Boulder-led team to assess decline of Arctic sea ice in Alaska's Beaufort Sea

Jan. 25, 2012

A national research team led by the University of Colorado Boulder is embarking on a two-year, multi-pronged effort to better understand the impacts of environmental factors associated with the continuing decline of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean.

CU wins EPA challenge to divert most gameday garbage from landfills

Jan. 12, 2012

The University of Colorado Boulder topped two leader boards in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s 2011 Game Day Challenge -- a national competition to eliminate waste generated at college football games. CU won the 48-school “Diversion Rate” and 17-school “Organics Reduction” categories in the EPA’s NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision contest.

Some earthquakes expected along Rio Grande Rift in Colorado and New Mexico, new study says

Jan. 11, 2012

The Rio Grande Rift, a thinning and stretching of Earth’s surface that extends from Colorado’s central Rocky Mountains to Mexico, is not dead but geologically alive and active, according to a new study involving scientists from the University of Colorado Boulder’s Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences.

Study indicates hail may disappear from Colorado's Front Range by 2070

Jan. 9, 2012

Summertime hail could all but disappear from the eastern flank of Colorado’s Rocky Mountains by 2070, says a new study by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the University of Colorado Boulder’s Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences and the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

50-million-year-old cricket and katydid fossils from Colorado hint at origin of insect hearing

Jan. 3, 2012

How did insects get their hearing? A new study of 50-million-year-old cricket and katydid fossils sporting some of the best preserved fossil insect ears described to date are helping to trace the evolution of the insect ear. According to paleontologist Dena Smith of the University of Colorado Boulder's Museum of Natural History and University of Illinois Professor Roy Plotnick, who collaborated on the new study at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center, or NESCent, in Durham, N.C., insects hear with help from some very unusual ears.

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