ALL Classics classes (but no Independent Studies) satisfy the College of Arts and Sciences’ Gen Ed Arts and Humanities distribution requirement. Further College requirements satisfied by individuals courses are noted in the description of the course in question.

CLAS 1010 (3). The Study of Words.
Study of English words of Latin and Greek origin, focusing on etymological meaning by analysis of component parts (prefixes, bases, suffixes) and on the ways in which words have changed and developed semantically. All texts are read in English translation. Equivalent to LING 1010 (duplicate degree credit not granted). This course further satisfies the College of Arts & Sciences’ Gen Ed Social Sciences distribution requirement.

CLAS 1020 (3). Argument from Evidence: Critical Writing about the Ancient World.
Introduces students to writing about the ancient world, with special attention to the possibilities and the limitations of ancient source-material. Taught as a writing workshop, with emphasis on critical thinking, analysis, argument and inquiry. While the course reads foundational ancient texts, the skills acquired will be broadly useful among humanities disciplines. This course meets MAPS requirements for English. It satisfies the College of Arts & Sciences Gen Ed Skills Requirement in lower division Written Communication, as well as its Core Curriculum Skills Acquisition requirement in lower division Written Communication.

CLAS 1030 (3). Introduction to Western Philosophy: Ancient.
Develops three related themes: the emergence in antiquity of a peculiarly scientific mode of thinking: the place of religious belief within this developing scientific world view and the force of ethical speculation within the culture and political climates of ancient Greece and Rome. All texts are read in English translation. Equivalent to PHIL 1010 (duplicate degree credit not granted). This is a Guaranteed Transfer (GT) Pathways course in the area of Ways of Thinking (GT-AH3). It further satisfies the College of Arts & Sciences’ Core Curriculum content requirement in Historical Context.

CLAS 1071 (3) Ancient Sport and Spectacle
Surveys the development, evolution and impact of sport and spectacle in the Greco-Roman world through the deconstruction of games during the Christian era of the Roman Empire. Examines, among other relevant topics, games in the Homeric tradition, the development of the Greek Olympics and Roman spectacles including the circus, amphitheaters and gladiators.

CLAS 1100 (3). Greek and Roman Mythology.
Covers Greek and Roman myths as expressions of religious experience and imagination, of Greek and Roman culture and society, and as part of the fabric of Western cultural tradition. Of particular interest to students of literature and the arts, psychology, anthropology, and history. All texts are read in English translation. This course further satisfies the College of Arts & Sciences’ Core Curriculum content requirement in Literature and the Arts.

CLAS 1110 (3). Gods, Monsters and Mortals: Literature of Ancient Greece.
Read about mythological heroes and historical individuals from Achilles to Socrates.  Explore why Greek authors told stories the way they did and what those stories might have meant to them and might mean to us.  All texts are read in English translation. This course further satisfies the College of Arts & Sciences’ Core Curriculum content requirement in Literature and the Arts.

CLAS 1120 (3). Power and Passion in Ancient Rome.
Read about mythological heroes and historical individuals from Romulus to Catiline and the emperors Augustus and Nero.  Explore why Roman authors told stories the way they did and what those stories might have meant and might mean to us.  All texts are read in English translation. This is a Guaranteed Transfer (GT) Pathways course in the area of Literature and Humanities (GT-AH2). It further satisfies the College of Arts & Sciences’ Core Curriculum content requirement in Literature and the Arts.

CLAS 1140 (3). Bread and Circuses: Society and Culture in the Roman World.
Surveys the outstanding achievements of Roman culture and society as reflected in literature, philosophy and art, private and official religion, and legal and political thought. All texts are read in English translation. This is a Guaranteed Transfer (GT) Pathways course in the area of Literature and Humanities (GT-AH2). It further satisfies the College of Arts & Sciences’ Core Curriculum content requirement in Historical Context.

CLAS 2020 (3). Science in the Ancient World.
Covers the development of scientific modes of thought, theory, and research from mythological origins (e.g., Hesiod's poetry) through pre-Socratic philosophers. Culminates in theories and research of Plato and Aristotle, including the Roman Empire. Students read original sources in translation. All texts are read in English translation.

CLAS 2100 (3). Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Greece.
Examines evidence of art, archaeology, and literature of Greek antiquity from a contemporary feminist point of view. Focuses on women's and men's roles in art, literature, and daily life. All texts are read in English translation. Concurrent with WGST 2100 (duplicate degree credit not granted). This course further satisfies the College of Arts & Sciences’ Gen Ed Diversity requirement (global perspective), as well as its Core Curriculum content requirement in Human Diversity.

CLAS 2110 (3). Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Rome.
Uses art, archaeology, and literature to study, from a contemporary feminist point of view, the status of women and men in works of Roman art and literature, the development of attitudes expressed toward them, and their daily life. All texts are read in English translation. Concurrent with WGST 2110 (duplicate degree credit not granted). This is a Guaranteed Transfer (GT) Pathways course in the area of History (GT-HI1). It further satisfies the College of Arts & Sciences’ Gen Ed Diversity requirement (global perspective), as well as its Core Curriculum content requirement in Human Diversity.

CLAS 2610 (3). Paganism to Christianity.
Offers a cultural history of Greek and Roman religion. Students read ancient texts in translation and use evidence from archaeology to reconstruct the shift from paganism to Christianity in antiquity. All texts are read in English translation. Equivalent RLST 2614 of (duplicate degree credit not granted). This course further satisfies the College of Arts & Sciences’ Core Curriculum content requirement in Ideals and Values.

CLAS-3400 (3) Special Topics in Classics.
Topics in Greek, Latin or Classical civilization. May be repeated up to 9 total credit hours for different topics. Multiple enrollment in the same term is allowed when the course is offered with multiple topics in the same term.

CLAS 4040 (3). Seminar in Classical Antiquity.
Examines an advanced topic in classical language, literature, history, philosophy, art, or culture. Combines the techniques of philology with a critical approach to the literary and material legacy of the past. Recommended: second year proficiency in Latin and/or Greek. Repeatable for up to 6 total credit hours for different topics.

CLAS 4110 (3). Greek and Roman Epic.
Students read in English translation the major epics of Graeco-Roman antiquity such as the Iliad, Odyssey, Argonautica, Aeneid, and Metamorphoses. Topics discussed may include the nature of classical epic, its relation to the novel, and its legacy. All texts are read in English translation. Concurrent with CLAS 5110 and HUMN 4110 (duplicate degree credit not granted). This course further satisfies the College of Arts & Sciences’ Core Curriculum content requirement in Literature and the Arts.

CLAS 4120 (3). Greek and Roman Tragedy.
Intensive study of selected tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Seneca in English translation. All texts are read in English translation. Concurrent with CLAS 5120 and HUMN 4120 (duplicate degree credit not granted). This course further satisfies the College of Arts & Sciences’ Core Curriculum content requirement in Literature and the Arts.

CLAS 4130 (3). Greek and Roman Comedy.
Studies Aristophanes, Plautus, and Terence. All texts are read in English translation. Concurrent with CLAS 5130 and HUMN 4130 (duplicate degree credit not granted). This course further satisfies the College of Arts & Sciences’ Core Curriculum content requirement in Literature and the Arts.

CLAS 4140 (3). The Greek and Roman Novel.
Studies a number of complete Greek and Roman novels from Classical Antiquity, and their predecessors and contemporary neighbors in the genres of Greek prose fiction.  Ancient texts in English translation. Concurrent with CLAS 5140 and HUMN 4131 (duplicate degree credit not granted).

CLAS 4840 (1-4). Independent Study.
All texts are read in English translation. May be repeated for up to a total of 7 credit hours. Counts towards any Classics major or minor track. Like all Independent Studies, this course does NOT satisfy any Gen Ed requirement.

CLAS 4852 (1-6) Honors Thesis.
Repeatable:
Repeatable for up to 6 total credit hours.
Additional Information: Arts & Sciences Honors Course
Counts towards any Classics major track. Like all Independent Studies, this course does NOT satisfy any Gen Ed requirement.