ALL Classics classes (but no Independent Studies) satisfy the College of Arts and Sciences’ Gen Ed Arts and Humanities distribution requirement. Further College requirements satisfied by individuals courses are noted in the description of the course in question.

CLAS 1509 (3). Trash and Treasure, Temples and Tombs: Art and Archaeology of the Ancient World.
Introduces the art and archaeology of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece and Rome, examining various ancient approaches to power, religion, death and the human body. Analyzes art, architecture, and everyday trash to learn about ancient humanity. Concurrent with ARTH 1509. Restricted to Freshman and Sophomores. This course further satisfies the College of Arts & Sciences’ Gen Ed Diversity requirement (global perspective), as well as its Core Curriculum content requirement in Historical Context and Literature and the Arts.

CLAS 2029 (3). Art & Archaeology of Ancient Egypt.
Emphasizes the origin of the Egyptian culture, its importance, and its impact on other cultures. In addition, the different points of view of various scholars are discussed with a comparative study of the ancient Egyptian Culture and modern culture of Egypt and the Middle East. Concurrent with ARTH 2029 (duplicate degree credit not granted). This course further satisfies the College of Arts & Sciences’ Gen Ed Diversity requirement (global perspective), as well as its Core Curriculum content requirement in Human Diversity.

CLAS 2039 (3). Greek Art and Archaeology.
Covers prehistoric Aegean through the fourth century B.C.E., considering architecture, pottery, painting, sculpture, and personal ornament. Societal customs such as use of space and burial patterns are considered as well as art and its uses, to help understand developments in Greek culture. Concurrent with ARTH 2039 (duplicate degree credit not granted). This course further satisfies the College of Arts & Sciences’ Core Curriculum content requirement in Literature and the Arts.

CLAS 2049 (3). Introduction to Roman Art and Architecture.
Introduces the monuments and sites of the ancient Roman world from the foundation of Rome (753 B.C.E.) to Constantine (306-337 C.E.). Emphasizes the relationship of art, architecture, and artifacts to the political, social, and religious institutions of Italy and the provinces. Formerly CLAS 3049. Concurrent with ARTH 2049 (duplicate degree credit not granted). This course further satisfies the College of Arts & Sciences’ Core Curriculum content requirement in Literature and the Arts.

CLAS 3009 (3). Modern Issues, Ancient Times.
Considers issues of vital importance to humans, both now and in ancient times. Topics such as food, death, sex, family, literacy, or power are explored to consider how ancient societal norms and attitudes evolved, and how they relate to modern culture. Draws on material and literary evidence to develop an understanding of the complexities of ancient life. Formerly CLAS 2009. Concurrent with ANTH 3009 (duplicate degree credit not granted). May be repeated for up to a total of 6 credit hours. Multiple enrollment in the same term is allowed when the course is offered with multiple topics in the same term.This course further satisfies the College of Arts & Sciences’ Core Curriculum content requirement in Historical Context.

CLAS 3019 (3). Pompeii and the Cities of Vesuvius.
Introduces the towns and villas buried by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 C.E. Explores the layout and decoration of ancient Roman houses, the variety of artifacts uncovered as evidence for daily life and the history of the excavations. Concurrent with ARTH 3019 (duplicate degree credit not granted). This course further satisfies the College of Arts & Sciences’ Core Curriculum content requirement in Historical Context.

CLAS 3119 (3). The Archaeology of Death.
Consider Death. It is a universal human phenomenon. Humans across time and space have caused, planned for, reacted to, and carried out death practices in extraordinarily different ways. Mortuary practice provides a fascinating insight into human history and culture in both the modern and ancient world. Concurrent with ANTH 3119 (duplicate degree credit not granted). This course further satisfies the College of Arts & Sciences’ Gen Ed Social Sciences distribution requirement, as well as its Core Curriculum content requirement in Historical Context.

CLAS 4099 (3) Ancient Greek Sculpture.
Understanding that Greek sculpture, like all visual media, was part of the fabric of ancient Greek life and expressed the values of its creators and audience is a valuable way to gain insights into the social, economic, and political world of ancient Greece. This course will examine the work of Greek sculptors from the Archaic to the Hellenistic period. Key stylistic and technical developments, as well as significant works of art, sculptors and workshops will be discussed in detail. Some issues we will consider are the physical, religious and/or socio-historical context of individual freestanding sculptures and how specific sculptural programs illustrate aspects of Greek culture. Iconographic and narrative choices made by artists working in stone, compared to other material, will also be addressed. Concurrent with CLAS 5099, ARTH 4099 and ARTH 5099 (duplicate degree credit not granted).

CLAS 4109 (3). Ancient Italian Painting.
Explores the problems, theories and methods for understanding the iconography, styles, typologies, contexts and techniques of fresco wall painting in ancient Italy from the 6th century B.C.E. to the 4th century C.E. Topics covered include Etruscan tomb paintings, late Republican and early imperial fresco paintings from Rome and Campania, and later Roman wall paintings, including the painted images in ancient catacombs. Previous coursework on ancient Italy or the history of pre-modern art is highly recommended (CLAS 1509 or ARTH 1509 or CLAS 2049 or ARTH 2049). Concurrent with CLAS 5109 and ARTH 4109 and ARTH 5109 (duplicate degree credit not granted).

CLAS 4119 (3). Roman Sculpture.
Examines ancient Roman sculpture, emphasizing the display, iconography, and production of private and public monuments in the Roman Empire. Explores sculpture as evidence for historical developments, societal and gender attitudes, and state ideologies in the ancient Roman world. Concurrent with CLAS 5119 and ARTH 4119 and ARTH 5119 (duplicate degree credit not granted).

CLAS 4129 (3). Aegean Art and Archaeology.
A detailed study of the cultures of prehistoric Greece, the Cycladic Islands, and Crete, their art and archaeology, and their history within the broader context of the eastern Mediterranean, from earliest human settlement to the collapse of the Bronze Age at about 1100 B.C.E. Emphasis is on palace states. Concurrent with ANTH 4129, ARTH 4129, ANTH 5129, and CLAS 5129 (duplicate degree credit not granted).

CLAS 4139 (3). Greek Vase Painting.
A comprehensive overview of Greek vase painting, from prehistoric through the fourth century B.C.E. Emphasis is on learning the development of primary decorative styles and on refining skills of visual analysis, scholarly research, critical thinking, oral commentary, and written presentation. Concurrent with ARTH 4139, ARTH 5139 and CLAS 5139 (duplicate degree credit not granted).

CLAS 4149 (3). Greek Cities and Sanctuaries.
Examines Greek architecture in context, from the ninth century B.C.E. into the Hellenistic period, considering the use of space, both in religious and in civic settings, and using texts as well as material culture. Emphasis is on developing analytical skills. Concurrent with ARTH 4149 and CLAS 5149 (duplicate degree credit not granted).

CLAS 4169 (3). Topics in Ancient and Classical Art and Archaeology.
In-depth consideration of an aspect of ancient Mediterranean culture. Topics vary; they may include ancient wall painting, Greek sculpture, artists and patrons, the ancient Near East, Egyptian art and archaeology, or Etruscan art and archaeology. May be repeated up to 9 total credit hours providing the topics are different. Concurrent with ARTH 4169, CLAS 5169 and ARTH 5169 (duplicate degree credit not available). May be repeated for up to a total of 9 credit hours, and multiple enrollment in the same term is allowed when the course is offered with multiple topics in the same term.

CLAS 4199 (3). Roman Architecture.
Examines the designs, functions, and construction methods of ancient Roman towns, temples, baths, houses, and civic structures as well as utilitarian structures, including roads and aqueducts. Emphasizes Roman architectural forms and spaces as vehicles for political propaganda and empire consolidation. Concurrent with ARTH 4199 and CLAS 5199 (duplicate degree credit not granted.

CLAS 4209 (6). Classical Archaeological Field Methods.
Offers experiential learning in theories and methods of archaeological fieldwork in the western Argolid in Greece. Applies methods for extensive survey, stratigraphic excavation, GIS modeling, ceramic analysis, numismatic analysis, architectural studies, artifact and data processing and documentation. Concurrent with ARTH 4209 and CLAS 5209 (duplicate degree credit not granted). Offered abroad only. May be repeated for up to a total of 12 credit hours. It is recommended that students have previously taken the following courses: CLAS 1509 or ARTH 1509; CLAS 2039 or ARTH 2039; CLAS 2049 or ARTH 2049.

CLAS 4229 (3) Ancient Egyptian Art and Archaeology.
Archaeology of ancient Egypt in light of recent excavations; the history of excavations of the different sites; and the art of ancient Egypt through time. Formerly ANTH 4420. Concurrent with CLAS 5229, ARTH 4229 and ARTH 5229 (duplicate degree credit not granted).

CLAS 4269 (3). Art and Archaeology of the Ancient Near East.
Examines civilizations of the Iran-Iraq region from the rise of urbanism in Mesopotamia through the era of the first 'world empire,' Achaemenid Persia. Emphasizes the material record of religious and state institutions of the ancient Near East, especially monuments that illustrate concepts of kingship. Explores notions of style, symbolism, visual rhetoric, text-image synthesis, patronage, creativity, and roles of artists. Concurrent with ARTH 4269, ARTH 5269 and CLAS 5269 (duplicate degree credit not granted). It is recommended that students have previously taken the following courses: CLAS 1509 or ARTH 1509. This course further satisfies the Department of Art & Art History’s Asia Content requirement and the College of Arts & Sciences’ Gen Ed Diversity requirement (global perspective) as well as its Core Curriculum content requirement in Human Diversity.

CLAS 4840 (1-4). Independent Study.
All texts are read in English translation. May be repeated for up to a total of 7 credit hours. Counts towards any Classics major or minor track. Like all Independent Studies, this course does NOT satisfy any Gen Ed requirement.

CLAS 4852 (1-6) Honors Thesis.
Repeatable:
Repeatable for up to 6 total credit hours.
Additional Information: Arts & Sciences Honors Course
Counts towards any Classics major track. Like all Independent Studies, this course does NOT satisfy any Gen Ed requirement.