For Students

Do I need a social security number to apply to CU Boulder?

No, you do not need to enter a Social Security Number (SSN) on your admissions application. For additional information see Admissions Information for Undocumented Students and Social Security Number and Card — Deferred Action For Childhood Arrivals.

How do I find out if I qualify for in-state tuition under ASSET?

If you are interested in gaining residency through ASSET, contact the Tuition Classification Manager directly. You may visit the Exceptions to One-Year Domicile webpage for more information (view the ASSET/Three-Year Colorado High School drop down tab under the section Colorado High School Exceptions).

Do students under ASSET qualify for financial aid?

Students attending CU Boulder under DACA or ASSET do not qualify for federal or state financial aid. These students are eligible for the College Opportunity Fund (COF) and may be eligible for institutional and foundational funds. We encourage students attending CU Boulder under DACA or ASSET to apply for scholarships here.

Do students with deferred action qualify under ASSET?

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival (DACA) is not tied to ASSET, however DACA students may receive in-state tuition and COF as long as ASSET residency requirements are met. Eligibility for ASSET in-state residency begins with three years of Colorado high school attendance and completion of a Colorado GED or High School graduation. See additional ASSET requirements.

Where can I find more information regarding employment authorization documents and employment eligibility?

Student employees who are working on campus are encouraged to review the Frequently Asked Questions: Rescission of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) for information about employment authorization documents and employment eligibility.

What are the important deadlines I should know about?

Here are important DACA deadlines following the decision to rescind the program:

Sept. 5, 2017

Last day for new applications.

Oct. 5, 2017

Last day to apply for renewal of permits set to expire on March 5, 2018.

March 5, 2018

DACA expires unless Congress acts to extend it.

 

CU says it has welcomed DACA-eligible students to its campuses for years. How long has the university admitted DACA students and why?

The federal Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program has been in place since 2012, but even before then there were students studying at CU Boulder without documentation, including those who later became DACA-eligible. Since then, CU has welcomed students who are eligible for DACA and Colorado’s Advancing Students for a Stronger Economy Tomorrow (ASSET) program and are seeking to continue their education after graduating from Colorado high schools in good academic standing. Many of the students who benefit from these programs are high-achievers whose families hail from a variety of countries. They are successfully pursuing degrees in education, law, journalism, and the STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) fields despite many personal challenges. As with all of the outstanding students accepted to CU Boulder, these Buffs participate in and support the university’s essential shared values of academic and research excellence and go on to represent the university in the workforce and in their communities in many positive ways after graduation.

In a support statement, CU said it would continue to admit students without regard to their immigration status. Please explain.

Together, the federal Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and Colorado’s Advancing Students for a Stronger Economy Tomorrow (ASSET) programs allow young people brought into the country as children to continue their studies through high school and into college. CU Boulder remains committed to providing all qualified students opportunities to pursue their dreams of graduating with a university degree, and that includes students who are eligible for DACA and ASSET.

CU said it would not release student or employee information to federal officials or anyone else without a lawful subpoena or warrant requiring it to do so. Please explain.

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) protects the privacy of student records and applies to all educational institutions receiving funding from the U.S. Department of Education. CU Boulder remains committed to upholding this federal law and will not release private student records without the express permission of students or a subpoena or warrant from a law-enforcement agency. On the CU Boulder campus, all subpoenas and warrants should be routed through the Office of the Registrar and University Counsel.

CU said it has created programs to provide financial assistance to undocumented students "which we will try to grow." The university also said it would continue to employ people who are eligible for DACA as long as it is able to do so. Please explain.

In April of 2017, the CU Board of Regents established a private fund to aid undocumented students who are pursuing degrees on all four CU campuses. The CU Foundation administers the fund, and DACA, ASSET and other qualified undocumented students may apply for relief funding through the standard financial aid process. Anyone interested in contributing to the fund can write a check to the CU Foundation, 1800 Grant St., Suite 725, Denver, CO 80203. Donations should specify that it is for the Student Relief Fund and indicate which campus it should go toward. In addition to students, CU employs people who may be DACA eligible, and is committed to keeping them employed as long as DACA remains in place or if Congress enacts a legislative solution providing a legal status for those currently protected by program.

How can I show my support for DACA students and employees?

While the university appreciates your willingness to support DACA students and employees, please be mindful that it is important to respect their right to privacy. Some may be comfortable discussing their situation. Others may not. If a classmate or co-worker is receptive, here are a few ways you can show your support:

  • Share information and resources that you learn about on campus and in the community that may be available to DACA-eligible members of the CU Boulder community.
  • Partner with student organizations on campus that are strategizing on ways of supporting DACA college students through the legislative process.
  • Stay informed and share any updates you learn of with classmates and friends who have been affected by the decision to rescind DACA.
  • Contact the Office of Diversity, Equity and Community Engagement (ODECE) for more information on how you can be supportive.
  • All students can find support through Wardenburg Health Services' Counseling and Psychiatric Services (CAPS) or the Office of Victim Assistance (OVA).

For Faculty & Staff

What is ASSET and what is DACA, and how are they they different?

ASSET (Advancing Students for a Stronger Economy Tomorrow) is a Colorado law adopted on April 29, 2013, allowing eligible undocumented students to pay in-state tuition and receive the Colorado Opportunity Fund (COF) stipend at Colorado public colleges and universities.

DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) is a 2012 executive order from President Obama that grants deferred deportation action (renewable every two years), a Social Security Number (SSN) and employment authorization.

Students who qualify for ASSET do not automatically qualify for DACA and vice versa. A student may qualify for ASSET or DACA only, qualify for both, or qualify for neither. These policies do not automatically grant federal financial aid or a path to U.S. citizenship.

If I want to learn more about undocumented students, where can I go?

On average, undocumented students in the United States arrived at the age of 6, which means they grew up in the United States and attended U.S. schools. Many undocumented students are from "mixed-status families," which means that some family members are U.S. citizens and others are undocumented. Most undocumented students, including those with ASSET and/or DACA status, have demonstrated extraordinary resilience, and have overcome difficult odds to succeed in U.S. society. Approximately two-thirds immigrated to the United States from Mexico or another Latin American country. Others are immigrants from various countries in Asia, the Middle East, Africa and Europe.

Web Resources

  • Define American is a nonprofit organization working to further our collective understanding about immigrants, identity and citizenship.

Books

  • Lives in Limbo: Undocumented and Coming of Age in America, Roberto G. Gonzales (2015)
  • Americans By Heart: Undocumented Latino Students and the Promise of Higher Education, William Pérez (2012)
Where can I find more information regarding employment authorization documents and employment eligibility?

Student employees, faculty and staff who are working on campus and are on DACA status are encouraged to review the Frequently Asked Questions: Rescission of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) for more information about employment authorization documents (EAD) and employment eligibility.

What are the important deadlines I should know about?

Here are important DACA deadlines:

Sept. 5, 2017

Last day for new applications.

Oct. 5, 2017

Last day to apply for renewal of permits that expire by March 5.

March 5, 2018

DACA expires unless the U.S. Congress acts to extend it.

CU said it would not release student or employee information to federal officials or anyone else without a lawful subpoena or warrant requiring it to do so. Please explain.

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) protects the privacy of student records and applies to all educational institutions receiving funding from the U.S. Department of Education. CU Boulder remains committed to upholding this federal law and will not release private student records without the express permission of students or a subpoena or warrant from a law-enforcement agency. On the CU Boulder campus, all subpoenas and warrants should be routed through the Office of the Registrar and University Counsel.

Who can I contact about the Form I-9 (employment eligibility verification)?

Please contact the Department of Human Resources at 303-492-6475.

Where can faculty and staff go for support?

For support, the Faculty & Staff Assistance Program is dedicated to serving the emotional and psychological needs of the campus community. All FSAP staff are trained as generalist counselors and are equipped to deal with a wide range of personal and work-related issues. Contact FSAP at 303-492-3020.

How can I show my support for DACA students and employees?

While the university appreciates your willingness to support DACA students and employees, please be mindful that it is important to respect their right to privacy. Some may be comfortable discussing their situation. Others may not. If a classmate or co-worker is receptive, here are a few ways you can show your support:

  • Share information and resources that you learn about on campus and in the community that may be available to DACA-eligible members of the CU Boulder community.
  • Partner with student organizations on campus that are strategizing on ways of supporting DACA college students through the legislative process.
  • Stay informed and share any updates you learn of with classmates and friends who have been affected by the decision to rescind DACA.
  • Contact the Office of Diversity, Equity and Community Engagement (ODECE) for more information on how you can be supportive.
  • Finally, all students can find support through Wardenburg Health Services' Counseling and Psychiatric Services (CAPS) or the Office of Victim Assistance (OVA).