Color coded US map of how rain-on-snow events can create potential nitrogen sources. Northern areas of the northeast, midwest, and northwest coast have high potential.

As winters warm, nutrient pollution threatens 40% of U.S. (U Vermont)

Oct. 10, 2022

As climate changes, previously frozen chemical runoff from farms and fields puts water quality at risk in over 40 states, research says. Keith Musselman part of team looking at winter nutrient pollution, a new problem caused by climate change.

A multidisciplinary team walks through an open forest to survey the future site of an EcoTram, a moving monitoring platform

Persistent places update: Groups come together to define and map climate change in Colorado’s public lands

July 28, 2022

A convergence research project is uniting land managers, local residents, and scientists to jointly understand how Colorado Front Range ecosystems and public lands are responding to pressures from people and climate change.

Narrow canyon in Lake Powell showing lowered water level

Climate change will make it hard to predict the amount of snow and water that will be available (ABC News)

July 20, 2022

A new study that included Will Wieder and Keith Musselman finds that snow-free seasons are expected to last longer, putting Northern Hemisphere water supplies at risk.

Mountain stream flows in a wide grassy valley with snowcapped peaks in background

Water resources to become less predictable with climate change (NCAR & UCAR News)

July 18, 2022

Water resources will fluctuate increasingly and become more difficult to predict in snow-dominated regions across the Northern Hemisphere by later this century, according to a comprehensive new climate change study. Even regions that keep receiving the same amount of precipitation will experience more variable and unpredictable streamflow as snowpack recedes.

Map of dry vs wet conditions for coterminous US

These maps illustrate the seriousness of the western drought (Washington Post)

June 16, 2022

Historic drought has depleted groundwater, melted the snowpack, and dried up lakes--and it will get worse. Washington Post visual story (paywall) illustrated by maps from the Mountain Hydrology Lab.

Frozen branch begins to melt

Eye on Earth: What happens when mountain snow melts too fast in the spring? (CBS Denver)

April 26, 2022

Keith Musselman was interviewed for this CBS Denver news story on the effects of climate change on deep snowpack.

Partially burned forest, still smoking

After wildfires, scorched trees could disrupt water supplies (AP News)

April 22, 2022

As climate change fuels the spread of wildfires across the West, researchers want to know how the dual effect might disrupt water supplies. Noah Molotch is among those interviewed.

Skier on a half pipe

Q&A with an expert: Winter Olympics in a warming world (CU Boulder Today)

Feb. 1, 2022

When the 2022 Winter Olympics kick off in and around Beijing, China, this Friday it will mark the first time in the history of the Winter Games that outdoor events rely almost entirely on artificial snow. Noah Molotch speaks to the science of human-made snow, its use at the Olympics, and how climate change may impact the future of snow sports around the world and here in Colorado.

Boulder flatirons after a light snow

The Western U.S. might be seeing its last snowy winters (Fast Company)

Jan. 12, 2022

Because of climate change, the snowpack in the Western U.S. is already 20% less than it was in the 1950s, a volume of water that could fill Lake Mead, the largest reservoir in the country. By the end of the century, most years in the region could be nearly snowless. Keith Musselman is interviewed.

Dry grass

How climate change primed Colorado for a rare December wildfire (NBC News)

Jan. 2, 2022

The ground, typically moist from snow this time of year, was dry and flammable as a result of unusually warm temperatures and a lack of precipitation in recent months, said experts including INSTAAR snow hydrologist Keith Musselman.

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