David Armstrong

Ph. D. University of Kansas, Lawrence, 1971 • Professor Emeritus
EBIO
Evolutionary biogeography; community and conservation ecology; human impact on native ecosystems; ecology, distribution, and systematics of mammals of western North America and Middle America; science in general education; history of biology, especially ecology & evolution.

Marc Bekoff

Professor Emeritus
EBIO

Carl Bock

Professor Emeritus
EBIO
Grassland ecology, fire ecology, ecology of birds, conservation biology related to the above topics.

Jane H. Bock

Professor Emeritus
EBIO
The ecology and evolution of flowering plants in the Colorado Alpine and High Plains, and similar areas elsewhere in the Northern Hemisphere and the reproductive patterns of flowering plants.
Jane.Bock@Colorado.edu     970-593-0343

Richard E. Jones

Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1968 • Professor Emeritus
EBIO
Comparative vertebrate reproduction and comparative endrocrinology. Current projects include mechanisms controlling the number of eggs ovulated from vertebrate ovaries, alternation of brain function and ovulation in lizards, and the biology of aging in salmon.

Yan Linhart

Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1972 • Professor Emeritus
EBIO
Dynamics of evolutionary change in plants. Current research includes (1) evolutionary consequences of plant-animal interactions, (2) long-term studies of the population dynamics and evolution of forest trees, (3) investigations of the factors that cause genetic differentiation of populations.

Carol B. Lynch

Ph.D., University of Iowa, 1971 • Professor Emeritus
EBIO
The genetic basis of evolutionary adaptation, and brain mechanisms underlying adaptive behaviors. A model system has been the study of cold adaptation in mice, with emphasis on nest-building. We have available replicated genetic lines in mice that have been selectively bred for over 60 generations for differences in nest-building. These lines also differ in genetically correlated traits, such as body weight and litter size, as well as circadian rhythms and brain (hypothalmus) neurochemistry and neuroanatomy. These lines facilitate studies of both constraints on adaptive evolution, and the path from genes to behavior.

Russell K. Monson

Ph.D., Washington State University, 1982 • Professor Emeritus
EBIO
Plant physiological ecology; forest-atmosphere exchanges of carbon dioxide, water vapor, ozone and energy; environmental and physiological control over the emission of isoprene and other biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from forest ecosystems and the relationship of VOC emissions to atmospheric chemistry; coupling of biogeochemical cycles, especially those involving water, carbon and nitrogen; the evolution of C4 photosynthesis in plants. Two primary efforts in my lab involve (1) studies of forest carbon and water flux at the Niwot Ridge Ameriflux site, located near Boulder in a high-elevation subalpine forest, and (2) studies of the biochemical and physiological controls over isoprene, monoterpene and acetaldehyde emissions from forest trees in relation to future climate change and elevated atmospheric CO 2 concentrations. Our aims in the effort related to forest-atmosphere fluxes involve quantification of forest carbon fluxes and elucidation of the principal biological and environmental controls over spatial and temporal variability in forest carbon sequestration. This effort supports the broader aim of understanding the global terrestrial carbon cycle. Our aims in the effort related to the controls over isoprene, monoterpene and acetaldehyde emissions involve development of fundamental biochemically-based models to predict how forests affect air quality in a future environment characterized by higher global temperatures, more frequent extreme climate events, and higher atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations.

Harvey Nichols

Ph.D., University of Leicester, England, 1964 • Professor Emeritus
EBIO
Paleo-ecology, arctic and alpine environments, and global change, with emphasis on pollen analysis (palynology) as a method of reconstructing past vegetation and climate to understand the present environment and to act as background for current environmental concerns. The program has involved over twenty expeditions into the arctic to study past movements of the arctic tree-line driven by climatic change, which now provides an important perspective and test for the Greenhouse Hypothesis. An agreement has been reached with the Central Siberian Botanical Institute to exchange American and Russian students to explore the Siberian and North American arctic tree-line for signs of atmospheric warming in a long-term research project.