Stem cell center user using a microscope to inspect cells.The CU-Boulder Stem Cell Research and Technology Resource Center is a campus-wide shared facility with the mission of promoting interdisciplinary research utilizing stem cells.

Promoting Stem Cell Research

Stem cells hold great promise for a number of biomedical applications. This includes serving as models to further our understanding of complex biological processes, such as development and disease, to serving as tools for repairing and replacing tissues in the burgeoning field of regenerative medicine. Some of the biomedical problems being actively addressed on the CU-Boulder campus include cancer, heart and skeletal muscle diseases, human reproduction and birth defects, neurological disorders, diabetes, the microbiome, mitochondrial diseases, immune system abnormalities, infectious diseases, and the role of genetics and epigenetics in many diseases.

Human stem cell iPSC colony.The Center provides users with a clean, dedicated space specifically for culturing human induced plurupotent stem cells (iPSCs), occupying approximately 1,250 square feet of newly-renovated space on the second floor of Porter Biosciences. The Center will be home to seven biosafety cabinets, twelve CO2 and variable oxygen control (tri-gas) incubators, inverted phase contrast microscopes, and a sterile dissection hood equipped with a dissecting microscope and heated stage. Additional equipment to be available to users includes inverted fluorescence microscopes with live-cell time-lapse capabilities, centrifuges, liquid nitrogen cryostorage space, refrigerators, freezers, water baths, a dedicated bioengineering space, and a viral expression core. Standard iPSC consumables (i.e., pipettes, plasticware, media, substrates, etc.) are readily available to users. Routine mycoplasma testing is performed in-house and karyotyping services are carried out via contract.

Stem cell center users using a biosafety cabinet.The Center also serves as a resource beyond its space. We provide hands-on training as well as advice on all aspects of culturing human iPSCs, including options for differentiation, genome-editing, reprogramming, 3D culture, in addition to troubleshooting, data interpretation, developing novel protocols, help with experimental design and implementation, and more. We will also eagerly discuss how to translate your non-stem cell research to a human iPSC model system, connect you with potential collaborators, and collaborate on grant proposals. As part of our mission of promoting iPSC research, we also organize a monthly iPSC seminar series.

Stem cell center user in the dissection microscope hood.Please contact the Center to find out how you can get started using this shared facility! The Center is available to both non-profit academic researchers and for-profit groups.

Acknowledging the Center

Please be sure to acknowledge the Center in publications with a statement such as: “We acknowledge the Stem Cell Research and Technology Resource Center and its Director, Teisha Rowland, at the University of Colorado Boulder for use of the Center space and advice with our iPSC research.”