Telomeres

The unexpected complexities of TERT, a key cancer driver

Sept. 11, 2019

Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), an enzyme associated with nearly all malignant human cancers, is even more diverse and unconventional than previously realized, new University of Colorado Boulder research finds. Telomeres, the protective ends of chromosomes, help to maintain genomic stability. In most normal adult human cells, the telomeres eventually shorten...

Tom Cech

Nobel Laureate, Tom Cech, Ph.D., suggests new way to target third most common oncogene, TERT

Sept. 10, 2019

Healthy cells have a built-in self-destruct mechanism: Strands of DNA called "telomeres" act as protective caps on the ends of your chromosomes. Each time a cell replicates, telomeres get a little shorter. Think of it like filing your nails with an Emory board - after enough filing, you hit your...

Illustration: National Institutes of Health

A key ‘kill switch’ in a gene-regulating protein group

Sept. 9, 2019

CU Boulder and Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) biochemists have revealed a key regulatory process in a gene-suppressing protein group that could hold future applications for drug discovery and clinical treatment of diseases, including cancer. The new research, recently published in the journal Genes & Development , centered on a...

Chris Smith

Chris Smith (IQ Biology): Evolution Meeting

June 26, 2019

I just got back from the Evolution Meeting in Providence and I’m full of information and ideas for research. I had the opportunity to reconnect with past colleagues and meet some new people. Other CU Boulder folks attended, including the labs of Dan Doak, Nancy Emery, Nolan Kane, Stacy Smith,...

Engineering Center

New biomedical engineering degrees to launch at CU Boulder

June 13, 2019

Undergraduate and graduate students at CU Boulder will soon get new opportunities to pursue careers in the biomedical industry. At a meeting this week, members of the CU Board of Regents voted to approve a series of new degrees in biomedical engineering offered by the CU Boulder College of Engineering...

Yuanyuan Xie

Yuanyuan Xie awarded National Cancer Center fellowship to explore the pathological role of transposons

June 12, 2019

Nearly all species’ genomes are littered with millions of genetic sequences called transposons, which are virus-like parasitic elements that can replicate and spread within host genomes. Collectively, transposon-derived sequences constitute about 50 percent of the human genome sequence, and are believed to have - over tens of millions of years...

Sunflower

Do plants have social networks?

May 15, 2019

Humans interact in social networks every day around the office coffee pot, online with Facebook and in their communities through political elections. The structure and connections within these networks and others shape how information is shared. That in turn defines much of our modern life and collective behavior, though little...

Inside Hire Ed

Pedigree and Productivity

May 2, 2019

A 2015 study found that “social inequality” across a range of disciplines was so bad that just 25 percent of Ph.D. institutions produced 71 to 86 percent of tenured and tenure-track professors, depending on field. The effect was more extreme the farther up the chain the researchers looked, based on...

Graphs for article "Pedigree is Not Destiny"

'Pedigree is not destiny' when it comes to scholarly success

May 1, 2019

What matters more to a scientist’s career success: where they currently work, or where they got their Ph.D.? It’s a question a team of researchers teases apart in a new paper published in PNAS . Their analysis calls into question a common assumption underlying academia: that a researcher’s productivity reflects...

Karolin and Natalie

Biochemists untangle mysteries of cellular form, function

April 25, 2019

The complex inner workings of cells, from their architecture to their signaling, underlie much of multicellular organic life. How are they built? How do their proteins interact? And most crucially, how can understanding these functions improve our knowledge of biological outcomes such as disease? University of Colorado Boulder Distinguished Professors...

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