maria lo

Sie Fellowship Blog: Maria Lo

Oct. 21, 2019

Maria Lo Blog post 9/30/19 I am very thankful to the Sie Foundation and the Linda Crnic Institute for the opportunity to perform research aimed at enhancing the lives of individuals with Down Syndrome, or Trisomy 21. The Sie Fellowship has provided me with the resources to apply my skillset...

cardiello

Sie Fellowship Blog: Joseph Cardiello

Oct. 21, 2019

Joseph Cardiello Year 1 blog update Year 1: October 1, 2018-September 1, 2019 Sie Foundation Fellowship The first year of being funded by the Sie Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship has been quite eventful as I set out to learn a host of new wet lab techniques, analysis methods, and a new...

Yellow Fish

Copying tricks from the animal kingdom

Oct. 8, 2019

What can we learn from prairie voles, Burmese pythons, shortfin mollies, and naked mole rats? Researchers from across the world are studying unusual laboratory animals with astonishing traits in their quest to answer important questions in the fields of biomedicine and neuroscience.

Telomeres

The unexpected complexities of TERT, a key cancer driver

Sept. 11, 2019

Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), an enzyme associated with nearly all malignant human cancers, is even more diverse and unconventional than previously realized, new University of Colorado Boulder research finds. Telomeres, the protective ends of chromosomes, help to maintain genomic stability. In most normal adult human cells, the telomeres eventually shorten...

Rat cardiac fibroblasts—which happen to be in the shape of a heart—grown on hydrogels mimicking cardiac tissue and treated with human serum.

Mimicking the heart's microenvironment

Sept. 11, 2019

CU Boulder engineers and faculty from the Consortium for Fibrosis Research & Translation (CFReT) at the CU Anschutz Medical Campus have teamed up to develop biomaterial-based “mimics” of heart tissues to measure patients’ responses to an aortic valve replacement procedure, offering new insight into the ways that cardiac tissue re-shapes...

Tom Cech

Nobel Laureate, Tom Cech, Ph.D., suggests new way to target third most common oncogene, TERT

Sept. 10, 2019

Healthy cells have a built-in self-destruct mechanism: Strands of DNA called "telomeres" act as protective caps on the ends of your chromosomes. Each time a cell replicates, telomeres get a little shorter. Think of it like filing your nails with an Emory board - after enough filing, you hit your...

Illustration: National Institutes of Health

A key ‘kill switch’ in a gene-regulating protein group

Sept. 9, 2019

CU Boulder and Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) biochemists have revealed a key regulatory process in a gene-suppressing protein group that could hold future applications for drug discovery and clinical treatment of diseases, including cancer. The new research, recently published in the journal Genes & Development , centered on a...

Chris Smith

Chris Smith (IQ Biology): Evolution Meeting

June 26, 2019

I just got back from the Evolution Meeting in Providence and I’m full of information and ideas for research. I had the opportunity to reconnect with past colleagues and meet some new people. Other CU Boulder folks attended, including the labs of Dan Doak, Nancy Emery, Nolan Kane, Stacy Smith,...

Engineering Center

New biomedical engineering degrees to launch at CU Boulder

June 13, 2019

Undergraduate and graduate students at CU Boulder will soon get new opportunities to pursue careers in the biomedical industry. At a meeting this week, members of the CU Board of Regents voted to approve a series of new degrees in biomedical engineering offered by the CU Boulder College of Engineering...

Yuanyuan Xie

Yuanyuan Xie awarded National Cancer Center fellowship to explore the pathological role of transposons

June 12, 2019

Nearly all species’ genomes are littered with millions of genetic sequences called transposons, which are virus-like parasitic elements that can replicate and spread within host genomes. Collectively, transposon-derived sequences constitute about 50 percent of the human genome sequence, and are believed to have - over tens of millions of years...

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