Aaron Clauset is an assistant professor of computer science at CU-Boulder and a faculty member of the BioFrontiers Institute.

Five Questions about Network Science

July 3, 2016

Five Questions for Aaron Clauset Aaron Clauset is an assistant professor of computer science at CU-Boulder and a faculty member of the BioFrontiers Institute. He recently accepted the 2016 Erdős-Rényi Prize in Network Science, which is an international prize awarded annually to a researcher under 40 who has made fundamental... Read more »
BioFrontiers' Aaron Clauset used computer networking techniques to better understand malaria's genetic strategy.

Tracking malaria's evolution

Oct. 12, 2015

A new paper published Nature Communications , coauthored by a researcher at the University of Colorado’s BioFrontiers Institute, looked at the genetic strategy used by the human malaria parasite and how old it is from an evolutionary perspective. BioFrontiers’ Aaron Clauset, an assistant professor of computer science, was part of... Read more »
Sara Sawyer recently joined BioFrontiers. Now that the dust is settling in her lab, she's back to focusing on zoonotic diseases.

Using evolution to fight disease

June 25, 2015

New BioFrontiers lab uses evolution to fight disease by Paul McDivitt Photo: Sara Sawyer Ebola comes from bats, HIV from primates, and new strains of influenza from birds and pigs. With zoonotic diseases – those capable of transmission from animals to humans – grabbing headlines across the globe, understanding how... Read more »
Phil Richardson, an author on a paper recently published in Nature, developed a love for bioinformatics in BioFrontiers' Robin Dowell's lab. His next move: pursuing a graduate degree in medical genomics.

Bioinformatics answers questions

June 5, 2015

Bioinformatics answers questions of cancer and career path Phil Richardson, an author on a paper recently published in Nature, developed a love for bioinformatics in BioFrontiers' Robin Dowell's lab. His next move: pursuing a graduate degree in medical genomics. At some point in school, we were taught that humans are... Read more »
Chris Smith is a student in the BioFrontiers Institute's IQ Biology PhD program.

IQ Biology student wins 2015 GRFP fellowship from NSF

May 28, 2015

The National Science Foundation recently announced the recipients of the coveted 2015 Graduate Research Fellowship (GRFP) awards . These prestigious awards have been given since 1952 to graduate students who show a demonstrated potential for significant achievements in science and engineering. Chris Smith, a first-year student from the BioFrontiers Institute’s... Read more »
BioFrontiers Hubert Yin is focused on toll-like receptors that may play a role in new therapies for neurodegenerative diseases.

Finding a new strategy for Parkinson's

May 12, 2015

If you believe the common adage that you are only using ten percent of your brain, while the other ninety percent remains untapped potential, you are about to be surprised. It’s true that about ten percent of your nervous system is made up of hard-working neurons, diligently delivering messages back... Read more »
Joel Kralj is using fluorescent proteins to reveal how bacterial use electricity to stay alive.

Cracking the code on bacterial voltage

April 13, 2015

Searle Scholars Award winner is cracking the code on bacterial voltage Electric voltage powers life – Our brains use electrical transients to process every thought; every heartbeat arises from voltage changes in heart cells. Despite its importance, voltage changes in bacteria were never really studied because the cells were just... Read more »
BioFrontiers Hubert Yin is focused on toll-like receptors that may play a role in new cancer therapies.

Unlocking toll-like receptors

April 10, 2015

BioFrontiers’ Hubert Yin is unlocking the power of toll-like receptors Hubert Yin has been thinking about one type of cell receptor since he joined the BioFrontiers Institute, and it is a receptor worthy of that kind of time. Yin, an Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, is focusing much of... Read more »
Telomeres sit at the ends of chromosomes to protect their genetic data (colorful DNA pic) Credit: Jane Ades, NHGRI

Research on small cellular changes may lead to big cancer solutions

March 10, 2015

Among cancers, scientists have spent their entire research careers looking for cellular similarities that may lead to a single cure for many cancers –– the rare chance to have a single answer to a multifaceted problem. In 1997, scientists discovered a gene that they believed was the key to cellular... Read more »
Daniel Malmer is a second-year graduate student in the IQ Biology Interdisciplinary PhD program at BioFrontiers.

IQ Biology Blog: Computing Machinery and Mouse Genomes

March 10, 2015

I recently attended the 2014 Association for Computing Machinery Conference on Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, and Health Informatics (ACM BCB) with fellow IQ Biology student Joey Azofeifa and our advisor Robin Dowell. The conference had many interesting talks, ranging from theory-heavy explanations of algorithm improvements to very applied talks on using... Read more »

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