First Stars Envisioned illustration NSF
Why Finding The First Stars In Our Universe Puts Us Closer To The Big Bang

March 12, 2018

From Colorado Public Radio: Astronomers have detected the first stars ever to shine in the universe, an event that happened more than 13 billion years ago. No one’s actually seen them -- scientists picked up their radio waves. But Doug Duncan, director emeritus of the Fiske Planetarium in Boulder, says...

Photograph of the EDGES experiment showing the antenna used to verify the original measurements photo courtesy of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
Astronomers Use Radio Waves to Look Back at First Stars in the Universe

March 2, 2018

From KJZZ 91.5 Radio: The story of the universe as we know it and the planet we live on begins with the first star. In 2016, the Hubble Telescope measured the oldest known galaxy in the universe — one that formed 400 million years after the Big Bang. A group...

Falcon Heavy at KSC by Jay Bennett
Falcon Heavy for the Outer Solar System

March 2, 2018

From Popular Mechanics: "If that thing goes up 200 feet and explodes, I'm jumping in the water"—so says one of the tens of thousands of spectators who made the pilgrimage to NASA's Kennedy Space Center. We're looking at Elon Musk's Falcon Heavy rocket on the launch pad about three miles...

Stars with Galaxy NASA image
Scientists Discover Possible link between Dark Matter and Super-cooled Star Formation

March 1, 2018

From BGR Media: Scientists have long attempted to paint a detailed picture of what the universe looked like in the immediate aftermath of the big bang, and new research suggests that some of their most basic assumptions have been entirely incorrect. Researchers studying some of the most ancient regions of...

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Possible Interaction between Baryons and Dark-matter Particles Revealed by the First Stars

March 1, 2018

From Nature: The cosmic radio-frequency spectrum is expected to show a strong absorption signal corresponding to the 21-centimetre-wavelength transition of atomic hydrogen around redshift 20, which arises from Lyman-α radiation from some of the earliest stars. By observing this 21-centimetre signal—either its sky-averaged spectrum or maps of its fluctuations, obtained...

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An Absorption Profile Centered at 78 megahertz in the Sky-averaged Spectrum

March 1, 2018

From Nature: After stars formed in the early Universe, their ultraviolet light is expected, eventually, to have penetrated the primordial hydrogen gas and altered the excitation state of its 21-centimetre hyperfine line. This alteration would cause the gas to absorb photons from the cosmic microwave background, producing a spectral distortion...

The EDGES ground-based radio spectrometer
Did Dark Matter Make The Early Universe Chill Out?

Feb. 28, 2018

From NPR: Scientists have probed a period of the universe's early history that no one has been able to explore before — and they got a surprise: It was far colder in the young universe, before the first stars blinked on, than astronomers previously thought. What's more, that cosmic chill...

EDGES Instrument
When Stars Were Born: Earliest Starlight’s Effects Are Detected

Feb. 28, 2018

From The New York Times: It was morning in the universe and much colder than anyone had expected when light from the first stars began to tickle and excite their dark surroundings nearly 14 billion years ago. Astronomers using a small radio telescope in Australia reported on Wednesday that they...

EDGES instrument in Western Australia
Astronomers detect light from the Universe’s first stars

Feb. 28, 2018

From Nature: Astronomers have for the first time spotted long-sought signals of light from the earliest stars ever to form in the Universe — around 180 million years after the Big Bang. The signal is a fingerprint left on background radiation by hydrogen that absorbed some of this primordial light...

First Stars Envisioned illustration NSF
Scientists Find Signal From The First Stars In The Universe In A Monumental Moment For Astronomy

Feb. 28, 2018

From IFL Science: In a groundbreaking discovery, scientists say they have found a signal from some of the earliest stars in the universe, giving us an unparalleled glimpse into the dawn of the cosmos. The signals originate from hydrogen gas from just 180 million years after the Big Bang, itself...

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