Published: May 14, 2019

Authors: Steven Furlanetto, Adam Beardsley, Chris L. Carilli, Jordan Mirocha, James Aguirre, Yacine Ali-Haimoud, Marcelo Alvarez, George Becker, Judd D. Bowman, Patrick Breysse, Volker Bromm, Philip Bull, Jack Burns, Isabella P. Carucci, Tzu-Ching Chang, Hsin Chiang, Joanne Cohn, Frederick Davies, David DeBoer, Mark Dickinson, Joshua Dillon, Olivier Doré, Cora Dvorkin, Anastasia Fialkov, Steven Finkelstein, Nick Gnedin, Bryna Hazelton, Daniel Jacobs, Kirit Karkare, Leon Koopmans, Ely Kovetz, Paul La Plante, Adam Lidz, Adrian Liu, Yin-Zhe Ma, Yi Mao, Kiyoshi Masui, Matthew McQuinn, Andrei Mesinger, Julian Munoz, Steven Murray, Aaron Parsons, Jonathan Pober, Brant Robertson, Jonathan Sievers, Eric Switzer, Nithyanandan Thyagarajan, Hy Trac, Eli Visbal, Matias Zaldarriaga

Abstract: The early phases of galaxy formation constitute one of the most exciting frontiers in astrophysics. It is during this era that the first luminous sources reionize the intergalactic medium - the moment when structure formation affects every baryon in the Universe. Here we argue that we will obtain a complete picture of this era by combining observations of galaxies with direct measurements of the reionization process: the former will provide a detailed understanding of bright sources, while the latter will constrain the (substantial) faint source population. We further describe how optimizing the comparison of these two measurements requires near-infrared galaxy surveys covering large volumes and retaining redshift information and also improvements in 21-cm analysis, moving those experiments into the imaging regime. Read more...