Lit up paper box that says, "ATLAS."

Ruhan Yang passes preliminary exam

Aug. 23, 2022

ATLAS PhD Student Ruhan Yang passed her preliminary exam on August 4. Her work on her dissertation, "Paper Robot Building Kits: Present and Future," is overseen by Professor Ellen Do, Professor Mark Gross and Assistant Professor Daniel Leithinger.

Chembot

Kailey Shara passes comprehensive exam

Aug. 23, 2022

ATLAS Institute PhD candidate Kailey Shara passed her comprehensive exam on August 8. Her work on her dissertation, "Designing New Hardware for Chemical Automation," is overseen by committee members Assistant Professor Carson J. Bruns, Professor Mark Gross, Daniel Szafir, assistant professor of computer science at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Associate Professor Gregory Whiting and Professor Eric Bogatin.

Two cardboard Tinycade consoles.

Peter Gyory passes comprehensive exam

Aug. 23, 2022

ATLAS Institute PhD candidate Peter Gyory passed his comprehensive exam on August 18. His work on his dissertation, “Developing Tools to Support Approachable Game Controller Design,” is overseen by committee members, Professor Ellen Do, Associate Professor Amy Banic, Associate Professor Joel Swanson, Michael Rivera, Patrick LeMieux and Professor Mark Gross.

Joanne Reid pointing a rifle at her Biathlon target.

ICTD grad Joanne Reid competes in second Winter Olympics Biathlon

Jan. 31, 2022

When the 2022 Olympic Games open in Beijing, China on Friday, ATLAS graduate Joanne Reid (ICTD '17) will be among the U.S. athletes, competing against the best of the best in the biathlon, a winter sport that combines rifle sharpshooting with Nordic skiing.

Stephanie Wanek

Stephanie Wanek shares fulfilling work, passion for ATLAS community, with alma-mater

May 19, 2021

Stephanie Wanek has been a longtime CU Boulder staff member, including with the ATLAS Institute and National Center for Women in Info Tech/NCWIT. In this interview with her alma mater, the Cathedral School of St. John the Divine in New York City, Wanek shares her love for the university and...

Marquee of the Boulder Theatre with the NVC 14 on it with photos of Kailey Shara and Darren Sholes and their projects surrounding it

ATLAS PhD students compete for NVC 14 "Audience Choice Award"

April 13, 2021

On April 13, the audience of the New Venture Challenge 14 will vote for their favorite startup, including two teams headed by ATLAS PhD students, with the winner taking home a $1,000 "Audience Choice Award."

Shanel Wu demonstrates tablet weaving at a research showcase for human-computer interaction and information science.

ATLAS PhD Student Shanel Wu discusses their smart textiles work in Gist Yarn podcast

April 12, 2021

Shanel Wu, ATLAS PhD student, discusses their work with smart textiles, weaving, computational craft and hardware hacking in this fiber arts podcast.

Denise Powell

Geoinspirations Podcast Series: Denise Powell - Reimagining what a university can be and do

Aug. 25, 2020

In this podcast, Denise Powell, ATLAS lecturer and Social Impact alumna, shares with Joseph Kerski, education manager and geographer for Esri, and Directions magazine her impressions of the ATLAS Social Impact program. For the past few years Kerski has guest lectured to Social Impact MS students, showing how GIS can be used to help them make better decisions in the field.

Smart textile

E-Textiles, Smart Textiles, Flexible Hybrid Electronics: Who’s Saying What?

Aug. 14, 2020

In a project led by ATLAS PhD student, Shanel Wu, the Unstable Design Lab and LOOMIA jointly ran a survey asking those working in e-textiles how they liked to talk about their work. The results are a fascinating exploratory poke into the interdisciplinary nature of the emerging e-textiles field.

A tape measure clock with a view of the outside and inside.

CTD students' project featured in Hackaday

April 28, 2020

TAM students Alex Fiel and Anna Lynton took a tape measure and turned it into a clock, programming it to move over the course of the day to show the time in hours (inches). The largest challenge became minifying the electronics and keeping the overall footprint of the device to roughly the size of the real object.

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