grace leslie on right wearing eeg headband prepares for brain music performance

Can music heal? This artist and researcher wants to find out

Dec. 6, 2022

Electronic musician, flutist and researcher Grace Leslie believes that music touches something deep in the human brain—a hardwired need, perhaps, to sit around a fire or in a concert arena and feel connected to the people around us. Humans have been making music for longer than we’ve lived in cities and grown crops. “In most cultures, it’s used to draw people together,” says Leslie.

textile and a hand with muiltimeter on top

Bits and Threads: Weaving Cultural Worlds and Computing in Community-Based Settings

Nov. 14, 2022

A Denver Public Library makerspace collaborates with Laura Devendorf's Unstable Design Lab and Ricarose Roque to offer the public textile-focused maker activities.

sheng-fen "nik" chien

ATLAS welcomes Professor Sheng-Fen “Nik” Chien as visiting scientist and scholar

Aug. 19, 2022

ATLAS welcomes Professor Sheng-Fen “Nik” Chien, who joins us as a visiting scientist and scholar for the fall semester. Chien explores computational intelligence and experience design as a means to stimulate human creativity. She is working, and planning to continue the investigation while visiting ATLAS, on applying machine learning AI...

anthony pinter

ATLAS welcomes Anthony Pinter—a data scientist whose specialty is love

Aug. 19, 2022

The ATLAS Institute is delighted to welcome Anthony Pinter to the CU Boulder faculty this fall as a teaching assistant professor. He teaches courses on web development, computational thinking and programming, focusing on how data represents us, our lives and the worlds around us. His research focuses on understanding the...

Teenage woman holding her cell phone

Annie Margaret interviewed about the role of social media in teen self esteem

Aug. 5, 2022

Watch Teaching Assistant Professor Annie Margaret talk about social media's role in teen self esteem in this webinar by Forward Together, an organization that develops resources for parent-to-youth and youth-to-youth communication and relationship building.

Experimental Weaving Residency call for entries

Unstable Design Lab announces open call for third experimental weaving residency

Aug. 4, 2022

ATLAS Institute's Unstable Design Lab, directed by Laura Devendorf, will host its third experimental weaving residency this spring to develop techniques and open-source resources that support collaboration and innovation across the fiber arts and engineering communities. New this year, the lab will actively work to grow community at the intersection of craft and technology through inviting interested parties to attend a series of experimental weaving talks.

two cardboard tinycades side by side

How to turn throwaway cardboard into a DIY arcade game

July 22, 2022

Like many people across Colorado, Peter Gyory spent the height of the COVID-19 pandemic sitting at home with nothing to do. Then the ATLAS-based PhD candidate and game designer looked around his apartment: “I was surrounded by cardboard. I thought: ‘How could I make a game out of that?’”

The four projects presented by ATLAS at DIS'22

ATLAS research front and center at DIS’22

June 29, 2022

Researchers from ATLAS Institute's Unstable Design, THING, Living Matter and Superhuman Computing labs presented four papers, including three that received “Honorable Mention” awards, at the ACM conference on Designing Interactive Systems (DIS '22).

3D rendition of character from the typeface Zapf Dingbats

Asemics Magazine: Report from Joel E. Swanson

June 28, 2022

In May 2022, Asemics Magazine published a "Report from Joel E. Swanson," in which Swanson reports on two projects that are visually quite distinct, while both include the representation of linguistic characters and provoke thoughtful reflection on the ways we use language.

An arm with illustrations added of different emotions, symbolizing the emotional effect of touch.

DIS'22: Exploring how designers approach emotional robotic touch

June 22, 2022

Prior psychology findings show humans can communicate distinct emotions solely through touch. In this award-winning work presented at DIS'22, THING Lab researchers hypothesize that similar effects might also be apply to robotic touch.

Pages