Toolkit made from cardboard to foster children’s data visualization literacy

ACM C&C'22: Toward a Deeper Understanding of Data and Materiality 

June 20, 2022

In this paper, ATLAS PhD student Sandra Bae discusses the current challenges of data physicalization and addresses three areas where data physicalization can aid other research thrusts: broadening participation, supporting analytics and promoting creative expression. The paper exemplifies each approach through the lens of the author’s work.

Two hands  playing on tinycade cardboard consoles

ACM C&C'22: Build Your Own Arcade Machine with Tinycade

June 20, 2022

Tinycade is a platform designed to help game designers build their own mini arcade games by hand. With this platform, one can craft functioning game controllers out of everyday materials such as cardboard and toothpicks. In this pictorial, the authors discuss the functionality of Tinycade and showcase three games that demonstrate the variety of controls possible with this platform.

Shanel Wu

Shanel Wu chosen as OSHWA Open Hardware Trailblazer Fellow

June 16, 2022

ATLAS PhD Candidate Shanel Wu (they/them) recently was awarded a $50,000 Open Source Hardware Association (OSHWA) Traiblazer Fellowship. Wu, a member of Assistant Professor Laura Devendorf's Unstable Design Lab, will use the fellowship to support their dissertation project, making open hardware interfaces for the loom and using that as a case study to explore issues of doing open hardware in academia.

Joel Swanson

Joel Swanson's Lisbon residency: The Distance Between Words

May 18, 2022

While participating in an art residency in Lisbon, ATLAS Assistant Professor Joel Swanson is working on a new body of work, “The Distance Between Words,” which explores the various ways to measure the distance within texts: physically, semantically and durationally. Sponsored through Hangar: Centro de Investigação Artistica, an artistic research...

Robot turns to person entering the conversational group, even though she is not wearing a detectable hat like the other three members of the group.

ATLAS researchers' algorithm helps robots detect everyone in social gatherings

April 6, 2022

Imagine a world where robots flawlessly detect everyone in a conversation group and also greet the newcomers. Described in a paper published in the March proceedings of the prestigious International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI '22), Hooman Hedayati (PhD computer science '20) and Daniel Szafir, assistant professor of computer science at UNC Chapel Hill and former ATLAS faculty member, proposed a method to overcome situations when conversational group (F-formation) detection algorithms fail.

Museum volunteer, "Charlotte" poses by Andrea Fautheree Márquez's exhibit.

Andrea Fautheree Márquez's project featured in Museum of Boulder's Voces Vivas

March 22, 2022

Museum of Boulder’s new exhibit, Voces Vivas: Stories from the Latino Community in Boulder County, Past and Present features Andrea Fautheree Márquez's thesis project, "Chicana Light," which explores the Chicano civil rights movement in Colorado.

Logan Turner

Logan Turner, CTD major, one of six chosen for Student Leader of the Year Award

Feb. 21, 2022

Person at podium delivering a speech to an audience at the three-minute thesis competition

Varsha Koushik takes first place and Anthony Pinter is a runner-up in Three-Minute Thesis Contest

Feb. 21, 2022

Varsha Koushik, an ATLAS affiliated PhD student and a member of the Superhuman Computing Lab, won the Three-Minute Thesis Competition. Anthony Pinter, an incoming teaching assistant professor (starting fall 2022) in the ATLAS Institute and a PhD candidate in information science at the University of Colorado Boulder, was a runner-up.

Wayne Seltzer helps someone at a fix-it clinic

Wayne Seltzer: Part of the global fix-it movement

Feb. 16, 2022

Wayne Seltzer started his own repair business when he was in the eighth grade; now a retired engineer, he's part of the global fix-it movement.

Anthony Pinter

Anthony Pinter researches ways to make algorithms more sensitive to humans

Feb. 9, 2022

Did you just see a Facebook “memory” of you and your ex from Valentine’s Day…three years ago, and now you’re bummed or just annoyed? You can blame the algorithms, says Anthony Pinter, a doctoral student in CU Boulder’s information science department, and soon-to-be ATLAS Institute faculty member. Pinter studies ways to make algorithms, which work behind the scenes to make social media platforms work, more sensitive to us as humans, rather than just data leveragers

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