Students working with biochips during the workshop organized by the Living Matter Lab at ATLAS Institute.

Engaging Underrepresented Students (funded through Google exploreCSR)

This project aims to engage under-represented undergraduate students in the Living Matter Lab's research through a series of online workshops and hands-on sessions, as well as guides participants through finding good graduate programs and the application process.

Illustration of a researcher looking through a microscope and seeing in her head people and  DNA strands.

Healthcare at Home

June 17, 2020

Mirela Alistar, assistant professor of computer science and the director of the ATLAS Institute’s Living Matter Lab, wants to make healthcare more personal with microfluidic biochips.

2020 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems logo

ATLAS research helps define the future of human-computer interaction

May 1, 2020

At a time when the field of human-computer interaction is becoming more important than ever, ATLAS researchers are making substantial contributions, contributing nine papers and two workshops to CHI '20.

Mirela Alistar talks to students in her Personal Biochips class.

Living Matter Lab pioneers technologies that move medical diagnostics from lab to home

Nov. 18, 2019

Making healthcare more affordable, effective and personal is one of the greatest challenges of our time. Directed by Assistant Professor Mirela Alistar, the Living Matter Lab is rising to that challenge.

Person using a tablet to control droplets on the OpenDrop biochip

Microfluidic class introduces technology that brings healthcare home

June 11, 2019

A new approach to microfluidics holds promise for home diagnostics and other applications.

DNA strands

Can you inscribe human nostalgia onto foreign DNA? (blog)

April 30, 2019

Mirela Alistar, assistant professor at the ATLAS Institute, developed an algorithm to translate the story of a women's memory into a DNA sequence. Preserving information through encoding and decoding binary data to and from synthesized DNA strands holds the promise of putting huge amounts of information into tiny molecules.