Keith Ulmer Portrait
Assistant Professor
Physics
(303) 492-8162

Office: DUAN F323

Research Interests

My research is in the field of experimental elementary particle physics, which explores the fundamental constituents of matter and their interactions. I work on the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the CERN laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland. The LHC represents the Energy Frontier of particle physics by providing very high energy proton-proton collisions, which are recorded and analyzed to study fundamental interactions. My current effort is focused on searches for evidence of physics beyond the standard model of particle physics motivated by a potential new symmetry of nature known as supersymmetry, which may help explain such fundamental questions as the nature of dark matter and the origin of electroweak symmetry breaking. My group is also active in research and development for future upgrades of the CMS detector with a focus on very high-speed electronics to select and record the most interesting particle collision events.

Selected Publications

  1. CMS Collaboration, "Search for supersymmetry in multijet events with missing transverse momentum in proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV," Phys. Rev. D 96 , 032003 (2017) [arXiv:1704.07781].
  2. CMS and LHCb Collaborations, "Observation of the rare B0s -> mu+mu- decay from the combined analysis of CMS and LHCb data," Nature 522 , 68 (2015) [arXiv:1411.4413].
  3. CMS Collaboration, "Searches for electroweak neutralino and chargino production in channels with Higgs, Z , and W  bosons in pp collisions at 8 TeV," Phys. Rev. D 90, 092007 (2014) [arXiv:1409.3168].
  4. CMS Collaboration, "Search for supersymmetry in events with b-quark jets and missing transverse energy in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7TeV," Phys. Rev. D 86 , 072010 (2012) [arXiv:1208.4859].
  5. BABAR Collaboration, "Observation of CP violation in B0 -> eta'K0 decays," Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 , 031801 (2007) [arXiv:hep-ex/0609052].