All Herbst classes count toward the Humanities and Social Sciences requirements in the College of Engineering and Applied Science. Note that all courses, with the exception of study abroad, are restricted to students in the College of Engineering & Applied Science.

Current & Upcoming Course Schedules

Spring 2020 courses can be found on the course catalog.

Course Section Name Day Time Instructor Location
ENES 1010 001 Engineering, Ethics & Society MWF 10:00-10:50 Fredricksmeyer ECCR 1B06
ENES 1010 002 Engineering, Ethics & Society MWF 11:00-11:50 Fredricksmeyer ECCR 1B06
ENES 1010 003 Engineering, Ethics & Society MWF 11:00-11:50 Stanford-McIntyre KCEN S161
ENES 1010 004 Engineering, Ethics & Society MWF 1:00-1:50 Lange LESS 1B01
ENES 1010 005 Engineering, Ethics & Society MWF 2:00-2:50 Priou

LESS 1B01

ENES 1010 006 Engineering, Ethics & Society TTH 9:30-10:45 Kowalchuk ECCR 1B06
ENES 1010 007 Engineering, Ethics & Society TTH 9:30-10:45 de Alwis LESS 1B01
ENES 1010 008 Engineering, Ethics & Society TTH 11:00-12:15 de Alwis LESS 1B01
ENES 1010 009 Engineering, Ethics & Society TTH 11:00-12:15 Giovannelli ECCR 1B06
ENES 1010 010 Engineering, Ethics & Society TTH 12:30-1:45 Turner LESS 1B01
ENES 1010 012 Engineering, Ethics & Society MWF 2:00-3:15 Turner LESS 1B01
ENES 1010 800 Engineering, Ethics & Society for International Students MWF 11:00-11:50 Axel LESS 1B01
ENES 1010 801 Engineering, Ethics & Society for International Students MWF 3:00-3:50 Priou LESS 1B01

ENES 2360 / 3360

001 A Global State of Mind TTH 2:00-3:15 Giovannelli TBA
ENES 3100 001 EES Seminar MWF 9:00-9:50 Priou ECCR 1B06
ENES 3100 002 EES Seminar MWF 9:00-9:50 Lange LESS 1B01
ENES 3100 003 EES Seminar MWF 10:00-10:50 Lange LESS 1B01
ENES 3100 004 EES Seminar MWF 1:00-1:50 Fredricksmeyer ECCR 1B06
ENES 3100 005 EES Seminar MWF 2:00-2:50 Diduch ECCR 1B06
ENES 3100 006 EES Seminar MW 3:00-4:15 Diduch ECCR 1B06
ENES 3100 007 EES Seminar TTH 12:30-1:45 Kowalchuk ECCR 1B06
ENES 3100 008 EES Seminar TTH 2:00-3:15 Kowalchuk ECCR 1B06
ENES 3430 001 Ethics of Genetic Engineering TTH 12:30-1:45 Wilkerson TBA
ENES 3843 580R Special Topics: Don Quixote's Virtual Worlds (for Global RAP students only) TTH TBA Sieber TBA
ENES 3843 001 Special Topics: Science & Religion MWF 9:00-9:50 Diduch TBA
ENES 3843 002 Special Topics: Comics & Graphic Novels TTH 9:30-10:45 Kuskin TBA
ENES 3843 003 Special Topics: Fueling History: Oil to Atoms MWF 10:00-10:50 Stanford-McIntyre TBA

Summer 2019 courses can be found in the course catalog at http://classes.colorado.edu/?camp=BLDR&srcdb=2194&subject=HUEN

Course Section Name Day Time Instructor Location

HUEN 1010 Maymester

001 Humanities for Engineers MTWRF 9:00-12:00 Axel ECCR 110
HUEN 1010 Maymester 002 Humanities for Engineers MTWRF 12:30-3:30 Brooks ECCR 1B06

HUEN 3100 Maymester

001 Advanced Humanities for Engineers MTWRF 9:00-12:00 Kowalchuk ECCR 211
HUEN 3100 Maymester 002 Advanced Humanities for Engineers MTWRF 9:00-12:00 Douglass ECCR 1B06
HUEN 3700 Maymester 800 Study Abroad: Culture Wars in Rome     Diduch  

HUEN 3720 Maymester

800 Study Abroad: Voices of Vienna     de Alwis  
HUEN 3750 Maymester 800 Study Abroad: Xi'an, China     Lange  
HUEN 3100 A-Session 100 Advanced Humanities for Engineers MTWRF 11:00-12:35 Fredricksmeyer ECCR 1B06
HUEN 3100 Augmester 200 Advanced Humanities for Engineers MTWRF 9:00-12:00 Diduch ECCR 1B06

Fall 2019 courses can be found on the course catalog at http://classes.colorado.edu/?camp=BLDR&srcdb=2197&subject=HUEN

Course Section Name Day Time Instructor Location
HUEN 1010 001 Humanities for Engineers - Reading Ruins MWF 10:00-10:50 Rowe LESS 1B01
HUEN 1010 002 Humanities for Engineers - Reading Ruins MWF 11:00-11:50 Rowe LESS 1B01
HUEN 1010 003 Humanities for Engineers - The Human Condition MWF 1:00-1:50 Priou LESS 1B01
HUEN 1010 004 Humanities for Engineers - Intro to Moral Psychology MWF 2:00-2:50 Diduch LESS 1B01
HUEN 1010 005 Humanities for Engineers - Intro to Moral Psychology MW 3:00-4:15 Diduch LESS 1B01
HUEN 1010 006 Humanities for Engineers - Love, Cruelty, & Self-Deception TTh 9:30-10:45 Kowalchuk ECCR 1B06
HUEN 1010 007 Humanities for Engineers - Roots of Individualism TTh 9:30-10:45 de Alwis LESS 1B01
HUEN 1010 008 Humanities for Engineers - Roots of Individualism TTh 11:00-12:15 de Alwis LESS 1B01
HUEN 1010 009 Humanities for Engineers - The Human Condition TTh 12:30-1:45 Turner LESS 1B01
HUEN 1010 010 Humanities for Engineers - The Human Condition TTh 2:00-3:15 Turner LESS 1B01
HUEN 1010 011 Humanities for Engineers - Fueling History: Oil to Atoms MWF 11:00-11:50 Stanford-McIntyre KCEN S161
HUEN 1010 800 Humanities for Engineers - For International Students MWF 9:00-9:50 Axel LESS 1B01
HUEN 1010 801 Humanities for Engineers - For International Students MWF 11:00-11:50 Axel ECCR 1B06
FYSM 1000 040 First-Year Seminar - Heroism: Iliad to Bladerunner MWF 11:00-11:50 Fredricksmeyer KTCH 1B84
FYSM 1200 002 First-Year Global Experience- Designing the Renaissance TTh 9:30-10:45 Lange MUEN E114
HUEN 2020 580R Meaning of IT (for Global RAP students only) TTh 11:00-12:15 Sieber KCEN N101
HUEN 2020 581R Meaning of IT (for Global RAP students only) TTh 2:00-3:15 Sieber KCEN N101
HUEN 2020 582R Meaning of IT (for Global RAP students only) TTh 3:30-4:45 Sieber KCEN N101
HUEN 2210 001 Engineering, Science, & Society MWF 9:00-9:50 Diduch DUAN G131
HUEN 3843 003 Special Topics: Engineering, Science, & Society (cross-listed with HUEN 2210) MWF 9:00-9:50 Diduch DUAN G131
HUEN 2843 001 Special Topics: Women & Engineering TTh 2:00-3:15 Giovannelli KCEN S163
HUEN 3843 002 Special Topics: Women & Engineering (cross-listed with HUEN 2843) TTh 2:00-3:15 Giovannelli KCEN S163
HUEN 3100 001 Advanced Humanities for Engineers MWF 9:00-9:50 Priou ECCR 1B06
HUEN 3100 002 Advanced Humanities for Engineers MWF 10:00-10:50 Fredricksmeyer CHEM 146
HUEN 3100 003 Advanced Humanities for Engineers MWF 1:00-1:50 Lange ECCR 1B06
HUEN 3100 004 Advanced Humanities for Engineers MWF 2:00-2:50 Lange ECCR 1B06
HUEN 3100 005 Advanced Humanities for Engineers MWF 3:00-3:50 Priou ECCR 1B06
HUEN 3100 006 Advanced Humanities for Engineers TTh 11:00-12:15 Giovannelli ECCR 1B06
HUEN 3100 007 Advanced Humanities for Engineers TTh 12:30-1:45 Kowalchuk ECCR 1B06
HUEN 3100 008 Advanced Humanities for Engineers TTh 2:00-3:15 Kowalchuk ECCR 1B06

Complete List of Herbst Courses

For full course descriptions, see the current University CatalogPlease note that in Spring 2020, the HUEN course prefix will change to ENES to reflect the new Program name.

  • HUEN 1010. Humanities for Engineers (see topic descriptions below)
  • HUEN 1843. Special Topics
  • HUEN 1850. Engineering in History: The Social Impact of Technology
  • HUEN 2010. Tradition and Identity
  • HUEN 2020. The Meaning of Information Technology
  • HUEN 2100. History of Science and Technology to Newton
  • HUEN 2120. History of Modern Science from Newton to Einstein
  • HUEN 2130. History of Modern Technology from 1750 to the Atomic Bomb
  • HUEN 2210. Engineering, Science, and Society
  • HUEN 2360. A Global State of Mind
  • HUEN 2843. Special Topics (see current topic descriptions below)
  • HUEN 3100. Advanced Humanities for Engineers
  • HUEN 3350. Gods, Heroes, and Engineers
  • HUEN 3430. Ethics of Genetic Engineering
  • HUEN 3700. Global Seminar - Culture Wars in Rome
  • HUEN 3720. Global Seminar - Voices of Vienna: Mozart, Freud, & Wittgenstein
  • HUEN 3750. Global Seminar - Xi'an, China: Self-Awareness and Images of the Other
  • HUEN 3840. Independent Study
  • HUEN 3843. Special Topics (see current topic descriptions below)
  • HUEN 4830. Special Topics (see current topic description below)

HUEN 1010 Topic Descriptions:

  • Intro to Moral Psychology. More and more students of human behavior are looking to moral psychology for explanations of things like motivation, choice, happiness, and meaning.  This course will introduce the tradition of moral psychology by surveying key thinkers, ancient and modern.
  • Heroism: Troy to Mars.  This course views the humanities through three related units, each of which combines a film with literature from antiquity to the present: (1) Crime and Punishment, (2) Prometheus and Technology, and (3) War and the Human Psyche.  The first unit concerns the relationship between human action and responsibility, a topic of fascination since Oedipus the King and enriched in recent years by discoveries in neuroscience and biology.  The second unit addresses mankind's long-standing concerns about technology, as seen in the ancient myth of Prometheus and given new urgency by such emerging technologies as "automated weapons systems," that attempt to duplicate moral decision-making through algorithms.  The third unit addresses warfare as a phenomenon that brings out the best and worst in human beings, from Achilles in the Iliad to modern warriors.
  • Love, Cruelty, & Self-Deception.  This class will look, closely and primarily, at the thought and influence of Fyodor Dostoevsky, the great Russian novelist, to examine his profound understanding of human psychology.  We will also consider his, and others', understanding of how our psychology informs our human relationships, our deepest beliefs, our traditions, and our political aspirations and ideologies.
  • Science and Self-Knowledge.   If anything suggests that science has a horizon, that what science can make and do is somewhere limited, it is the human self.  Formed as we are by particular circumstances irretrievably lost to time, we seem fated, tragically, never to know who we are.  Yet, if we could reduce human nature to such formulae as we find in physics, would we not cease to be surprising and remarkable—would we still be interesting, worthy of study?  Would we even be recognizably human, and would not this loss of humanity be the real tragedy?  On the contrary, it seems that what makes you you refuses to bend to mathematics and method but rather stands alone, irreducibly itself.  I’ll be exploring these questions using works by Foucault, Plato, Descartes, Freud, and Woody Allen.
  • Designing the Renaissance.  This course is an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the intellectual dynamics of the Northern European and Italian Renaissance, a time when intellectuals valued the power of reason, when mathematical perspective was invented, artistic techniques became more sophisticated, and immense cathedrals were dominating the skylines of cities.  Learn about Leonardo Da Vinci, Michelangelo, and other great artists, architects, and engineers.  Study the artworks of Hieronymus Bosch, Botticelli, Caravaggio, and Gentileschi.  Dive into the depth of the human soul by reading Dante and Machiavelli.
  • Roots of Individualism.  What does it mean to be an individual?  What is enlightenment?  Working with art and music as well as philosophy and literature from various periods in history, we build a working knowledge of the fundamental principles of Enlightenment, and explore its links to individualism.  These can manifest themselves in unusual ways: for example, in the very structure of a musical work, or in the ways that artists and composers try to elevate their audiences.  We seek to understand the influence of Enlightenment principles on us personally, on the foundation and history of our country, and on today's world.
  • The Human Condition.  What does it mean to be a human being?  What is justice?  What is anger, and what do we learn from it?  What are honor and nobility?  What is happiness?  Can we attain it?  If so, how?  In this section, you will pursue such questions through studying great works of the classical tradition in philosophy, literature, poetry, and the arts.
  • Fueling History: Oil to Atoms.  Human energy use is at an all-time high, and many scientists give dire warnings about the future.  How did we get to this point?  This class answers that question by tracking human energy use around the world and across time.  Major themes will include the links between the fossil fuel era and Euro-colonial empires, oil and war in the Middle East, renewable energy options, and the climate change dilemma.
  • Final Frontiers.  This course explores understanding of the frontier in film, thought, and culture.  Topics include westward expansion, the western genre, the space race, and digital frontiers.
  • For International Students.  Sections 800 and 801 are designed for students who are English Language Learners.  To be eligible for these sections, you must be a non-native speaker of English who wants to devote extra attention to your English skills.  Reading assignments will be discussed in each class meeting, and writing assignments are due every week.  Students are required to meet with the instructor outside of class every week and to attend occasional workshops.  If you are eligible for this course and wish to enroll, please email herbst@colorado.edu for special permission.

HUEN 2843 Topic Description:

  • Women & Engineering.  How are women shaping the future of engineering - and the future of engineering education?  How have women shaped technology in the past?  This course is open to all CEAS students who want to explore these questions.  Several CEAS engineering professors will guest-lecture, describing their own trajectories as women in engineering.  Their stories will inspire you to reach your own goals, whoever you are!

HUEN 3843 Topic Descriptions:

  • Women & Engineering.  See HUEN 2843 above.
  • Don Quixote's Virtual Worlds.  (For Global RAP Students only.)
  • Science & Religion.  This course asks the difficult questions that most people are afraid to talk about.  An open mind is your only requirement.  We'll read great works in philosophy and theology to see how others have addressed these questions, and we'll use those as a springboard for our own discussions.
  • Comics & Graphic Novels.  The best comics so skillfully unite plot, image, and character that they demonstrate that comics are not just escapist entertainment.  By studying comics in social context, this course will reveal much about the contradictory landscape of American entertainment - and even of our own beliefs.
  • Fueling History: Oil to Atoms.  Human energy use is at an all-time high, and many scientists give dire warnings about the future.  How did we get to this point?  This class answers that question by tracking human energy use around the world and across time.  Major themes will include the links between the fossil fuel era and Euro-colonial empires, oil and war in the Middle East, renewable energy options, and the climate change dilemma