All Herbst classes count toward the Humanities and Social Sciences requirements in the College of Engineering and Applied Science. Note that all courses, with the exception of Global Seminars, are restricted to students in the College of Engineering & Applied Science.

Current & Upcoming Course Schedules

Spring 2021 courses can be found on the course catalog.

Course Section Name Day Time Instructor Location
ENES 1010 001 Engineering, Ethics & Society MWF 9:10-10:00 Lange

MW - FLMG 154

F - Remote

ENES 1010 002 Engineering, Ethics & Society MWF 10:20-11:10 Fredricksmeyer Remote
ENES 1010 003 Engineering, Ethics & Society MWF 10:20-11:10 Stanford-McIntyre FLMG 154
ENES 1010 004 Engineering, Ethics & Society MWF 11:30-12:20 Fredricksmeyer Remote
ENES 1010 005 Engineering, Ethics & Society MWF 11:30-12:20 Stanford-McIntyre FLMG 154
ENES 1010 006 Engineering, Ethics & Society MWF 3:00-3:50 Diduch FLMG 154
ENES 1010 007 Engineering, Ethics & Society MW 4:10-5:25 Diduch FLMG 154
ENES 1010 008 Engineering, Ethics & Society MWF 4:10-5:00 Priou ECCR 245
ENES 1010 009 Engineering, Ethics & Society TTH 9:35-10:50 Kowalchuk

T - MUEN E432

TH - Remote

ENES 1010 010 Engineering, Ethics & Society TTH 11:10-12:25 Diduch Remote
ENES 1010 011 Engineering, Ethics & Society TTH 11:10-12:25 Priou ECCR 135
ENES 1010 012 Engineering, Ethics & Society TTH 12:45-2:00 Sylvester Remote
ENES 1010 013 Engineering, Ethics & Society TTH 2:20-3:35 Priou ECCR 135
ENES 1010 800 Engineering, Ethics & Society for International Students MWF 9:10-10:00 Giovannelli Remote
ENES 1010 801 Engineering, Ethics & Society for International Students MWF 11:30-12:20 Giovannelli Remote

ENES 2360 / ENES 3360

001 A Global State of Mind TTH 11:10-12:25 Giovannelli Remote
ENES 3100 001 EES Seminar MWF 9:10-10:00 Priou FLMG 156
ENES 3100 002 EES Seminar MWF 10:20-11:10 Diduch FLMG 156
ENES 3100 003 EES Seminar MWF 1:50-2:40 Fredricksmeyer Remote
ENES 3100 004 EES Seminar MWF 1:50-2:40 Lange

MW - FLMG 157

F - Remote

ENES 3100 005 EES Seminar MWF 3:00-3:50 Lange

MW - FLMG 156

F- Remote

ENES 3100 006 EES Seminar TTH 12:45-2:00 Kowalchuk

T - ECCR 135

TH - Remote

ENES 3100 007 EES Seminar TTH 2:20-3:35 Kowalchuk Remote
ENES 3430 001 Ethics of Genetic Engineering TTH 12:45-2:00 Wilkerson Remote
ENES 3843 001 Special Topics: Game Design for Higher Ed TTH 2:20-3:35 Sieber Remote
ENES 3843 002 Special Topics: Comics & Graphic Novels TTH 12:45-2:00 Kuskin Remote

Summer 2021 courses can be found in the course catalog at http://classes.colorado.edu/?camp=BLDR&srcdb=2214&subject=ENES

Course Section Name Day Time Instructor Location

ENES 1010 Maymester

001 Engineering, Ethics & Society MTWRF 9:00-12:00 Lange REMOTE
ENES 1010 Maymester 002 Engineering, Ethics & Society MTWRF 12:30-3:30 Priou REMOTE

ENES 3100 Maymester

001 EES Seminar MTWRF 9:00-12:00 Diduch ECCR 245
ENES 3100 Maymester 002 EES Seminar MTWRF 12:30-3:30 Kowalchuk REMOTE
ENES 3843 Maymester 001 Special Topics: Humanities & Medicine MTWRF 9:00-12:00 Douglass and Kissler ECCR 1B40

ENES 3843 Maymester

002 Special Topics: Humanities & Medicine MTWRF 9:00-12:00 Douglass and Kissler REMOTE
ENES 3100 A-Session 100 Advanced Humanities for Engineers MTWRF 11:00-12:35 Fredricksmeyer REMOTE
ENES 3100 Augmester 200 Advanced Humanities for Engineers MTWRF 9:00-12:00 Diduch ECCR 245

Fall 2021 courses can be found on the course catalog at http://classes.colorado.edu/?camp=BLDR&srcdb=2217&subject=ENES

Course Section Name Day Time Instructor Location
ENES 1010 001 Engineering, Ethics & Society MWF 9:10-10:00 Lange ECCR 1B06
ENES 1010 002 Engineering, Ethics & Society MWF 10:20-11:10 Fredricksmeyer ECCR 1B06
ENES 1010 003 Engineering, Ethics & Society MWF 11:30-12:20 Fredricksmeyer ECCR 1B06
ENES 1010 004 Engineering, Ethics & Society MWF 11:30-12:20 Diduch LESS 1B01
ENES 1010 005 Engineering, Ethics & Society MWF 1:50-2:40 Sieber LESS 1B01
ENES 1010 006 Engineering, Ethics & Society MWF 3:00-3:50 Diduch LESS 1B01
ENES 1010 007 Engineering, Ethics & Society MW 4:10-5:25 Diduch LESS 1B01
ENES 1010 008 Engineering, Ethics & Society MWF 4:10-5:00 Priou ECCR 1B06
ENES 1010 009 Engineering, Ethics & Society TTh 9:35-10:50 Kowalchuk LESS 1B01
ENES 1010 010 Engineering, Ethics & Society TTh 9:35-10:50 Stanford-McIntyre TBD
ENES 1010 011 Engineering, Ethics & Society TTh 11:10-12:25 Turner ECCR 1B06
ENES 1010 012 Engineering, Ethics & Society TTh 11:10-12:25 Stanford-McIntyre TBD
ENES 1010 013 Engineering, Ethics & Society TTh 11:10-12:25 de Alwis LESS 1B01
ENES 1010 014 Engineering, Ethics & Society TTh 12:45-2:00 Sylvester LESS 1B01
ENES 1010 015 Engineering, Ethics & Society TTh 2:20-3:35 Priou LESS 1B01
ENES 1010 800 Engineering, Ethics & Society - For International Students MWF 9:10-10:00 Giovannelli REMOTE
ENES 1010 801 Engineering, Ethics & Society - For International Students MWF 11:30-12:20 Giovannelli REMOTE
ENES 2120 001 History of Modern Science from Newton to Einstein TTh 2:20-3:35 Giovannelli REMOTE
ENES 3843 001 History of Modern Science (combined with ENES 2120) TTh 2:20-3:35 Giovannelli REMOTE
ENES 2210 001 Modern Science & Technological Society MWF 9:10-10:00 Diduch TBD
ENES 3843 002 Modern Science & Technological Society (combined with ENES 2210) MWF 9:10-10:00 Diduch TBD
ENES 3100 001 EES Seminar MWF 10:20-11:10 Priou LESS 1B01
ENES 3100 002 EES Seminar MWF 1:50-2:40 Fredricksmeyer REMOTE
ENES 3100 003 EES Seminar MWF 1:50-2:40 Lange ECCR 1B06
ENES 3100 004 EES Seminar MWF 3:00-3:50 Lange ECCR 1B06
ENES 3100 005 EES Seminar TTh 9:35-10:50 Priou ECCR 1B06
ENES 3100 006 EES Seminar TTh 12:45-2:00 Kowalchuk ECCR 1B06
ENES 3100 007 EES Seminar TTh 2:20-3:35 Kowalchuk ECCR 1B06

Complete List of Herbst Courses

For full course descriptions, see the current University Catalog

  • ENES 1010. Engineering, Ethics & Society (see topic descriptions below)
  • ENES 1843. Special Topics
  • ENES 1850. Engineering in History: The Social Impact of Technology
  • ENES 2010. Tradition and Identity
  • ENES 2020. The Meaning of Information Technology
  • ENES 2100. History of Science and Technology to Newton
  • ENES 2120. History of Modern Science from Newton to Einstein
  • ENES 2130. History of Modern Technology from 1750 to the Atomic Bomb
  • ENES 2210. Modern Science and Technological Society
  • ENES 2360. A Global State of Mind
  • ENES 2843. Special Topics (see current topic descriptions below)
  • ENES 3100. Engineering, Ethics & Society Seminar
  • ENES 3280. Science and Religion
  • ENES 3350. Gods, Heroes, and Engineers
  • ENES 3430. Ethics of Genetic Engineering
  • ENES 3700. Global Seminar - Culture Wars in Rome
  • ENES 3750. Global Seminar - Xi'an, China: Self-Awareness and Images of the Other
  • ENES 3840. Independent Study
  • ENES 3843. Special Topics (see current topic descriptions below)
  • ENES 4830. Special Topics (see current topic description below)

ENES 1010 Topic Descriptions:

  • Intro to Moral Psychology. More and more students of human behavior are looking to moral psychology for explanations of things like motivation, choice, happiness, and meaning.  This course will introduce the tradition of moral psychology by surveying key thinkers, ancient and modern.
  • Heroism: Troy to Mars.  This course views the humanities through three related units, each of which combines a film with literature from antiquity to the present: (1) Crime and Punishment, (2) Prometheus and Technology, and (3) War and the Human Psyche.  The first unit concerns the relationship between human action and responsibility, a topic of fascination since Oedipus the King and enriched in recent years by discoveries in neuroscience and biology.  The second unit addresses mankind's long-standing concerns about technology, as seen in the ancient myth of Prometheus and given new urgency by such emerging technologies as "automated weapons systems," that attempt to duplicate moral decision-making through algorithms.  The third unit addresses warfare as a phenomenon that brings out the best and worst in human beings, from Achilles in the Iliad to modern warriors.
  • Love, Anger, & Self-Deception.  Many writers and artists have reflected deeply on human psychology, mirroring to us our fundamental longings: our capacity for self-deception and cruelty, our indignation at lack of acknowledgment or injustice, our hopes and confusions about love, our dependencies, strengths, and deficiencies.  In this class we will consider multiple expressions of these reflections and insights with an eye to learning more about ourselves.
  • The Hero and the Philosopher.  It was only recently in human history that the life of reason emerged as a human ideal, some 2500 years ago in Ancient Greece.  Prior to that, it was not the philosopher or scientist to whom human beings turned in search of guidance, but the hero, the human being whose strength and courage in battle could make into reality a people's greatest ambitions.  The shift in humankind's reverence from the hero to the philosopher was so extreme that it might be better described as a reversal.  But perhaps the two are closer than they appear.  In this course, we will examine the emergence of the life of reason as an ideal in Ancient Greek poetry and philosophy, to see to what extent, if at all, the hero and the philosopher overlap.  Readings include Homer's Iliad, Hesiod's Theogony and Works and Days, Plato's Republic (selections) and Apology of Socrates, and selections from Aristotle. 
  • Designing the Renaissance.  This course is an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the intellectual dynamics of the Northern European and Italian Renaissance, a time when intellectuals valued the power of reason, when mathematical perspective was invented, artistic techniques became more sophisticated, and immense cathedrals were dominating the skylines of cities.  Learn about Leonardo Da Vinci, Michelangelo, and other great artists, architects, and engineers.  Study the artworks of Hieronymus Bosch, Botticelli, Caravaggio, and Gentileschi.  Dive into the depth of the human soul by reading Dante and Machiavelli.
  • Kids in the Early Space Race.  This course covers the period from the launching of Sputnik through the first Apollo moon landing.  It will focus on how children and teenagers in America understood and responded to the advent of human space flight, what influences shaped their attitudes towards space travel and exploration, and how the dawning of the space age impacted their own senses of self and life possibilities.  Key identity factors (gender, social class, religion, race, ethnicity) will be considered, as will the broader political, social, economic, and cultural dynamics that marked the early space age as an era of change and possibility.
  • The Human Condition.  What does it mean to be a human being?  What is justice?  What is anger, and what do we learn from it?  What are honor and nobility?  What is happiness?  Can we attain it?  If so, how?  In this section, you will pursue such questions through studying great works of the classical tradition in philosophy, literature, poetry, and the arts.
  • Culture of Energy.  Human energy use is at an all-time high, and many scientists give dire warnings about the future.  How did we get to this point?  This class answers that question by tracking human energy use around the world and across time.  Major themes will include the links between the fossil fuel era and Euro-colonial empires, oil and war in the Middle East, renewable energy options, and the climate change dilemma.
  • Final Frontiers.  This course explores understanding of the frontier in film, thought, and culture.  Topics include westward expansion, the western genre, the space race, and digital frontiers.
  • Civilization and Barbarism.  The common understanding of civilization places it in stark opposition to barbarism.  In this course, we will examine what it is about civilization that allows for its collapse into barbarism -- that makes its collapse not only possible or probable, but perhaps even necessary.
  • The Origins of Modern Science.  Scientific inquiry is so much a feature of everyday life that it is difficult to envision what our world would be like without it.  What's more, our understanding of science as producing mathematical certainty about the physical world around us is entirely taken for granted.  But there was a time at which this was not the case; the first modern scientists had to justify the scientific enterprise before a different tribunal, one with concerns other than producing a mathematical physics.  In that justification, these first moderns had to articulate the pre-scientific desires or concerns that science was to address.  By looking carefully at the texts in which they justify their new science, we can better understand the underlying motivations driving the massive, vaguely unified enterprise we call "science."  Toward this end, we will read selections from Machiavelli, Bacon, and Descartes.
  • For International Students.  Sections 800 and 801 are designed for students who are English Language Learners.  To be eligible for these sections, you must be a non-native speaker of English who wants to devote extra attention to your English skills.  Reading assignments will be discussed in each class meeting, and writing assignments are due every week.  Students are required to meet with the instructor outside of class every week and to attend occasional workshops.  If you are eligible for this course and wish to enroll, please email herbst@colorado.edu for special permission.

HUEN 3843 Topic Descriptions:

  • Humanities & Medicine.  Co-taught by Herbst Professor Scot Douglass and Dr. Mark Kissler (CU Medical School faculty/University Hospital Physician), the course “Humanities & Medicine” explores the the stories we tell about disease and healing, the story that scientific clinical medicine tells about itself, and the practice of medicine.  It brings together Mark’s clinical experience with compelling narratives and theoretical frameworks to engage the rich topic of the role story plays in health, medicine, life and death.  For those considering a career in the health sciences, this course would provide a deeper and unique texture to your future school applications and professional experiences. This ENES 3843 course will be taught in Maymester 2021 as a live synchronous hybrid course—in-person (section 001) and simultaneously remote (section 002).  It is worth 3 upper division H&SS credits and open to all students. If you want to take the course and have fewer than 57 credit hours, contact herbst@colorado.edu to be enrolled manually.  For more information, contact scot.douglass@colorado.edu.  
  • Science & Religion.  This course asks the difficult questions that most people are afraid to talk about.  An open mind is your only requirement.  We'll read great works in philosophy and theology to see how others have addressed these questions, and we'll use those as a springboard for our own discussions.
  • History of Modern Science from Newton to Einstein.  Surveys the great discoveries and theoretical disputes from Newtonian celestial mechanics to the theory of relativity.  Includes physics, astronomy, chemistry, geology, and biology; closely examines scientific method, evolution, light, and quantum theory.  Uses original sources by Newton, Faraday, Lavoisier, Darwin, etc., for immediate contact with the great minds in science.
  • Modern Science & Technological Society.  Explores challenges that engineering and science pose for society plus the ways that societies shape or impede science and engineering.  Case studies range from contemporary issues (global warming, nuclear weapons, and genetic engineering) to classic cases (the execution of Socrates).  Core texts in the Western Tradition supplement contemporary articles and films.
  • Comics & Graphic Novels.  The best comics so skillfully unite plot, image, and character that they demonstrate that comics are not just escapist entertainment.  By studying comics in social context, this course will reveal much about the contradictory landscape of American entertainment - and even of our own beliefs.
  • Fueling History: Oil to Atoms.  Human energy use is at an all-time high, and many scientists give dire warnings about the future.  How did we get to this point?  This class answers that question by tracking human energy use around the world and across time.  Major themes will include the links between the fossil fuel era and Euro-colonial empires, oil and war in the Middle East, renewable energy options, and the climate change dilemma
  • Kids in the Early Space Age.  This course covers the period from the launching of Sputnik through the first Apollo moon landing.  It will focus on how children and teenagers in America understood and responded to the advent of human space flight, what influences shaped their attitudes towards space travel and exploration, and how the dawning of the space age impacted their own senses of self and life possibilities.  Key identity factors (gender, social class, religion, race, ethnicity) will be considered, as will the broader political, social, economic, and cultural dynamics that marked the early space age as an era of change and possibility.