Researcher shoveling in the mountain snow

Monitoring changing world at CU Boulder’s Mountain Research Station

June 1, 2019

From base at 9,500 feet, scientists examine climate to top of tundra Motorists cruising the famed Peak to Peak Highway north of Nederland as they savor the scenery or head out for a visit to Brainard Lake might well sail right past a modest signpost for one of the highest...

Snow covered mountain scene

SNOTERNS Internship

April 16, 2019

The Undergrad Snow Internship Program has been hosting undergraduates at the CU Mountain Research Station for over 20 years and includes alumni like Jen Morse and Noah Molotch , who help run the program today. The long-term data collected through this program has helped drive published papers due to the...

Aerial view of CU Boulder campus with snow

Rain or snow? Humidity, location can make all the difference

March 23, 2018

By Trent Knoss , CU Boulder Today . CU Boulder researchers have created a map of the Northern Hemisphere showing how location and humidity can affect precipitation, illustrating wide variability in how and why different areas receive snow or rain. 32 degrees Fahrenheit is commonly considered to be the air...

Collage of students doing research in the snow-covered mountains

GEOG 4321 Snow Hydrology

Are you interested in the various processes related to snow in mid-latitude and polar areas? You will learn the physics and chemistry that underlie processes such as snow metamorphism, and apply this knowledge to real situations, including calculation of basin storage of water, runoff rates, acid snow, and avalanche dynamics...

Earlier snowmelt carries drastic consequences for forests

Aug. 3, 2016

Earlier snowmelt periods associated with a warming climate may hinder subalpine forest regulation of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), according to the results of a new University of Colorado Boulder study. The findings, which were recently published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters , predict that this shift in the timing...

CU-led mountain forest study shows vulnerability to climate change

Sept. 10, 2012

A new University of Colorado Boulder-led study that ties forest "greenness" in the western United States to fluctuating year-to-year snowpack indicates mid-elevation mountain ecosystems are most sensitive to rising temperatures and changes in precipitation and snowmelt. Led by CU-Boulder researcher Ernesto Trujillo and Assistant Professor Noah Molotch, the study team...