Dead animals in dry, desert-like terrain

John O'Loughlin: Evidence of climate-driven conflicts is piling up

Sept. 19, 2019

On a sweltering July afternoon in the remote village of Daaba in Northern Kenya, CU Boulder Geography Professor John O’Loughlin was stood up by a tribal chief. O’Loughlin and his colleagues had driven for hours along dusty roads in the drought-ravaged region to interview the local leader about if, and...

Residents collect drinking water from a municipal tanker in Kolkata, India

Professor John O’Loughlin's Article for the Washington Post

July 11, 2019

During last month’s U.S. Democratic presidential candidate debates, former congressman Beto O’Rourke, Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Cory Booker, and former housing and urban development secretary Julián Castro all identified climate change as a major geopolitical threat facing the United States. Some even gave it equal billing with China and the...

COP21 logo

John O'Loughlin adds to study showing climate change, conflict link

June 17, 2019

Imagine rising temperatures across the globe exacerbating armed conflicts in countries with limited resources. According to researchers and experts, including scientists from the University of Colorado Boulder and Stanford University, this scenario could easily become reality, rather than a plot for the next “Mad Max” film.

African woman standing in drought-affected area

Is climate change fueling civil war?

June 14, 2019

Droughts and other climate events can impact agriculture production and lead to economic shocks, which may increase risk of conflict. Credit: Oxfam East Africa Climate change has played a small, but important role in fueling civil wars and other armed conflicts in recent decades and will play an exponentially greater...

Geography Department featured in Colorado Arts and Sciences Magazine

April 27, 2017

"Encompassing South American wildfires, Arctic sea-ice retreat, post-Soviet politics, climate change in Tibet and GIS, CU Boulder geographers keep their fingers on the pulse of a changing world" A new article titled "This is not your junior-high geography" by CU's Clint Talbott featuring the Geography Department has been published in...

Here are the 5 things you need to know about the deadly fighting in Nagorno Karabakh

April 6, 2016

Between Armenia and Azerbaijan lies a contested territory controlled by an unrecognized state called the Nagorno-Karabakh Republic (NKR). In the early hours of April 2, violence exploded in this Armenian-supported statelet in the southern Caucasus. This festering conflict in former Soviet territory suddenly turned hot. Read Washington Post article by...

20 years after Dayton, here’s what Bosnians think about being divided by ethnicity

Feb. 2, 2016

Last November and December, a series of events and conferences marked the 20th anniversary of the Dayton Peace Accords of 1995, the negotiated agreement that ended the Bosnian war and devised a complex governance structure for the country. The Dayton agreement was not a democratic agreement. It was not even...

John O’Loughlin wins gold medal from Russian Geographical Society

Oct. 21, 2015

John O’Loughlin has become the first foreigner in more than 100 years to win the Semenov-Tyan-Shansky gold medal for research on Russia. It is the highest research award of the Russian Geographical Society typically targeted toward Russian and, previously, Soviet scholars working in the area of the former Soviet Union...

What people in southeast Ukraine really think of Novorossiya

May 25, 2015

Novorossiya is frozen. Last week Oleg Tsarev, leader of the ‘parliament’ that ostensibly united the eastern Ukraine separatist entities, the Donetsk Peoples Republic (DPR) and the Luhansk Peoples Republic (LPR), announced the project was now on hold. The reason Tsarev gave was that Novorossiya was incompatible with the Minsk II...

John O’Loughlin interviewed on CBC Radio

March 17, 2015

One year after Russia's Vladimir Putin pulled Crimea back under the purview of his government, polling data shows the majority of ethnic Ukrainians and Russians living there like this turn of events. So, was it an act of repression, or a welcome succession? Listen to The Current interview

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