CU researcher finds 10,000-year-old weapon

CU researcher finds 10,000-year-old weapon

June 21, 2010

To the untrained eye, University of Colorado at Boulder Research Associate Craig Lee’s recent discovery of a 10,000-year-old wooden hunting weapon might look like a small branch that blew off a tree in a windstorm.

From left to right, Ashley Ballantyne of the University of Colorado at Boulder, Dara Finney of Environment Canada and Natalia Rybczynski of the Canadian Museum of Nature search for fossils in a peat deposit at Strathcona Fiord on Ellesmere Island in Canada's High Arctic. Photo courtesy Dara Finney, Environment Canada.

Arctic might be more sensitive than previously thought

June 1, 2010

From left to right, Ashley Ballantyne of the University of Colorado at Boulder, Dara Finney of Environment Canada and Natalia Rybczynski of the Canadian Museum of Nature search for fossils in a peat deposit at Strathcona Fiord on Ellesmere Island in Canada's High Arctic. Photo courtesy Dara Finney, Environment Canada...

A mobile fish lab on Boulder Creek is helping researcher assess the health of fish exposed to endocrine-disrupting chemicals polluting the waterway that can cause male fish to be feminized and decline in numbers. Image courtesy Alan Vajda, University of Colorado Denver.

Gender-bending fish get break from Boulder plant

June 1, 2010

A mobile fish lab on Boulder Creek is helping researcher assess the health of fish exposed to endocrine-disrupting chemicals polluting the waterway that can cause male fish to be feminized and decline in numbers. Image courtesy Alan Vajda, University of Colorado Denver. Male fish are taking longer to be “feminized”...

Joan Schirle, teacher of movement and founding artistic director at Dell’ Arte International School of Physical Theater

Visiting artist conveys movement for actors

June 1, 2010

Joan Schirle lends expertise to CU Theatre The average Boulderite may not realize how his body movements speak volumes about demeanor, attitude or mood. Joan Schirle definitely does. While observing her workshop at the CU Theatre recently, I bore witness to how the movements of an actor can truly inform...

Only eight months after the tsunami, permanent houses had been provided for victims in the southern town of Hambantota, shown here, the home district of Sri Lanka's president. Tamils and Muslims on the eastern and northern coasts waited up to five years to obtain new housing. Photo credit: Michele R. Gamburd

After tsunami, Sri Lankan politics affected recovery

June 1, 2010

Only eight months after the tsunami, permanent houses had been provided for victims in the southern town of Hambantota, shown here, the home district of Sri Lanka's president. Tamils and Muslims on the eastern and northern coasts waited up to five years to obtain new housing. Photo credit: Michele R...

Mogul field at Riflesight Notch in Winter Park, Colorado. (Photo credit: David Bahr)

The magic motion of moguls

March 1, 2010

Gravity always wins, one might think. Avalanches roar and skiers plunge inexorably downhill. But moguls—or bumps, as they’re known by skiers—move uphill. Just ask lead researcher David Bahr, a Regis University professor and former CU geological sciences PhD student; Tad Pfeffer, a professor of civil, environment, and architectural engineering at...

Members of a community in Brazil gather to vote as part of a participatory program. While these programs may improve empowerment and accountability, they might not provide the overwhelming gains in well-being that many organizations are promoting.

Participatory budgeting no ‘magic bullet,’ study finds

March 1, 2010

Participatory governance is the darling of policymakers and world-organizations seeking to improve the well-being of the impoverished. The claim is that by increasing the citizens’ direct involvement with the decision-making process, the quality of their lives will improve. However, it may not bring about such dramatic changes and is no...

Michael Yarus, professor of molecular, cellular and developmental biology at the University of Colorado (Photo credit: Emily Krauter)

Tiny RNA molecule, big implications for origin of life

March 1, 2010

An extremely small RNA molecule created by a University of Colorado team can catalyze a key reaction needed to synthesize proteins, the building blocks of life. The findings could be a substantial step toward understanding “the very origin of Earthly life,” the lead researcher contends. The smallest RNA enzyme ever...

Cartoon of brain

A blue note on antidepressants

March 1, 2010

Study finds that, for many, drugs work no better than placebos, but resulting firestorm may have obscured nuances Newsweek heralded the “depressing news about antidepressants” and suggested that drugs like Prozac are “basically expensive Tic Tacs.” CNN also headlined the “startling news” and suggested that “antidepressants don’t work.” Commentators in...

Illustration of the NASA Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment, or GRACE. Image courtesy of NASA.

India’s big gulp raising sea level and concern

Dec. 1, 2009

Illustration of the NASA Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment, or GRACE. Image courtesy of NASA. Northern India’s groundwater is being pumped onto farm fields faster than it can be replenished by monsoons, and the rate of loss is accelerating, a recent study co-authored by a University of Colorado researcher has...

Pages