semi conductor technology

CU Boulder wins $1.5 million to advance semiconductor research

Feb. 3, 2023

The funding is part of a larger $32.7 million award to 14 colleges meant to improve the performance of emerging commercial and defense systems.

iPhone moon phases photo composite

Taking solar eclipse photos is a snap with gizmo astronomer developed

Jan. 25, 2023

Doug Duncan, former director of CU Boulder’s Fiske Planetarium, developed the Solar Snap with today’s smartphone cameras in mind.

A red female squirrel

Squirrels roll the dice on their offspring

Jan. 25, 2023

A collaborative study with a CU Boulder professor investigates how the risks and rewards of red squirrel reproduction is a microcosm of evolutionary patterns.

The Bill of Rights

Opening doors for a more robust exchange of ideas

Jan. 24, 2023

CU Boulder tapped for new network to promote positive culture change through viewpoint diversity, open inquiry, and constructive disagreement.

Researcher holding finch

Rosy-finches are Colorado’s high-alpine specialists, and researchers want to know why

Jan. 19, 2023

Birds that can live at 14,000 feet and also breed at sea level might have evolved more quickly than previously thought.

The flatirons covered in snow.

Dean’s Innovation Fund awards $317,896 in grants

Jan. 12, 2023

Inaugural group of proposals was ‘universally strong and worthy,’ Dean Glen Krutz notes.

congress solar

Why does climate policy lag science?

Jan. 12, 2023

Despite the Inflation Reduction Act, U.S. progress on climate change remains stuck in a climate conundrum, experts say, hampered by politics, complexity and the scope of the problem.

Jill Litt in a garden

Nature program helps reduce teenage loneliness, new study finds

Dec. 22, 2022

The MINT study program uses nature-based social intervention to address and dimmish loneliness with teenage parents and their peers.

Model of a human brain

What stress does to your brain, and what future remedies could look like

Dec. 15, 2022

Neuroscientists at CU Boulder have discovered that a specific type of brain cell could be a key player in making you feel the negative impacts of stress.

Hands behind a barbed wire fence

Wealthy democracies have looser immigration policies, researchers find

Dec. 14, 2022

Political scientist Adrian Shin and UCLA colleague find that rising levels of inequality have opposite effects on immigration policies in wealthy vs. developing economies.

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