Tanya

Expert to discuss God and local 'theory' of mind

Oct. 11, 2017

An expert on the American evangelical relationship with God will discuss her scholarly work this week on the University of Colorado Boulder campus.Read more »
Mesa Verde

Ancient DNA used to track abandonment of Mesa Verde in 13th century

Aug. 10, 2017

Ancient DNA used to track the exodus of Pueblo people from Colorado's Mesa Verde region in the late 13th century indicates many wound up in the northern Rio Grande area of New Mexico.Read more »
primate

Primate extinction looms, but hope remains, scientist says

May 1, 2017

The first question in conservation is whether to focus on conserving species or habitat. Anthropologist Joanna Lambert has proposed conservation tactics that focus on particular primate species.Read more »
anthropology

Anthropologist to discuss Commanche archaeology and plains warfare

Jan. 3, 2017

New archaeological findings have complicated the colonial history of the American Southwest, developments that anthropologist Severin Fowles will discuss in a public presentation on the University of Colorado Boulder campus this month.Read more »
Arctic

CU Boulder launches cool certificate in Arctic studies

Dec. 5, 2016

There probably is not a more suitable location for one of the world’s first interdisciplinary certificates in Arctic studies than the University of Colorado Boulder.Read more »
Lienzo de Petlalcala

CU scholars named American Council of Learned Societies fellows

Nov. 30, 2016

Three University of Colorado Boulder professors have won prestigious fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies. The three are among 69 fellows chosen from 1,100 applicants.Read more »
Scott Ortman

Ortman receives prize for book about Southwestern archaeology

June 14, 2016

Scott Ortman, assistant professor of archaeology, has been awarded the 2017 Linda S. Cordell Prize for his book, Winds from the North: Tewa Origins and Historical Archaeology.Read more »
What Rousseau didn’t know

What Rousseau didn’t know

Feb. 17, 2016

Economic inequality is a hot topic in a presidential election year. Economists, politicians and journalists are all weighing in — but what, exactly, can an archaeologist bring to the discussion? Sarah Kurnick, a Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow at CU-Boulder, is glad you asked.Read more »
the carcass of a dead animal lies next to the limestone quarry that borders the site of a 1970 trichloroethylene spill near Le Roy, Photographs by Donna Goldstein.

‘Hysteria’ theory short on science

Feb. 17, 2016

In 2011, 12 high-school girls in upstate New York began to exhibit strange neurological symptoms: tics, verbal outbursts, seizure-like activity and difficulty speaking. The diagnosis was “conversion disorder.”Read more »
A petroglyph of an eclipse is seen with a wide-angle lens in a photograph at Chaco Canyon, where CU-Boulder researchers captured a rare Aurora Borealis in the southern night sky. Photo courtesy of Fiske Planetarium.

A digital look at ancient skies gets a showing at Fiske

Feb. 17, 2016

Having captured the summer solstice and a week’s worth of sunsets, sunrises and their lunar equivalents from the vantage point of ancient Chacoan people in southwestern Colorado, using parabolic video technology, a multi-disciplinary team from the University of Colorado Boulder counted its June 2015 trip a success.Read more »

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