Sherri Tennant
Scholar in Residence
SLHS

C292

Sherri Tennant, M.S., CCC-SLP, is a clinical faculty member in the Speech Language Hearing Sciences Department at the University of Colorado-Boulder (CU). She has 22 years of experience as a speech- language pathologist (SLP) and augmentative-alternative communication (AAC) specialist in a variety of settings including public school systems, private practices, nonprofit rehabilitation clinics and in universities. Currently, in addition to her work at CU, she has private students who use AAC systems. She works with these students in their schools and at home to improve their communication and language-literacy skills. Sherri was an emergent literacy coach in the Jefferson County Public Schools for two years prior to becoming a clinical faculty member at CU. In that position, she managed a large literacy grant that involved in-district training by Dr. Karen Erickson and Dr. Penny Hatch from the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill. Sherri had a private AAC practice in New York City for nine years. Most of her students attended public schools in NYC and she worked with them, in addition to their school teams, to facilitate their inclusion in general education. Her primary focus in NYC was on the development and implementation of low and high tech picture-based communication systems for children who have motor limitations due to neurological disorders, such as cerebral palsy (CP) and Rett Syndrome. Before she moved to New York she worked at Assistive Technology Partners (ATP) at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center for three years in Denver. She earned her Master’s degree in Speech-Language Pathology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1993. She received AT training at the Trace and Waisman Centers in Madison as part of her graduate-level training. She also worked for two years as an SLP on The Menominee Indian Reservation in Wisconsin. In addition to the development and implementation of AAC systems, her special interests include literacy development and AAC, cultural diversity in education, especially bilingual issues, and implementation of music therapy strategies with children who use AAC.