laser heating ultra thin bars of silicon

Cool it: Nano-scale discovery could help prevent overheating in electronics

Sept. 29, 2021

A team of physicists at CU Boulder has solved the mystery behind a perplexing phenomenon in the nano realm: why some ultra-small heat sources cool down faster if you pack them closer together. The findings, which appeared recently in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), could one day help the tech industry design speedier electronic devices that overheat less.

Karan Dikshit

MSE Student Profile: Karan Dikshit

Sept. 29, 2021

Karan Dikshit is a fourth-year PhD candidate in the Materials Science and Engineering Program studying under Assistant Professor Carson Bruns in the Emergent Nanomaterials Lab. He is also affiliated with the Paul M. Rady Department of Mechanical Engineering and ATLAS. He is originally from Pune, India.

Solar panels

New leadership, faculty aim to develop CU Boulder as a leader in materials science and engineering

Sept. 22, 2021

With new leadership and several high-profile faculty joining the program, Materials Science and Engineering at CU Boulder is poised to build on past successes to grow into a world-class hub for research and education in the field.

Dylan McNally in suit with mountain in background

MSE Student Profile: Dylan McNally

Sept. 21, 2021

Dylan McNally is a second-year graduate student in the Materials Science and Engineering Program studying under Associate Professor Chunmei Ban in the Ban Surface Science and Engineering Research Group. He is originally from Loveland, Colorado.

IMOD logo with colored dots over blue background

CU Boulder faculty help launch Center for Integration of Modern Optoelectronic Materials on Demand

Sept. 14, 2021

CU Boulder is a founding partner of a major National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center (STC): the Center for Integration of Modern Optoelectronic Materials on Demand (IMOD). The center represents a research partnership spanning 11 universities led by the University of Washington.

United States Department of Energy logo featuring bald eagle head over shield featuring different energy sources

McGehee and Smalyukh draw DOE funding for building energy efficiency projects

Sept. 2, 2021

Professor Michael McGehee and Professor Ivan Smalyukh are the principal investigators on two Department of Energy-funded projects to improve building technologies and energy efficiency in the built environment. Their projects are among 44 nationwide research projects selected as part of the Building Technologies Office’s competitive Building Energy Efficiency Frontiers & Innovation Technologies funding program.

Stacked grey cement bricks

Carbon capture DOE-funded projects may lead to more durable concrete materials

Aug. 25, 2021

Assistant Professor Mija Hubler and Melvin E. and Virginia M. Clark Professor Al Weimer are collaborating on linked Department of Energy-funded projects to capture and repurpose carbon products from fuel sources into materials for concrete bricks. They hope to reduce pollution while also making stronger, more resilient building materials that require less maintenance and repairs over time.

Ivan Smalyukh in blue shirt

Smalyukh receives 2021 Langmuir Lectureship Award

July 29, 2021

Professor Ivan Smalyukh is one of the winners of the 2021 Langmuir Lectureship Award for his innovative work in the colloid and surface chemistry fields. Smalyukh will deliver a special presentation at the 2021 ACS Fall National Meeting, as will Professor Deborah Leckband of the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, who also earned the honor.

Wil Srubar in blue suit coat appearing on Zoom

Srubar featured in NSF Distinguished Lecture on Pride in STEM

July 29, 2021

Associate Professor Wil Srubar recently participated in the "Pride in Stem: A Conversation about Research, Mentorship and Advocacy" panel, a National Science Foundation Distinguished Lecture. The panel included NSF staff from the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, the LGBTQ+ and Allied Employee Resource Group and fellow NSF CAREER awardees who have demonstrated committment to the LGBTQ+ community through their work.

Nicholas Kellaris on a mountain bike with helmet and sunglasses in the desert

From MSE grad student to entrepreneur: Alumnus Nicholas Kellaris

June 3, 2021

Nicholas Kellaris (MatSci’20) is the Director of Research at Artimus Robotics, where he focuses on studying and improving electrohydraulic actuators—devices that convert stimulus into movement—and conducts research into the materials systems from which they are built. Kellaris formed the company with his fellow graduate students and his advisor, then-Assistant

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