Board Members

 Jason BuellJason Buell is a PhD candidate in science education. Jason has two main areas of research. The first is on how to support pre-service and in-service science teachers in learning to engage students in equitable and meaningful scientific practices. The second is on the intersections of race, science, and education. He views public scholarship as an important means for disrupting power structures that are maintained in part through controlling who has access to research, what counts as research, and who counts as a researcher. Before coming to Boulder, Jason was an elementary and middle school science teacher in the Bay Area. 

Molly Hamm-Rodríguez Molly Hamm-Rodríguez is a doctoral student in Educational Equity and Cultural Diversity. Her research interests are interdisciplinary, bridging linguistics, anthropology, education, and ethnic studies (especially Dominican and Puerto Rican Studies). Her work explores the intersections between language, im/migration, culture, social identity, and schooling, with a particular focus on transnationalism, diaspora, citizenship, and relational racialization. She believes that advancing public scholarship—and redefining what is valued as research and whose interests are centered in research—is necessarily part of any effort striving for equity and social change. Prior to moving to Colorado, Molly was the Associate Director of a nonprofit organization in the Dominican Republic. She received an M.A. in International Educational Development from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Matt Hastings Matt Hastings is a doctoral candidate in Education Foundations, Policy, and Practice. His research focuses on the ethical and pedagogical role of attention in education. This research is situated in a broader study of the ways attention in the field of education is directed by policy, research, and market-based reforms. Matt is committed to a public scholarship that promotes a well informed citizenry by drawing attention to and clarifying important issues, evidence, and perspectives. Before coming to CU Boulder, Matt completed a M.A. in philosophy of education at Teachers College, Columbia, and has a B.A. in philosophy from Illinois Wesleyan University. Matt taught English in Shenzhen, China and worked in an elementary classroom near his hometown, Chicago.

Mommandi Wagma   Wagma Mommandi, a doctoral candidate in Educational Foundations, Policy and Practice, is interested in the impacts of market-based education reforms on urban school districts and communities of color. Prior to graduate school, Wagma, who is a product of Denver Public Schools, was a high school science teacher in D.C. Public Schools. Wagma's commitment to public scholarship stems from her experience teaching in DCPS where she noticed a dearth of accessible research for teachers and community members who were trying to make sense of and push back on the rapid, and often dehumanizing, reform taking place.

Mary Quantz     Mary Quantz is a doctoral candidate in Educational Foundations, Policy, and Practice. Mary's research focuses on policies that impact how teachers engage with queer issues in schools and classrooms. She is particularly interested in the experiences of teachers who advocate for LGBTQ students in politically and religiously conservative communities. Mary believes public scholarship is a necessary step to bridging the gap between university-based education research and education policy and practice. Before coming to CU, Mary taught middle school language arts in Lehi, Utah. Mary received an M.A. in Teacher Education and a B.A. in English Education at Brigham Young University.

Maria Ruiz-Martinez  María Ruiz-Martínez is a doctoral student in Educational Equity and Cultural Diversity. Her research interests interrogate the coloniality of belonging by examining how race and the interrelated categories of ethnicity, gender, class, indigeneity, sexuality, and legal status impact the lives of transnational students from Abya Yala (the precolonial name for the Americas). These lines of inquiry bring Maria to further probe how imposed identity labels work in concert to oppress and marginalize students. She believes public scholarship is a tool to confront and reveal the material circumstances that deprive people of their humanity by moving away from hierarchical to dialogical ways of knowing and being. Prior to arriving at CU Boulder, Maria was a bilingual early childhood teacher.

Dan Moore Dan Moore is a Ph.D. student in secondary literacy studies. His research interests include creating culturally representative and equitable educational experiences for youth with early onset drug and alcohol addiction and working with pre-service and practicing teachers to create a more equitable educational experience for youth in alternative education settings such as incarceration facilities. Prior to attending CU, Dan received a B.A. in English and a M.Ed. literacy studies from University of Nevada, Las Vegas. He also taught in Clark County School District where he taught at a drug and alcohol recovery high school.

Chris Saldaña Chris Saldaña is a doctoral student in Educational Foundations Policy and Practice. His research examines the policies and laws that govern how K-12 public schools are funded and explores how these policies and laws might be redesigned or reformed to best serve students. Chris believes that public scholarship is an important tool in creating meaningful change, and he is committed to public scholarship that is both rigorous and inclusive of voices that have been and continue to be marginalized. Chris holds a B.A. in Economics from the University of California, San Diego and a M.A. in Economics from California State University, Fullerton. Prior to beginning his program, Chris worked as an economist for an economic research firm in Los Angeles, California.

Daniel Garzon Daniel Garzon is a doctoral student in Educational Equity and Cultural Diversity. His research interests include teacher and student raciolinguistic ideologies and identities, and education policy impacting Latinx communities in the US (especially in Florida). Daniel believes public scholarship empowers communities and schools with the tools to participate in current research and strive for educational equity. Prior to receiving an MA in Linguistics from Florida International University, Daniel was an elementary school Spanish teacher in Northern Virginia.

Faculty Advisers and Previous Editors