The Quantum Research Mixer was held on Monday, November 12, 2018. The event was designed to help catalyze quantum research collaborations across campus for the Quantum Explorations in Science & Technology (QuEST) Seed Grants

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Mixer Participants

 

Mark Ablowitz

Mark Ablowitz

Professor
Applied Mathematics
Key themes in Professor Ablowitz’ research are the understanding of the nonlinear wave phenomena that arise in physical problems. Mathematical techniques employed are asymptotic approximations, numerical and exact methods to obtain solutions to the underlying equations. Frequently employed are methods to solve certain nonlinear wave equations by the Inverse Scattering Transform (IST).
Dana Anderson

Dana Anderson

Professor • JILA Fellow
Physics
I'm interested in nonlinear optics, atom optics and optical precision measurements. In nonlinear optics, I study photorefractive systems for measurement and information processing, especially self-organized information processing. Our group is currently investigating acoustic and RF antenna-array signal processing and sensing of chemical vapors.
Penina Axelrad

Penina Axelrad

Professor, Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research (CCAR)
Aerospace Engineering
I am interested in Global Positioning System (GPS) technology and applications for real-time satellite orbit and attitude determination, GPS surface reflections, GPS multipath characterization and mitigation, orbital dynamics and spacecraft rendezvous.
Frank Barnes

Frank Barnes

Distinguished Professor • Professor Emeritus
Electrical, Computer & Energy Engineering
Andreas Becker

Andreas Becker

Associate Professor • JILA Fellow
Physics
I am interested in the analysis and simulation of ultrafast phenomena in atoms, molecules, and clusters, in particular, attosecond electron dynamics, coherent control, and molecular imaging. My research interests are related to the theoretical analysis and numerical simulation of ultrafast phenomena in atoms, molecules, and clusters interacting with intense laser pulses. My group pursues theoretical studies on the coherent control of chemical reactions, the observation of correlated electron dynamics in atoms and molecules, the imaging of molecular dynamics, and the propagation of ultrashort intense laser pulses.
John Bohn

John Bohn

Research Professor • JILA Fellow
Physics
My primary research centers on the theory of collisions between trapped atoms and molecules in a dilute gas at milliKelvin temperatures and below. In this novel energy regime, tiny energy splittings (due, for instance, to magnetic interactions or molecular rotations) dominate the collision dynamics. My goal is to unravel these delicate energy exchanges and assess their response to external electromagnetic fields.
Victor Bright

Victor Bright

Professor • Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research & Innovation
Mechanical Engineering
Dr. Bright and his group are developing novel fabrication processes and devices that advance the field of micro- and nano- electromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS). To accomplish this challenging task, we integrate atomic, nano, and micro fabrication techniques, technologies and advanced packaging. Using these tools, as well as modeling and simulation, we are able to engineer transducers, sensors and actuators that improve our capabilities and knowledge in a diverse array of disciplines that includes physics, engineering, medicine and biology.
Gang Cao

Gang Cao

Professor
Physics
Our research is driven by two interconnected thrusts: Discovery of New Quantum Materials and Control of Novel Quantum States. It encompasses a methodical search for new quantum materials, especially new 4d- and 5d-electron based materials, and a systematic effort to elucidate and control novel quantum states in these materials. Our group is equipped with (1) Comprehensive facilities to synthesize bulk single crystals of a wide range of materials, in particular, transition metal oxides and chalcogenides, and (2) a wide spectrum of tools for experimental studies of structural, transport, magnetic, thermal and dielectric properties as functions of chemical composition, temperature, magnetic field and pressure.
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Lijun Chen

Assistant Professor • Interdisciplinary Telecom Program
My research aims to build rigorous foundations and develop new methodologies in optimization, control, game theory, and systems theory for analysis, control, and design of complex networked systems, in particular, communication/computer networks and power networks. Problems associated with such systems are typically large, computationally hard, and often require distributed solutions; yet they are also very structured and have features that can be exploited. My research focuses on developing optimization and...
Eric Cornell

Eric Cornell

Professor Adjoint • JILA Fellow • Nobel Laureate (2001)
Physics
I am interested in precision measurements and Bose-Einstein condensation and related topics in ultracold atoms. I do experiments in Bose-Einstein condensation and related topics in ultracold atoms. More recently, I've been involved with an experiment to put an improved limit on the electron electric dipole moment. Still more recently, I've started a project to develop technology for extracting electricity from waste heat.
Jose D'incao

Jose D'Incao

Assistant Research Professor
Physics
The core of my research profile lies on the study of correlations in few-body atomic systems, i.e., systems with three or more atoms, relevant for ultracold quantum gases, e.g., Bose-Einstein condensates and Degenerate Fermi gases. Collisions involving few atoms can determine the stability/lifetime of ultracold gases and allow for the control of the interactions and the access of novel phases of the matter. Due to its extremely nonpertubative nature, few-body...
Dessaudan

Daniel Dessau

Professor • JILA Adjunct Fellow
Physics
Professor Dessau's research interests center around using femtosecond optics and electron spectroscopic tools for the study of the electronic structure, magnetic structure, and phase transitions of novel materials systems such as high-temperature superconductors (HTSCs or cuprates) and colossal magnetoresistive oxides (CMRs or manganites).
Oliver DeWolfe

Oliver DeWolfe

Associate Professor
Physics
I am interested in string theory and supergravity, their applications to other phenomena via holography, particle physics, cosmology and quantum field theory. I am interested in studying the characteristics of string theory, its predictions for the quantum nature of space and time, and both direct applications (particle physics, supersymmetry breaking, the cosmological constant, dynamics in the early Universe) and indirect applications (dual descriptions of heavy ion and strongly correlated systems).
Oliver

Oliver DeWolfe

Associate Professor
Physics
I am interested in string theory and supergravity, their applications to other phenomena via holography, particle physics, cosmology, and quantum field theory. I am interested in studying the characteristics of string theory, its predictions for the quantum nature of space and time, and both direct applications (particle physics, supersymmetry breaking, the cosmological constant, dynamics in the early Universe) and indirect applications (dual descriptions of heavy ion and strongly correlated systems).
Dejan Filipovic

Dejan Filipovic

Charles Victor Schelke Endowed Professor
Electrical, Computer & Energy Engineering
Prof. Filipovic's research is in the area of antennas and applied electromagnetics. Emphasis is on frequency independent, ultra-wideband, and optical antennas, direction finding front-ends, use of microfabrication technologies for millimeter wave systems, high-power microwaves, passive microwave components, EM wave propagation, electronic warfare, and application of electromagnetic modeling for nano-meter size wires' metrology.
Jason Glenn

Jason Glenn

Professor
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences
Professor Jason Glenn's research group focuses on astronomy and instrumentation at far-infrared through millimeter wavelengths. Current astronomy projects include characterizing warm molecular gas in galaxies detected with the Herschel Space Observatory, detailed investigations of molecular gas morphology, dynamics, and excitation in galactic nuclei with Atacama Large Millimeter Array observations, and measuring the structure and properties cold interstellar gas in our own Milky Way. Instrumentation projects include developing new superconducting millimeter-wave...
Joshua Grochow

Joshua Grochow

Assistant Professor
Computer Science
My research has two main thrusts (with deep underlying relations beneath): 1) Interactions between theoretical computer science and mathematics (particularly algebraic geometry, representation theory, and group theory), and 2) developing the theory of complex systems and complex networks and applying this theory with my collaborators in a variety of fields, such as ecology, evolutionary biology, economics, climate, and beyond. I'm always looking for new problems that need new theory!
Victor

Victor Gurarie

Professor • Director, Center for Theory of Quantum Matter
Physics
I am interested in emergent phenomena in condensed matter and many-body physics when the behavior of many-body systems cannot be reduced to a sum of their constituent parts. Common methods used in my work are the nonperturbative techniques of many-body theory and quantum field theory. My work has applications within the new field of the ultracold atomic gases, in the more conventional condensed matter physics, as well as to the mathematical aspects of quantum field theory.
Gerardo Gutierrez

Gerardo Gutierrez

Associate Professor
Anthropology
I study how human activities generate political and economic arrangements that are reflected on landscapes. In particular. I have analyzed the territorial appropriation of large areas by prehistoric political groups: how and why polities formed, defended, and expanded their territories, and subsequently adapted to the intrusion of larger states and empires.
Nils Halverson

Nils Halverson

Department Chair
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences
Professor Halverson develops millimeter-wavelength instrumentation to study the origins of the universe through observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Observations of the CMB can be used to gather evidence for gravitational waves released by an early period of inflation, and can be used to constrain the neutrino mass and the understand the growth of structure and dark energy. He is currently a co-investigator on two ground-based CMB experiments: the...
Michael Hermele

Michael Hermele

Associate Professor
Physics
Michael Hermele is a theoretical physicist working on strongly correlated quantum systems. These are systems, occurring both in solid state materials and ultracold atomic gases, where quantum mechanics and interactions among the constituent particles combine to give rise to striking collective behavior. Hermele uses modern techniques of quantum field theory and other tools to study the collective behavior of correlated systems.
Aaron Holder

Aaron Holder

Assistant Professor Adjunct • Faculty Scientist, Materials and Chemical Science Technology Center
Chemical & Biological Engineering • National Renewable Energy Laboratory
Murray Holland

Murray Holland

Professor • JILA Fellow
Physics
The Holland theory group's research is on properties of quantum gases with a focus on transport in optical lattices and on strongly interacting superfluids. The group is also working on superradiant cavity QED with group-II elements to develop a mHz linewidth "laser."
Shu-Wei Huang

Shu-Wei Huang

Assistant Professor
Electrical, Computer & Energy Engineering
Dr. Huang and his group study novel ultrafast nonlinear dynamics in photonic structures and incorporate the dynamics to enhance the device performances with focuses on sensing and imaging applications. We are also interested in the functional integration of photonic devices with microfluidics, MEMS, photopolymer, and 2D materials to broaden the scope of chip-scale sensing and imaging devices.
Jaron-Becker

Agnieszka Jaron-Becker

Associate Research Professor • JILA Associate Fellow
Physics
Agnieszka Jaron-Becker serves as co-director of JILA’s Ultrafast Theory Group, which specializes in theoretical studies of ultrafast processes in atoms, molecules, and nanostructures. These ultrafast processes are induced, observed, and controlled by ultrashort intense laser pulses. The laser frequencies studied range from the far infrared through the optical to the soft x-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum.
Ralph Jimenez

Ralph Jimenez

Associate Professor Adjoint • JILA Fellow
Chemistry
We are advancing the frontier of quantum measurement science by exploring the unique properties of entangled photons interacting with fluorescent proteins and other fluorophores used in cellular imaging. For example, time-energy entanglement can significantly enhance nonlinear light-matter interactions. Entangled two-photon absorption follows linear rather than the classical quadratic intensity dependence and can be observed at much lower photon fluxes than two-photon absorption in conventional multiphoton microscopy.
Henry Kapteyn

Henry Kapteyn

Professor • JILA Fellow
Physics
My primary interest is in developing – and making use of – new tabletop "x-ray laser" light sources. 20 years ago, the process of "high order harmonic generation" (HHG) was discovered, where an intense short pulse laser focused into a gas at high intensity was shown to produce light at very high-order harmonics of the driving laser. By implementing this technique using new laser technologies we developed, it became possible to drive this process to an extreme, generating x-ray light that still retains the coherence of the driving laser.
Adam Kaufman

Adam Kaufman

Assistant Professor Adjoint
Physics
My research focuses on how to apply the tools of atomic, molecular, and optical physics to the microscopic investigation of quantum mechanics. I am interested in understanding and revealing the role of entanglement in complex quantum systems, both from a fundamental standpoint as well as for the purpose of understanding relevant condensed-matter models. I also investigate how to push the limits on our ability to retain quantum coherence while building up increasingly complex quantum states.
Knappe Svenja

Svenja Knappe

Associate Research Professor
Mechanical Engineering
My research focuses on developing miniaturized quantum sensors and systems, with the aim to produce manufacturable, high-performance sensors. The use of microfabrication technologies and novel packaging processes are a central component in our approaches. The interdisciplinary research includes investigations of novel spectroscopic methods, frequency control, and metrology, microfabrication and manufacturing technologies, and magnetic field simulations.
Alexandra Kolla

Alexandra Kolla

Associate Professor
Computer Science
Dr. Kolla’s interests lie in theoretical computer science and, more specifically, spectral graph theory and convex optimization.
Adam Kowalski

Adam Kowalski

Assistant Professor
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences • LASP
My research interests are solar and stellar astrophysics with a specialization in spectroscopy of optical and ultraviolet emission in stellar flares. I use state-of-the-art modeling codes combined with analysis of data from ground and space-based observatories (such as Hubble, IRIS, and the APO ARC 3.5m) to understand how the lower, dense stellar atmosphere (chromosphere and photosphere) is heated in response to the sudden release of magnetic energy during flares. I...
Lee

Minhyea Lee

Assistant Professor Adjoint
Physics
My research focuses on understanding collective behavior in condensed matter systems via electrical and thermal transport properties, under the control parameters of high pressure and magnetic field. The systems of interest include anomalous Hall effect materials, itinerant magnetic systems, novel superconductivity in the vicinity of other ground states, and high thermoelectric materials. We also use nano-fabrication and microwave measurements to develop novel probes for correlated electron systems based on shot noise.
Yung Cheng "YC" Lee

Yung Cheng "YC" Lee

S. J. Archuleta Endowed Professor
Mechanical Engineering
Dr. Lee’s research focuses on the integration of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) with microelectronic, optoelectronic and microwave devices.
Konrad

Konrad Lehnert

Professor Adjoint • JILA Fellow
Physics
I am interested in studying quantum coherence in macroscopic mechanical oscillators, developing quantum-coherent networks of microwave signals for control and measurement, and implementing quantum-limited measurements in astrophysics and condensed matter experiments.
Leibfried

Dietrich Leibfried

Ion Storage Group
NIST
My main research interests are precision spectroscopy and quantum state-control of trapped atomic ions, in particular for quantum information processing and quantum simulation.
David

David Leibrandt

Lecturer • Ion Storage Group, NIST
Physics
My group studies collisions and reactions of simple cold molecules. Our ultimate goal is to understand the quantum mechanical processes involved in making and breaking a chemical bond. We aim to control the reacting molecules external and internal degrees of freedom in the quantum regime. To accomplish this control, we slow down a supersonically cooled molecular beam using time-varying inhomogeneous electric fields (Stark deceleration). The cold (~100 mK) molecules are then loaded into an electrostatic trap to allow for interactions to be studied for several seconds.

Baowen Li

Rennie Family Endowed Professor
Mechanical Engineering
Dr. Li’s research spans theoretical, computational, and experimental study of both coherent phonons (waves) and incoherent phonons (heat) in nano and atomic scale. Research topics include but not limited to control and manipulation of heat flow and using phonons (as information (both classical and quantum) transmission, storage (memory), and detection (sensing). Cloaking of heat and seismic waves.
Carl Lineberger

Carl Lineberger

Distinguished Professor
Chemistry
Professor Lineberger is interested in the structure and stability of ions and free radicals, photoelectron spectroscopy of anions, and photophysics and dynamics of cluster ions. The experimental methods all involve the interaction of laser radiation with mass-selected ion beams.
Youjian (Eugene) Liu

Youjian (Eugene) Liu

Associate Professor
Electrical, Computer & Energy Engineering
Dr. Liu's research is focused on the optimization of communication systems and networks, their performance analysis, and their performance upper limit characterization. His interests include artificial intelligence aided wireless and wireline communications, information theory, and coding theory.
Dragan Maksimovic

Dragan Maksimovic

Professor • Co-Director, Colorado Power Electronics Center (CoPEC)
Electrical, Computer & Energy Engineering
Dr. Maksimovic's research is focused on power electronics, the technology that ties renewable sources such as photovoltaics and wind turbines to the electric power grid, propels hybrid and electric vehicles, powers a countless variety of electronic systems, and makes it possible to operate battery-powered mobile devices for many hours. Dr. Maksimovic is directing the Colorado Power Electronics Center (CoPEC) in explorations of ways to achieve significant system-level advances in energy...
Robert McLeod

Robert McLeod

Richard & Joy Dorf Endowed Professor
Electrical, Computer & Energy Engineering
Dr. McLeod's research is at the intersection of optics and soft materials. That is, the lab develops novel optical patterning techniques to structure new forms of polymers which are then measured with optical imaging methods created specifically for this purpose. One example is a new form of semiconductor lithography that can pattern material at scales well below the traditional diffraction limit. Another project is using laser trapping to position live...
Josef Michl

Josef Michl

Professor
Biochemistry
The areas of most interest at this time are (i) Photochemistry and photophysics of singlet fission for higher efficiency solar cells, (ii) Electron and ion conducting compounds and polymers of new types, (iii) Surface-mounted molecular rotors and molecular circuits based on organic, organometallic, and inorganic structures, synthesized covalently or by self-assembly, and intended for use in nanoelectronics, nanofluidics, and optical metamaterials, (iv) "Naked" lithium cation catalyzed reactions, especially to radical...
Garret Moddel

Garret Moddel

Professor
Electrical, Computer & Energy Engineering
Professor Moddel’s research interests are in the area of quantum engineering of new devices for energy conversion. With his lab he is developing new ultra-high-speed metal-insulator diodes for solar rectennas, devices that collect and rectify sunlight and waste heat. He also is investigating a technology for extracting energy from the quantum vacuum.
MargaretM

Margaret Murnane

Professor Adjoint • JILA Fellow
Physics
I am interested in ultrafast laser and x-ray science, ultrafast femtosecond-to-attosecond dynamics in molecular and materials systems, development of tabletop coherent x-ray sources and their application in science and technology.
Rahul

Rahul Nandkishore

Assistant Professor
Physics
I am interested in complex many-body systems can display qualitatively new physics. The search for such emergent phenomena is a central goal of condensed matter physics. My research is focused on the search for new emergent phenomena in quantum many body systems with strong interactions and/or strong randomness. I work on systems both in and out of equilbrium.
neogisanghamitra

Sanghamitra Neogi

Assistant Professor, Center for Aerospace Structures (CAS)
Aerospace Engineering
I am interested in structure-processing-property relationships in materials and structures; Crystals, solid-fluid material interfaces, composite systems; Vibrations, waves (kHz-THz) and heat propagation across bulk structures and interfaces, dissipative and nonlinear dynamics; Theoretical and computational materials science; Analytical theory, classical and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, multiscale methods.
David Nesbitt

David Nesbitt

Professor Adjunct • JILA Fellow
Physics
My research includes quantum-state-resolved laser spectroscopy and dynamics of van der Waals and hydrogen-bonded clusters, time-resolved kinetics of atmospheric radicals, crossed-beam studies of state-to-state inelastic and reactive dynamics, high-resolution laser spectroscopy of jet-cooled radicals and molecular ions, nonlinear frequency generation of narrowband tunable infrared laser sources, vibrationally mediated photochemistry in size/quantum state-selected clusters, and more.
Scott Palo

Scott Palo

Victor Charles Schelke Endowed Professor, Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research (CCAR)
Aerospace Engineering
I am interested in design, construction, deployment and operation of small satellite systems; remote sensing of the thermosphere and ionosphere; meteor radar design and operation; and Arctic and Antarctic UAS measurement systems.
Parkwon

Wounjhang (Won) Park

Professor
Electrical, Computer & Energy Engineering
Dr. Park's research is centered at discovering new optical phenomena and applications using nanoscale materials and structures and has currently three major thrusts: energy harvesting, nonlinear optical devices and nanomedicine. For energy harvesting, Dr. Park is developing a new type of photovoltaic devices that can efficiently convert heat into electricity by using novel nanostructures. Dr. Park is also developing nonlinear devices operating in the mid-infrared region for sensing, communications, and switching.
Rafael Piestun

Rafael Piestun

Professor
Electrical, Computer & Energy Engineering
The research in Dr. Piestun's group deals with the control and processing of optical radiation at two significant spatial and temporal scales: the nanometer and the femtosecond. Interest in this area arises from the existence of new phenomena occurring at these scales and the fascinating applications in new devices and systems. Current challenges in sensing, imaging, communications, energy conversion, and computing provide a continuous motivation for this work.
Zoya Popovic

Zoya Popovic

Distinguished Professor • Lockheed Martin Corporation Endowed Chair of Radio Frequency Engineering
Electrical, Computer & Energy Engineering
Prof. Popovic advises on research in areas of high-efficiency linear microwave power amplifiers, low-loss broadband microwave and millimeter-wave circuits and antennae, millimeter-wave and THz quasi-optical techniques, active antenna arrays, near field electromagnetic probing, wireless powering for low-power sensors and high-power wireless near-field charging, microwave applications in medicine such as high-field MRI and core body temperature measurements, and microwave heating for waste management.
John Price

John Price

Professor
Physics
My group uses solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to explore quantum dynamics relevant to quantum materials and quantum information processing. Nuclear spins are the highest coherence quantum bits available, and our experiments can be thought of as "quantum simulations," that elucidate the properties of a precisely defined quantum systems.
Dimitra Psychogiou

Dimitra Psychogiou

Associate Professor
Electrical, Computer & Energy Engineering
My research focuses on the design and practical realization of adaptive RF passive components for: i) next generation wireless communication transceivers with multi-functional and multi-standard operability and for: ii) electronic warefare systems that intelligently adapt to dynamically-located interferers. In particular, I look into novel RF design concepts that facilitate architectures with highly-miniaturized volume, multiple levels of transfer function adaptivity and combined RF signal processing actions. Furthermore, I investigate low-cost, hybrid integration/manufacturing schemes that enable the realization of tunable RF components for frequencies as low as 10s of MHz to as high as 100 GHz.
Leo

Leo Radzihovsky

Professor
Physics
My interests span a broad spectrum of condensed matter, ranging from liquid crystals, colloids, membranes, rubber and other "soft" matter to degenerate atomic gases, superconductors, and quantum Hall systems. The unifying theme is the collective universal behavior that emerges at long scales and low energies, driven by a combination of strong interactions, fluctuations, and/or local heterogeneity.
Markus Raschke

Markus Raschke

Professor
Physics
I am interested in experimental nonlinear and ultrafast nano-optics. Spatio-temporal optical control, optical antennas, surface plasmon and phonon polaritons, extreme nonlinear optics, strong light matter interaction; scanning probe near-field optical microscopy and spectroscopy, optical forces, and opto-thermal phenomena; dynamics and phase behavior of complex oxides, semiconductor nanostructures, and polymer nano-composites.
Mark Rast

Mark Rast

Associate Chair for Graduate Studies
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences
I’m interested in astrophysical fluid dynamics with an emphasis on convective dynamics and scale selection, turbulence, the excitation of the solar/stellar p-modes, and the origin of solar/stellar irradiance variations. Investigations range from studying highly simplified turbulent analogs based on point vortex motions to highly realistic simulations of radiative magnetohydrodynamics, spectral synthesis, and spectropolarimetric inversions. I am also involved in the development of the Critical Science Plan for the National Solar...
cindyregal

Cindy Regal

Associate Professor
Physics
My main research interest is engineering and exploring isolated quantum systems for quantum information and quantum optics. In particular I focus on manipulating single and few neutral atoms and the quest to control single phonons in mesoscopic mechanical oscillators. This experimental work relies upon low-loss optical interfaces and laser cooling and trapping techniques.
Reyanamaria

Ana Maria Rey

Associate Research Professor • JILA Fellow
Our research interests are in the scientific interface between atomic, molecular and optical physics, condensed matter physics and quantum information science. Specifically, on ways of developing new techniques for controlling quantum systems and then using them in various applications ranging from quantum simulations/information to time and frequency standards. We want to engineer fully controllable quantum systems capable to mimic desired real materials as well as to develop advanced and novel measurement techniques capable of probing atomic quantum systems at the fundamental level.
Dmitry Reznik

Dmitry Reznik

Associate Professor
Physics
Professor Reznik's research focuses on using neutron, x-ray, and Raman scattering to investigate the physics of correlated electrons and electron-phonon coupling in perovskite oxides (including high Tc supercondcutors, manganites, etc) and other exotic materials. The group of Prof. Reznik investigates complex solids by neutron, x-ray and Raman scattering. Of particular interest are exotic magnetic phases, electron-phonon interactions in perovskite oxides, and polaronic physics.
Greg Rieker

Greg Rieker

Assistant Professor • Vogel Family Faculty Fellow • Research & Innovation Office Faculty Fellow
Mechanical Engineering
Prof. Rieker leads the Precision Laser Diagnostics Laboratory, which aims to understand and improve energy and atmospheric systems through laser-based sensing. Activities in the laboratory span from fundamental science (light-matter interaction) to applied science (practical sensing in real world systems). The laboratory places strong emphasis on entrepreneurship in academic pursuits, from challenging the traditional ways that research has been carried out in a particular field, to actively commercializing technologies that can have a positive impact on our future.
Charles Rogers

Charles Rogers

Professor
Physics
Our group works in the general area of experimental condensed matter physics of thin films and very small systems. Presently, the group is working on the nanoelectromechanical behavior of nanowires and fabricated electromechanical structures, buried interfaces in photovoltaic systems, and surface molecular dipole systems. Nanoscale objects are made with a combination of photolithography, electron-beam lithography, epitaxial thin-film growth.
Paul Romatschke

Paul Romatschke

Associate Professor
Physics
My research focuses on Cold Dense Matter, Relativistic Viscous Hydrodynamics, Non-Abelian Plasma Instabilities, Nonlinear Gravity, among other topics.
Schibli

Thomas Schibli

Associate Professor
Physics
My group and I strive to advance science and technology in the fields of optics and photonics through advanced functional materials, novel laser systems and measurement techniques.
Sean Shaheen

Sean Shaheen

Associate Professor • Associate Chair for Education
Electrical, Computer & Energy Engineering
Dr. Shaheen and his group carry out research in a variety of areas aimed at advancing solar energy harvesting, developing new optoelectronic materials and devices, and studying fundamental processes in biological systems. The central mission of our work is to find creative and insightful solutions to scientific problems both basic and applied, using a combination of experimental research and computational simulation to guide our efforts.
Krister S

Krister Shalm

Sr Research Associate • Quantum Nanophotonics Group, NIST
Physics
Li Shang

Li Shang

Associate Professor
Electrical, Computer & Energy Engineering
Dr. Shang's research spans several emerging areas of integrated circuit (IC) and system design, including embedded systems, design automation, design for nanotechnologies, and computer systems. As fabrication technology improvements steadily scale down the minimum feature size towards the nanometer regime, numerous challenges have emerged, from IC electronic system design to physical technology integration. Addressing these challenges will have timely and significant industrial and social benefits by advancing fundamental semiconductor technologies and electronic system integration.
Sandeep Sharma

Sandeep Sharma

Assistant Professor
Chemistry
The aim of our research is to invent techniques that will enable us to elucidate the electronic structure of transition metal containing materials with partially filled d/f orbitals in the presence of strong non-adiabaticity and environmental fluctuations. Our work attempts to provide a molecular level understanding of phenomena that are of critical importance in heterogeneous catalysis, multiferroics for electronics, superconductivity and are even relevant in biology for bird navigation via magnetoreceptors and enzyme catalyzed redox reaction of small molecules.
Graeme Smith

Graeme Smith

Assistant Professor • JILA Associate Fellow
Physics
My main research interests are quantum information and quantum computing. I try to identify the fundamental limits that physics places on communication, information processing, and sensing and understand the implications of these limits both in terms of practical technologies and fundamental physics. This involves finding new ways to think about information and computation, and new ideas for analyzing them.
Kate Stange

Katherine Stange

Assistant Professor
Mathematics
Research: Number theory and arithmetic geometry and its applications, including post-quantum cryptography and quantum computing.
Jeffrey Thayer

Jeffrey Thayer

Negler Professor of Aerospace Engineering Sciences • Director, Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research (CCAR)
Aerospace Engineering
Dr. Thayer’s research focuses on the application of engineering solutions to study the aerospace environment of Earth’s atmosphere and geospace, the region of space strongly influenced by earth’s gravitational field, magnetic field and plasma-neutral interactions. Thayer also specializes in active remote sensing techniques employing engineering concepts to design, develop, deploy and apply lidars to atmospheric studies and apply radar techniques to geospace studies.
James T

James Thompson

Associate Professor Adjoint • JILA Fellow
Physics
My research focuses on understanding the interface between ultracold atoms and quantum optics - an understanding I plan to apply to the field of precision measurement. I am presently devising strategies to reduce the effect of the fundamental quantum noise that arises from Heisenberg's uncertainty relationship as applied to atomic spins. In one project, I work on non-destructively measuring and canceling out the quantum fluctuations in the collective spin state of an ensemble of laser-cooled 87Rb atoms in a high-finesse optical cavity.
Juri Toomre

Juri Toomre

Professor
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences
I am interested in theoretical and computational astrophysics, including solar and stellar convection, magnetic dynamo action within stars, turbulence in many settings, and helioseismology. Central to this is theoretical work involving modern fluid dynamics, often based on 3-D simulations on supercomputers, that can be challenged and tested by astrophysical observations.
Joel Ullom

Joel Ullom

Lecturer • Quantum Sensors Group, NIST
Physics • NIST
My research is focused on developing superconducting electronics for sensing across much of the electromagnetic spectrum. For example, superconducting sensors can be used for high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy, and for the detection of astrophysical millimeter-wave radiation from the cosmic microwave background. Current research projects include very basic topics (what is the resistance mechanism in thin-film superconducting sensors?) and very applied topics (the construction and delivery of complete instruments to various observatories).
Marina Vance

Marina Vance

Assistant Professor
Mechanical Engineering
Dr. Vance’s research is focused on air quality, particularly on measuring emissions and understanding the dynamics of aerosols in the context of ambient and indoor air quality. Applications of her research range from consumer safety and "safer by design" consumer products, to indoor and outdoor air pollution, soiling of photovoltaic panels and sustainability, and exposure science.
Kelvin Wagner

Kelvin Wagner

Professor
Electrical, Computer & Energy Engineering
Prof. Wagner performs research to harness the unique computational capabilities of linear and nonlinear optical interactions of light with novel materials in order to produce optical systems with unprecedented computational power. Holographic optical signal processing is performed using photorefractive materials. Spatial-temporal holographic processing for applications such as true-time-delay squint-free multibeam array processing, high resolution spectral analysis, and radar range-Doppler and angle-of-arrival signal processing is performed using spatial-spectral holography.
Ronggui Yang

Ronggui Yang

Professor
Mechanical Engineering
My research interests are on modeling and characterization of electrical, thermal, and thermoelectric transport properties of nanostructured materials, synthesis of novel nanostructures, and applications of nanostructured materials in energy conversion, storage, and thermal management.
Xiaobo Yin

Xiaobo Yin

Associate Professor • Bruce S. Anderson Engineering Faculty Fellow
Mechanical Engineering
My research focuses on natural and artificial nanoscale materials with unique optical, optoelectronic properties and their potential applications. Areas of study include understanding the electronic and optical characteristics of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) and their localized defects; designing and characterizing metallic metamaterials with novel optical behavior, and engineering nanophotonic materials and structures for scalable applications.
Alexander Zunger

Alexander Zunger

Research Professor
Materials Science & Engineering Program • Renewable & Sustainable Energy Institute
My research field is Theory of Real Materials. This encompasses development and application of atomistic theoretical methods for describing the electronic, magnetic, structural, mechanical and transport properties from first principles quantum mechanic.