Sarah Stanford-McIntyre
Assistant Professor

Dr. Sarah Stanford-McIntyre received her BA in History and American Studies from the University of Texas at Austin and her MA and PhD in American Studies from William & Mary. She has arrived in Colorado by way of West Texas, Virginia, and Wyoming. 

Trained primarily as a US historian, her work focuses on how new technologies impact communities, shape social worlds, and change local environments. Among other topics, she has published on the history of the grain elevator, the oil industry in Hollywood film, environmental contamination in the American oil industry, and the global history of green energy production. 

Not only interested in studying the history of technology, she also applies digital mapping and computing capabilities to humanities research. Her current digital work uses mapping softwares and data visualization tools to track the long-term economic, social, and environmental impact of extractive industry. This work can be found at sstanfordmcintyre.com 

She is currently working on two book projects: Her monograph looks at oil workers in the West Texas Permian Basin to track an environmental history of US neoconservatism. She is also co-editing a book of essays on the energy industries in American cinema.

In the classroom, she works to contextualize current debates about the ethical and social implications of technological development and environmental change. While contemporary conversations about issues such as the changing global economy, climate change, and environmental stewardship are often heated, such conversations are also very old. In her courses students read extensively from primary source documents that demonstrate just how much we can learn much from the past as we move forward. Engineers are builders and problem solvers. Deep appreciation for the broader impact of their solutions will help to create a more just and equitable world.

Outside of the classroom, she spends much of her free time as a mountain trail runner. Her long-term goal is to attempt pack burro racing at least once.