woman in rainbow striped shirt smiling
MSW • LCSW

Melissa is a licensed clinical social worker with a diverse clinical background of working with adolescents and adults providing individual, family, and group psychotherapy, as well as resource and case management. She earned her MSW degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 2007 and received her undergraduate degrees in Psychology and Communications at the Pennsylvania State University. Melissa’s clients have come to rely on her strengths as a practitioner, some of which include empathy, unconditional regard, a sense of humor, cultural humility, integrity, and consistency.

These traits help her in building a strong therapeutic alliance and safe therapeutic environment in which she encourages self-awareness, self-empowerment, self-acceptance, and trust.  Melissa is also able to help clients explore and identify the issues underlying self-destructive thoughts, behavior, and dysfunctional patterns in their lives and relationships.

Prior to joining the staff of CAPS at CU Boulder in 2019, Melissa was employed at the University of Pennsylvania, initially as the Associate Director of Admission and Recruitment at the School of Social Policy & Practice and then as the first Patient Care Manager/Behavioral Health Consultant at Student Health Service. Her previous clinical experiences include The Renfrew Center, the University of Pennsylvania Counseling &
Psychological Services, Girard Medical Center, Collaborative Care of Abington, and Whitemarsh Behavioral Health Care.

Education

  • MSW - University of Pennsylvania School of School Policy & Practice
  • BA - Psychology, Communications, Pennsylvania State University

The place I'd most like to visit or sight I'd most like to see

Although my list of places I want to go and things I want to see is long, the phenomenon I most desire to experience is the Northern Lights.

Areas of interest

Through her clinical experiences Melissa has developed a proficiency in integrated care, assessment, case management, depression, anxiety, adjustment, grief, eating concerns, interpersonal difficulties, identity issues, working with international students, and concerns with gender or sexual identity.