Elizabeth Carlton smiling next to a tree
Colorado School of Public Health

Elizabeth Carlton is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health at the Colorado School of Public H​ealth. She is an environmental epidemiologist who is interested in the ways in which social and environmental processes, from urbanization to climate change, impact water-borne diseases. Her research has documented the impact of climate, particularly heavy rainfall events, on enteric infections. She currently leads a decade-long study of the reemergence and persistence of the water-borne parasitic infection, schistosomiasis, in southwest China. Professor Carlton teaches graduate courses on environmental epidemiology, global infectious diseases, and the health impacts of climate change. She received her PhD in Environmental Health Sciences from the University of California Berkeley, her MPH from the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University and her BS in biology from Yale University. Prior to graduate school, she was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Honduras.

Research Interests

  • Surveillance and control of water-borne diseases
  • The use of genomics to understand infection pathways for Schistosoma japonicum and other water-borne parasites
  • Estimating the health impacts of climate change, particularly on water-borne diseases

Courses Taught

  • EHOH 6617 Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology
  • EHOH 6635 Climate Change and Health
  • EHOH 6624 Infectious Diseases, Environmental Contexts

Education

  • PhD Environmental Health Sciences, University of California, Berkeley
  • MPH Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University
  • BS Biology, Yale University

Honors and Awards

  • Dean’s Recognition Apple for Teachers, School of Pharmacy, University of California, San Francisco, 2008, 2009
  • M. Donald Whorton Writing Award, Center for Occupational and Environmental Health, 2013
  • International Journal of Epidemiology Photoessay Competition. Runner-up. 2015.
  • Delta Omega National Honorary Society in Public Health, Inducted 2017

Recent Publications

  • Shortt JA, Card DC, Schield DR, Liu Y, Zhong B, Castoe TA, Carlton EJ, Pollock DD 2017. Whole Genome Amplification and Reduced-Representation Genome Sequencing of Schistosoma japonicum Miracidia. PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 11:e0005292.
  • Levy K, Woster AP, Goldstein RS, Carlton EJ. Untangling the Impacts of Climate Change on Waterborne Diseases: a Systematic Review of Relationships between Diarrheal Diseases and Temperature, Rainfall, Flooding, and Drought. Environ Sci Technol. 2016;50(10):4905-22.
  • Carlton EJ, Liu Y, Zhong B, Hubbard A, Spear RC. 2015. Associations between schistosomiasis and the use of human waste as an agricultural fertilizer in China. PloS Negl Trop Dis 9:e0003444.
  • Carlton EJ, Eisenberg JN, Goldstick J, Cevallos W, Trostle J, Levy K. Heavy rainfall events and diarrhea incidence: the role of social and environmental factors. American journal of epidemiology. 2014;179(3):344-52.
  • Carlton EJ, Hubbard A, Wang S, Spear RC. Repeated Schistosoma japonicum infection following treatment in two cohorts: evidence for host susceptibility to helminthiasis? PloS Negl Trop Dis. 2013;7(3):e2098.

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