Detail of Toe Tag Wall (Phillips Museum of Art, Franklin & Marshall College)

Exhibition highlights death in the desert

Feb. 4, 2021

CU Boulder researchers hosting workshops to create map of lives lost on U.S. border

Proteins with T-Cells

Biochemist wins $750k for novel cancer research

Feb. 3, 2021

CU Boulder professor recognized for her research on cancer drug resistance

The border

Doctoral student documents border cities ‘torn apart’

Jan. 29, 2021

On the U.S.-Mexican border, Bertha Bermúdez Tapia shines a light on the effects of COVID-19 and restrictive immigration policies.

Neuron stock photo

Why do psychiatric drugs help some, but not others? New study offers clues

Jan. 29, 2021

A new CU Boulder study shows that a key protein involved in learning and memory formation functions differently in males than in females.

DC region hires

Scholars reveal the changing nature of U.S. cities

Jan. 28, 2021

New research unravels the mystery of how our cities evolved into their present form.

Coyote walking in the snow

Learning to live with fear

Jan. 25, 2021

Joanna Lambert’s research in evolutionary biology carries lessons for coexisting with coyotes, COVID-19 and each other.

Litos NSF award

Physicist wins major early career development award

Jan. 21, 2021

CU Boulder physicist plans to use the award to pursue cutting-edge plasma-physics research.

POOL PHOTO BY ANDREW HARNIK

From Biden’s giant Bible to Christian flags waved by rioters, ‘religion’ means different things to different people and different eras

Jan. 21, 2021

A similar complexity appears in the history of early Christianity in how religion functioned, both in terms of rituals and in the use of the Latin term it derives from.

Phone a friend image

Psychologist launches #TalkMentalIllness course for the masses

Jan. 19, 2021

After leading a ‘call to action’ on burgeoning mental-illness crisis, prof launches a massive, open online course on mental health.

Photo of an ear of corn

Soil degradation costs U.S. corn farmers a half-billion dollars every year

Jan. 15, 2021

Researchers have found that a whopping one-third of the fertilizer applied to grow corn in the U.S. each year simply compensates for the ongoing loss of soil fertility, costing farmers a half-billion dollars.

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