Scott Ortman

Ortman receives prize for book about Southwestern archaeology

June 14, 2016

Scott Ortman, assistant professor of archaeology, has been awarded the 2017 Linda S. Cordell Prize for his book, Winds from the North: Tewa Origins and Historical Archaeology.

What Rousseau didn’t know

What Rousseau didn’t know

Feb. 17, 2016

Economic inequality is a hot topic in a presidential election year. Economists, politicians and journalists are all weighing in — but what, exactly, can an archaeologist bring to the discussion? Sarah Kurnick, a Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow at CU-Boulder, is glad you asked.

the carcass of a dead animal lies next to the limestone quarry that borders the site of a 1970 trichloroethylene spill near Le Roy, Photographs by Donna Goldstein.

‘Hysteria’ theory short on science

Feb. 17, 2016

In 2011, 12 high-school girls in upstate New York began to exhibit strange neurological symptoms: tics, verbal outbursts, seizure-like activity and difficulty speaking. The diagnosis was “conversion disorder.”

A petroglyph of an eclipse is seen with a wide-angle lens in a photograph at Chaco Canyon, where CU-Boulder researchers captured a rare Aurora Borealis in the southern night sky. Photo courtesy of Fiske Planetarium.

A digital look at ancient skies gets a showing at Fiske

Feb. 17, 2016

Having captured the summer solstice and a week’s worth of sunsets, sunrises and their lunar equivalents from the vantage point of ancient Chacoan people in southwestern Colorado, using parabolic video technology, a multi-disciplinary team from the University of Colorado Boulder counted its June 2015 trip a success.

Alchemy in the Rain Forest Cover

Alchemy in the Rain Forest

Feb. 17, 2016

Politics, Ecology, and Resilience in a New Guinea Mining Area By Jerry Jacka, assistant professor of anthropology Duke University Press In Alchemy in the Rain Forest Jerry K. Jacka explores how the indigenous population of Papua New Guinea’s highlands struggle to create meaningful lives in the midst of extreme social...

Who wants to see animals in art? Humans do, as a CU-Boulder art exhibition demonstrates. Unidentified artist, Greek, Ob: (Head of Athena r., later style, in helmet with olive leaves and scroll) | Re: ΑΘΕ, 454 – 404 BCE, silver tetradrachm, 1 inch dia., Transfer from Classics Department to CU Art Museum, University of Colorado Boulder, 2014.06.99, Photo: Katherine Keller, © CU Art Museum, University of Colorado Boulder

Long before kitten videos, animals inspired art

Dec. 2, 2015

n a partnership between the University of Colorado Boulder Art Museum and the CU Museum of Natural History, the exhibition Animals in Antiquity will explore the relationships between humans and animals through the ages. The exhibition is on view at the Museum of Natural History through September 2016.

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