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Zyzda

More undergrad research, yes, research, in arts and humanities

There’s a reason you aren’t likely to see a Hollywood blockbuster featuring a laboratory dedicated to, say, American literature, philosophy, Italian languages or any other arts and humanities discipline: For the most part, researchers in those disciplines work as individuals, and not on laboratory teams. Read more
Natalie Ahn

Distinguished biochemist elected president of national society

Natalie Ahn, a professor of distinction in the department of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of Colorado Boulder, was elected president of The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology last year and began her term as president-elect in July. Read more
Locally grown food

Thinking globally, eating locally

For decades in the post-World War II era, it’s fair to say that the diet of most Americans became less and less local. With innovations ranging from the interstate highway system to affordable home refrigeration and freezing systems, it simply became easier to eat food that came from a state — or even a country — far, far away. Read more
Bison

There’s a Buff-to-Buff call on line 1

When you pick up the phone, you speak with a bright, enthusiastic student from your alma mater. Soon, you find yourself giving the caller career advice, learning about the latest developments on campus, laughing, and yes, talking about the importance of private donations to CU Boulder’s mission. Read more
John Warner at the USA Pro Cycling Challenge (USPCC) Time Trial Awards. Photo by Jenise Jensen.

Dentist packs life with adventure, civic service, altruism

John Warner is a dentist who’s climbed and skied mountains in the United States, Canada, South America and Europe, raced motorcycles and mountain bikes, and, incidentally, served as a town mayor, search-and-rescue volunteer, orchestra backer, and dentist-of-mercy in Guatemala. Read more
Lienzo de Petlalcala

CU scholars named American Council of Learned Societies fellows

Three University of Colorado Boulder professors have won prestigious fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies. The three are among 69 fellows chosen from 1,100 applicants. Read more
Megan Dulsky

Scholarship recipients and donors celebrate together

When Meghan Dulsky heard that she was going to study abroad, she was elated. Later, when she learned that most of her experience would be funded, she was brought to tears. Dulsky, a senior majoring in classics, is the recipient of the Ann Nichols Scholarship and the Herodotus Travel Grant. Read more
Wiesel

Celebrating Elie Wiesel: Holocaust survivor, moral authority, political activist

CU Boulder's Program in Jewish Studies and the Boulder Public Library are hosting an event on the late Elie Wiesel, featuring a lecture and special presentation, at 1 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 4, at the Boulder Public Library. Read more
Tin Tin

CU lab’s fruit-fly work yields patented cancer treatment

CU Boulder and SuviCa recently received a patent for a promising chemical, SVC112, which helps prevent regrowth of cancer cells following radiation exposure. The chemical was originally identified through lab research with fruit flies — a process that is being shared with undergraduate students — and its synthesis helped create a collaborative pipeline for cross-disciplinary work through CU’s Technology Transfer Office. Read more
Zoe Donaldson

MCDB professor helps bring science to the screen

The Science and Entertainment Exchange acts as a kind of matchmaking ‘hotline’ for filmmakers seeking expertise in a particular scientific discipline. The Exchange will contact researchers at various institutions on the filmmaker’s behalf to find an appropriate expert willing to do some informal consulting. Read more
Power plant

Boosting power plants’ efficiency can cause emissions rebound, study finds

Increasing the efficiency of power plants’ efficiency is often assumed to be an effective means of reducing carbon emissions. However, an empirical analysis of plants’ efficiency and emission led by a University of Colorado Boulder sociology professor casts some doubt on that conventional wisdom. Read more
Great spreadwings

Great spreadwings have spread from the southwest to northern New England

A large damselfly hung placidly from a forsythia branch in my back yard, so I approached within three feet to get a good view. On the next day it had moved to a spirea, and once again it was tolerant of my close approach. Read more
More Recent News Stories

Features

Locally grown food

Thinking globally, eating locally

For decades in the post-World War II era, it’s fair to say that the diet of most Americans became less and less local. With innovations ranging from the interstate highway system to affordable home refrigeration and freezing systems, it simply became easier to eat food that came from a state — or even a country — far, far away.
Abby and Maribel
The visionaries see brighter days in Peru
Stephen Graham Jones
Author has Mongrels on the brain
Wildfire in Colorado Springs
Humans, wildfires forge a ‘socioeconomic pathology’
Like-minded discourse breeds extremism
Like-minded discourse breeds extremism